Questions tagged [gerund-vs-infinitive]

Questions about the differences between "gerunds", formed with *-ing*, and infinitives, formed with *to*.

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Can the mentioned verb be in a bare infinitive form?

However, rather than undermine its epistemic value, the intentional character of testimony is arguably essential to this value. Shouldn't it be "undermining" or "undermine"? As it is after "than", ...
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0answers
459 views

Using gerund at the beginning of bullet points: What is more common, better or correct?

Is it correct or common to use the gerund at the beginning of bullet points? Which of the following examples is more common, better or correct? What are the pros and cons? Can I use the gerund? ...
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1answer
967 views

“believe someone to do something” - (why) is it wrong?

Edit: I added a comment to address the duplicate issue. I had an issue with English grammar a few weeks ago, that is still haunting me, and I assume it to be related to mixing up grammars. I ...
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1answer
744 views

Verbs changing from gerund to infinitive

Some verbs such as advise, recommend, permit, allow, require, forbid are used in sentences either gerund or infinitive. For instance, The plumber recommended buying a new water heater. The plumber ...
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1answer
775 views

the verb “shock” + participle phrase

I found a question asking: Upon leaving, we were shocked to discover/discovering that a mandatory tip of 15 percent was added to our bill. the answer is "to discover" to explain the reason ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Cases that accept both “to” + infinitive and “to” + gerund

I have searched both Google and this site. According to Collins, predispose can accept both to + infinitive and to + gerund. I find this questionable, but there it is. Other than that, I can think of ...
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2answers
538 views

“Predisposed to” + gerund or infinitive? [closed]

My own logic and basic grammar rules would say gerund: He is predisposed to plagiarizing. Because I would also say: He is predisposed to plagiarism. But Google tells me that: He is predisposed ...
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2answers
573 views

“All I want is for him to return safe” Why isn't it “…for him is to…”?

All I want is _______ to return safe I have encountered the question like the title in the book "Starter TOEIC" 3rd edition by Anne Taylor, which is in "Infinitives and Gerunds" unit. 4 options are: ...
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1answer
661 views

“I was starting suspecting something was wrong” <— What's the grammar problem here? [duplicate]

I have been using “starting suspecting” frequently thinking that it’s correct too but recently my friend corrected me. I don't understand why. It is well-known that start to + verb and start verb-ing ...
4
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1answer
27k views

proud to be & proud of being

I have the following two sentences which I would like to confirm the difference in meaning for. I am proud to be a nurse. I am proud of being a nurse. I'm mainly wondering about the difference in ...
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0answers
299 views

Bare infinitive with exceptions

Reading the sentence: "We were still talking about what we should do when we heard the children shouting". in the above sentence, why don't we write "heard the children shout", as the verb 'hear' ...
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1answer
32 views

difference in meaning between 2 phrases [duplicate]

I need to know the difference between these two sentences 1)He stopped to playing football 2)He stopped playing football
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1answer
525 views

Finish reading or finish of read. Why we use gerund forms as infinitives verbs?

I see that some words in English are expressed in gerund, with the meaning corresponding to the infinitive, and used as infinitive verbs. Could someone please explain to me, why does this happen? I'm ...
2
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1answer
170 views

Which should I use, infinitive or participle? [closed]

I found this description in Wikipedia on infinitive. As a modifier of a noun or adjective. This may relate to the meaning of the noun or adjective ("a request to see someone"; "keen to get on"), or ...
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2answers
1k views

Gerund? Infinitive? Why, when we talk about jobs, do we say “I have a job taking people on tours” instead of “I have a job to take people on tours”?

I'm teaching English in China. I wanted middle school or younger, but I was put with some great high school kids and they sometimes ask me questions that I don't know how to answer yet. I'm a native ...
4
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1answer
676 views

Can gerund and infinitive forms be interchangeable when functioning as subject of a sentence?

