Questions tagged [gerund-vs-infinitive]

Questions about the differences between "gerunds", formed with *-ing*, and infinitives, formed with *to*.

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3
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2answers
6k views

“He had me do this” vs “He had me doing this” vs “He had my doing this”

I know this example sounds awkward, but it’s obviously grammatically incorrect to say "me being here" in sentences like this one: He said me being here was wonderful. That instance of me being ...
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1answer
35 views

Why's “subject to the vacant possession of the Premises be ready to be delivered to the Tenant” wrong?

The landlord's realtor keeps insisting that "be" is correct. She repeats she's been practicing real license for at least 20 years, and she's read thousands of these clauses. She asked if I ...
14
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1answer
134k views

“It is worth mentioning” versus “it is worth to mention”

What’s the right way to use the phrase it is worth? Which of the following two approaches is right, and how they are different? It is worth mentioning that [. . .] It is worth to mention that [. . .]
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2answers
4k views

Difference between “to remember” vs “for remembering”

I am struggling to choose the correct / more idiomatic one between: A description may be added for remembering the context better. A description may be added to remember the context better. ...
2
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1answer
744 views

Verbs changing from gerund to infinitive

Some verbs such as advise, recommend, permit, allow, require, forbid are used in sentences either gerund or infinitive. For instance, The plumber recommended buying a new water heater. The plumber ...
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0answers
37 views

Correct answer for the following question? What is the reason? [duplicate]

I have come accross a multiple choice question in which I mixed up for what the answer might be. I am aware that we could use a gerund after help but not sure so much. Here I add the picture of the ...
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0answers
11 views

I plan to use this approach to do something or doing something

I know if we say "This is an approach to doing something" we should use "to doing" after approach. In the case "I plan to use this approach ", should I say "to do&...
0
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0answers
40 views

“Not to watch” vs “Not to have watched” as subject of a sentence [duplicate]

E.g. 1 Not to watch Kobe Bryant's matches when he was alive is my biggest regret. £.g. 2 Not to have watched Kobe Bryant's matches when he was alive is my biggest regret. Am I right that e.g. 1 is not ...
0
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0answers
23 views

What is the correct form for an ad banner [duplicate]

What is the correct form: "Stop mumbling, start speaking!" or "Stop mumbling, start to speak!" ? This is for an advertisement of foreign language learning appl=. Thanks
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1answer
43 views

My job is to do something or doing something? [duplicate]

My job is to teach English. My job is teaching English. Which one is correct and why?
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0answers
34 views

Can the following sentences both be correct meaning different things?

"Ron dedicated his whole life to educating underprivileged children." And "Ron dedicated his whole life to educate underprivileged children." In the first sentence, "to" ...
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0answers
16 views

To + infinitive vs. To + gerund [duplicate]

In one of the grammar books I study I found a following example: In my previous job I was confined to doing only one thing. I'd say that confined to do is the correct way to say it. I always thought ...
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1answer
474 views

When the adjective 'suited' is followed by a verb, should this verb be in the infinitive or in the -ing form?

Here are some example sentences from different dictionaries. With her qualifications and experience, she would seem to be ideally suited to/for the job. (Cambridge online dictionary) This was a job ...
0
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0answers
19 views

“this drug induces sleeping” or “this drug induces sleep”?

I seem to have heard both structures before, but I don’t understand which it would be. In other languages the second verb would be in the infinitive, but I have heard things like "Josh hates ...
0
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1answer
31 views

Gerund after “to”. Sentence: We use music to helping us relax

I found this question in a test: "We use music to helping us relax." Where helping was the correct answer option. I want to know why is this form of the verb correct and not the infinitive ...
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10answers
20k views

“To include” vs. “including”

In the hot story of today (the U.S. Senate report on "Enhanced Interrogation Techniques"), I noticed the following: He was subjected to numerous and repeated torture techniques, to include being ...
0
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2answers
35 views

What is the right way to start a sentence: “To avoid wasting time trying to figure out” or “To avoid to waste time trying to figuring out”?

I have some problems when it comes to the usage of "to" vs "ing" to express the infinite form like in: [1] To avoid wasting time trying to figure out ..." [2] To avoid to ...
0
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1answer
32 views

What difference in meaning is imparted by changing the verb form?

These are both grammatically correct: You’ll go back to reliving your college days. You’ll go back to relive your college days. The former is rather like "I look forward to seeing you...", ...
0
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2answers
55 views

Why can't to-infinitive be used as subject in “Not to learn French is my biggest regret.”?

