Questions tagged [gerund-vs-infinitive]

Questions about the differences between "gerunds", formed with *-ing*, and infinitives, formed with *to*.

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Verbs changing from gerund to infinitive

Some verbs such as advise, recommend, permit, allow, require, forbid are used in sentences either gerund or infinitive. For instance, The plumber recommended buying a new water heater. The plumber ...
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1answer
2k views

Cases that accept both “to” + infinitive and “to” + gerund

I have searched both Google and this site. According to Collins, predispose can accept both to + infinitive and to + gerund. I find this questionable, but there it is. Other than that, I can think of ...
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92 views

health experts foresee/predict the novel coronavirus spreading in the U.S

One of the top officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned Americans on Tuesday that health experts foresee the novel coronavirus that has killed thousands spreading in the ...
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25 views

Being sensitive vs To be sensitive

Being sensitive to others when taking part in a general discussion is a useful quality to have. vs To be sensitive to others when taking part in a general discussion is a useful quality to have. I ...
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0answers
461 views

Using gerund at the beginning of bullet points: What is more common, better or correct?

Is it correct or common to use the gerund at the beginning of bullet points? Which of the following examples is more common, better or correct? What are the pros and cons? Can I use the gerund? ...
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299 views

Bare infinitive with exceptions

Reading the sentence: "We were still talking about what we should do when we heard the children shouting". in the above sentence, why don't we write "heard the children shout", as the verb 'hear' ...
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2answers
4k views

Difference between “to remember” vs “for remembering”

I am struggling to choose the correct / more idiomatic one between: A description may be added for remembering the context better. A description may be added to remember the context better. ...
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1answer
554 views

Gerund phrase vs infinitive phrase

I am having trouble using gerund/infinitive phrases. In this sentence, which is correct the infinitive or the gerund: Clearly, more attention – and investment – is needed on leveraging/to leverage ...
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1answer
2k views

“prone to collapse” or “prone to collapsing”?

Is there a difference between something that is "prone to collapse" and "prone to collapsing"? The former appears to be more common than the latter - but are they both acceptable?
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1answer
343 views

Which one is correct: “to have verbed” or “verbing”?

I have two confusing sentences and I am in two minds whether the first or the second is more grammatically correct: He was by far the most knowledgeable person to have commented on the subject, so it ...
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2answers
5k views

Verb do + verb to be + ing form

What are the correct tenses to use in the following sentence between gerund and infinitive? What I do at this point is ____ home and _____ dinner. Should I write: What I do at this point is ...
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11 views

I plan to use this approach to do something or doing something

I know if we say "This is an approach to doing something" we should use "to doing" after approach. In the case "I plan to use this approach ", should I say "to do&...
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34 views

Can the following sentences both be correct meaning different things?

"Ron dedicated his whole life to educating underprivileged children." And "Ron dedicated his whole life to educate underprivileged children." In the first sentence, "to" ...
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19 views

“this drug induces sleeping” or “this drug induces sleep”?

I seem to have heard both structures before, but I don’t understand which it would be. In other languages the second verb would be in the infinitive, but I have heard things like "Josh hates ...
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21 views

Word form after MEAN

Help me with this question, please. I know that if we use mean+gerund it means having a result (can be replaced with 'involve') as in Working from home means being able to keep work-life balance. If ...
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1answer
483 views

When the adjective 'suited' is followed by a verb, should this verb be in the infinitive or in the -ing form?

Here are some example sentences from different dictionaries. With her qualifications and experience, she would seem to be ideally suited to/for the job. (Cambridge online dictionary) This was a job ...
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158 views

“latency to do” or “latency to doing”?

What's correct? Environmental enrichment leads to more active behaviour in an open field and causes a shorter latency to interact with a novel object" Or should it be 'latency to interacting'? ...
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11k views

Whether to use gerund or infinitive with word 'hesitate'?

Firstly, i am giving some sentences from some books and links: She hesitates singing in the company of her friends. (from my local book) In order to oblige others or amuse herself, she never ...
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1answer
633 views

Gerund vs infinitive paraphrase

Is there any difference between these two sentences: "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, discouraging rich people from voting for them" "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, which discourages ...
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1answer
73 views

being usages dilemma

I've read in BBC that we use use "being" as a verb-ing. BBC has listed two kinds of usage; what I want to learn about here is the "preposition + verb-ing" usage. It has been said that "being + past ...
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1answer
47 views

Can the mentioned verb be in a bare infinitive form?

However, rather than undermine its epistemic value, the intentional character of testimony is arguably essential to this value. Shouldn't it be "undermining" or "undermine"? As it is after "than", ...
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2answers
336 views

The way the past participle is used in these sentences

First, this is the meaning I am trying to put in writing: She could not tolerate the sight of them as they were being put to death. And I want the progressive aspect to be clear. Which of ...
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1answer
54 views

“It is an advantage learning a foreign language”. -> It is an advantage to learn…? (infinitive or -ing)

I've come across the following sentence in an article which provides businessmen with advice on how to improve their career prospects. "It is an advantage learning a foreign language." I think the ...
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1answer
838 views

'there will be' gerund or infinitive

Which one is better: There will be a lot of voters to vote in the election. or There will be a lot of voters voting in the election.