I am having trouble using gerund/infinitive forms when functioning as subject of a sentence. For instance, which one of these two sentences is correct? Eating ice cream on a windy day can be a ...
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0answers
230 views

Infinitive of Purpose or For [duplicate]

Could you please tell me which usage is correct ? 'I need money to start a business' 'I need money for starting a business' Actually the first one sounds more natural to me and also I know for is ...
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1answer
974 views

Which one should I use when; ' to verb' vs 'verb(ing)'? [duplicate]

I came across a question in my ACT practice test which got me really confused as I was unaware of this rule. The question was: I simply feel better to know a pen is handy. a) No change b) to know ...
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0answers
158 views

“latency to do” or “latency to doing”?

What's correct? Environmental enrichment leads to more active behaviour in an open field and causes a shorter latency to interact with a novel object" Or should it be 'latency to interacting'? ...
2
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1answer
635 views

What I saw was him enter the building

(1) I saw him enter the building. (2) What I saw was him _________ the building. I'd like (2) to mean basically the same thing as (1). Can "enter" (infinitive) be entered in the blank? (No ...
38
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2answers
5k views

Is this sentence from Orwell's Animal Farm grammatically sound?

Should been really have been included in the following passage from George Orwell’s Animal Farm, or was this somehow an erroneous insertion of a spurious word? Illustration from p. 17 of the 1990 ...
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2answers
714 views

Pseudo-cleft sentences with the verbs of perception

I know we must use bare infinitives with these verbs in the Active. e.g. I saw a lady cross the street. There are other verbs with which we are supposed to use a bare infinitive in the Active. e.g. ...
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1answer
3k views

Do I need to use gerund after the “it wasn't until…” structure? [duplicate]

I need help with the grammar relating to the "it wasn't until" phrase. It wasn't until I heard him speak/speaking that I recognized his voice. Which is correct, speak or speaking? Why? I would ...
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2answers
5k views

Verb do + verb to be + ing form

What are the correct tenses to use in the following sentence between gerund and infinitive? What I do at this point is ____ home and _____ dinner. Should I write: What I do at this point is ...
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1answer
619 views

What irritates me is “going” vs. “go” vs. “to go” to school in the morning [closed]

I have a problem with using "what clause". Which of following sentences is correct? What irritates me is going to school in early morning What irritates me is to go to school in early ...
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1answer
551 views

Structure with to infinitive or gerund or past participle

I read a vocabulary book . There is a sentence which makes me confused. " The government had passed a bill outlawing smoking while driving" . I wonder if why the author use "outlawing" here but not ...
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1answer
219 views

Mixed saying / witty remark about remarks

I need to mix To err is human, to persist [...] is diabolical with a joke about too much remarking. The result should be To err is human, to persist in remarking is diabolical. Should I ...
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5answers
5k views

Hear Me Roar Vs Hear Me Roaring? [duplicate]

In Katy Per­ry’s song “Roar”, she says this at the end of the cho­rus: You’re gonna hear me roar Why did she use the bare in­fini­tive form of the verb roar here in­stead of that ver­b’s ‑ing form?...
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1answer
1k views

Subject-control verbs

I have been studying Raising and Controlling, but it seems quite hard to understand its function and uses. I would like any of you to analyze this explanation and tell me whether I got it correct or ...
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1answer
4k views

When do I say “I have seen people do it” and not “I have seen people doing it”? [duplicate]

What is the difference between I have seen people do it and I have seen people doing it?
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1answer
2k views

“prone to collapse” or “prone to collapsing”?

Is there a difference between something that is "prone to collapse" and "prone to collapsing"? The former appears to be more common than the latter - but are they both acceptable?
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2answers
52k views

Can I start a sentence with To + verb? [duplicate]

For example: Making new friends is important to your happiness. and To make new friends is important to your happiness. I know the second sentence sounds odd, but I'm not sure if it's ...
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1answer
837 views

'there will be' gerund or infinitive

Which one is better: There will be a lot of voters to vote in the election. or There will be a lot of voters voting in the election.
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2answers
70k views

Which expression is correct? “I've already started working on it” or “I've already started to work on it” [duplicate]

today i attended an interview. The employer told me that I should know some skills about the job. Today I am going to start to work on those skills. Now, I am writing a "thank you for the interview" ...
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1answer
154 views

Gerund vs. infinitive: are both forms acceptable for the following examples?

It is a lesser evil to have x than to have y. Having x is a lesser evil than having y. Which of them are incorrect?
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2answers
425 views

'Using a keyboard is better' v 'It's better to use a keyboard': and why IT with the infinitive?

I'm trying to make sense of the rule behind "to use" vs "using" in these specific cases Using a keyboard is better. To use a keyboard is better. It's better to use a keyboard. It's better ...
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1answer
204 views

Should I use an infinitive or “in” plus a gerund?

Which sentence would be more appropriate? "Scholars like John Smith are highly qualified to write professional essays." OR "Scholars like John Smith are highly qualified in writing professional ...
2
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1answer
658 views

“need help using” vs “need help to use” [duplicate]

Let me know if you need any help using the computer. I don't understand why 'use' ends with -ing. Shouldn't we use 'to' after the verb-'need'? If I can say “I need to use the computer now”, why is ...
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1answer
2k views

Steps to create or steps to creating [duplicate]

I am writing some technical documentation and I got confused when I saw the following paragraph title: Steps to creating a new thing* in production I think the correct title should be: Steps to ...
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2answers
4k views

Difference between “to remember” vs “for remembering”

I am struggling to choose the correct / more idiomatic one between: A description may be added for remembering the context better. A description may be added to remember the context better. ...
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1answer
565 views

Usage of a verb “ to need” with to-infinitive or -ing form: change in meanings

The Cambridge dictionary says that the meaning of a verb "to need" can change depending on what you have used after it: to-infinitive or -ing form. I haven't comprehended it completely. Could someone,...
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4answers
2k views

“The carrots need being chopped” and “The carrots need to chop” [closed]

We can say both of the following: The carrots need to be chopped. The carrots need chopping. How does the grammar of these sentences affect their meaning? Why is it that in these instances need ...
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1answer
131 views

Should “to mean” take an infinitive or a gerund for its complement? Does it make any difference?

Which of the following sentences is grammatically correct: To be human means to have a choice.      INFINITIVE CLAUSE means INFINITIVE CLAUSE To be human means having a choice.       ...
4
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2answers
14k views

Can to-infinitives be used after the verb “dislike”?

Can to-infinitives follow the verb dislike? I know they can follow the verb like that way, but what about dislike? I ask because my school grammar textbook says the following: The verb dislike ...
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1answer
7k views

“It's better being” vs “it’s better to be“ [duplicate]

When gales tear at the mountain peaks, it's better to be a horse in Sunnfjord than an emperor in Russia.” Should I use the being form there instead of to be? Why or why not? Are both ok, or is one ...
2
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0answers
39 views

When to prefer the -ing ending over “which” / “who” / “to” / “that” etc. and vice versa? [duplicate]

It seems to me that in many English sentences the -ing ending can replace words like which / that / who / to etc. Some examples: "I prefer to study in the library." OR "I prefer ...
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8answers
2k views

“What I'm doing is watching TV.” — Why does it have to be the gerund-participle ('watching')?

What I do is watch TV. What I did was watch TV. What I had done was watch TV. ... But, What I am doing is watching TV. The only possible form of watch in the last sentence is ...
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1answer
552 views

Gerund phrase vs infinitive phrase

I am having trouble using gerund/infinitive phrases. In this sentence, which is correct the infinitive or the gerund: Clearly, more attention – and investment – is needed on leveraging/to leverage ...
0
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1answer
385 views

Two gerunds with “requires” or “facilitates”

I have a student who is trying to write a scientific paper - her text is littered with a particular sentence construction that I find very awkward to read, but I'm not sure how to describe it to her ...
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2answers
8k views

to meet or meeting [duplicate]

I had a lot of opportunities to meet many different people and listen to their stories. Always I am confused whether I have to use "to Verb" or "Verb+ing". I guess that sentence is the past tense, so ...