E.g. 1 "Not learning French is my biggest regret." E.g. 2 "Not to learn French is my biggest regret." I know that e.g. 1 is correct and e.g. 2 is wrong, but what is the grammar ...
0
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1answer
59 views

Is this slogan grammatically correct in its double use of the to-infinitive?

The motto of the institution where I work is: To explore the potential of nature to improve the quality of life Is this (double use of the to-infinitive) grammatically correct? And if so, is it ...
2
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2answers
1k views

Is “acknowledge(accept status) sb + to + infinitive” valid?

When to acknowledge is used in the sense of to admit the gerund is used. I acknowledge having made a mistake. However, I was wondering what is the appropriate form in the sense of to accept status....
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1answer
126 views

Time to infinitive or time for gerund

Please consider the following constructions: 1. It's time to launch it 2. It's time for launching it 3. It's time for being taught this lesson 4. It's time to be taught this lesson Which one(s) is/are ...
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0answers
21 views

Word form after MEAN

Help me with this question, please. I know that if we use mean+gerund it means having a result (can be replaced with 'involve') as in Working from home means being able to keep work-life balance. If ...
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0answers
30 views

Gerund versus infinitive [duplicate]

I wonder if someone could offer feedback about the use and meaning difference between the use of infinitive and gerund Being an artist is admitting you are lost and not wanting to be found. Being an ...
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3answers
143 views

What is the difference between using gerunds vs. infinitives as the subject of a sentence?

For example: What is the difference in saying "To err is human" vs. "Making mistakes is an intergal part of the human condition?" In our textbook "Speak Out C1" the author explains that it is more ...
5
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2answers
12k views

“I like watching” vs “I like to watch” What's the difference?

Which of the two possibilities would native speakers more likely say when they watch a football (soccer or American) match from the comfort of their home? What sport do you watch most on television?...
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2answers
157 views

‘Drive somebody to’: Why with infinitive?

We use ‘look forward to + gerund’. According to Cambridge the use of gerund is due to the fact that ‘to’ is a preposition when following ‘look forward’ (as opposed to an infinitive marker). At the ...
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0answers
92 views

health experts foresee/predict the novel coronavirus spreading in the U.S

One of the top officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned Americans on Tuesday that health experts foresee the novel coronavirus that has killed thousands spreading in the ...
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0answers
22 views

Difference in meaning between gerund and infinitive [duplicate]

The whole class was working hard preparing for the exam. The whole class was working hard to prepare for the exam. What are the differences between these two sentences?
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2answers
2k views

Is there a difference between “started to go” and “started going”? [duplicate]

Is there a meaning difference between started to go and started going in this example sentence? "...", he said and started to go/going away.
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1answer
51 views

When to use verb, base verb or gerund [closed]

Hello i have question help me please The children were so frightened they dared not [?]. => Moving / to move / move ? Why is the answer "Move" without "to" ? I have searched and found a site which ...
1
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1answer
152 views

Go shopping vs for shopping [closed]

Yesterday I was teaching my student about the verb shop. I told him that we use "go" with "shop" to mean to go and buy things. e. g. 1) You are going shopping. 2) You were going shopping. ...
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0answers
48 views

See somebody do/doing something [duplicate]

Consider these two variations: Every morning, tourists can see soldiers raise the national flag in the square. Every morning, tourists can see soldiers raising the national flag in the square. What ...
1
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0answers
25 views

Being sensitive vs To be sensitive

Being sensitive to others when taking part in a general discussion is a useful quality to have. vs To be sensitive to others when taking part in a general discussion is a useful quality to have. I ...
20
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7answers
10k views

How does one know when to use a gerund or an infinitive?

As a native speaker of English, the gerund version of this sentence sounds better: infinitive: When used together in chains, extension methods are an unprecedented tool to produce extremely ...
0
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1answer
73 views

'To solve' versus 'To solving'

Trying to understand what seems to be a very subtle difference in written and spoken English. Recently, I've seen articles that use 'to + gerund' and 'to + infinitive' in the exact same situations, ...
0
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0answers
96 views

Is this tutorial using “to [verb]-ing” the right way? When should I just use “to [verb]”? [duplicate]

That tutorial says Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) is an approach to analyzing datasets to summarize their main characteristics. It is used to understand data, get some context regarding it, ...
0
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2answers
73 views

What are the correct words I have to insert here? (Verb patterns) [closed]

I have to complete this sentence with verb patterns. I think that my answer is correct but the checker does not think the same. Your hair needs -------------- . It looks a right mess! (CUT) I ...
0
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1answer
970 views

“doomed to” + noun or infinitive?

I know the phrase "doomed to failure" exists. I also found someone here who suggests that both, "doomed to failure" and "doomed to fail" can be used for a specific ...
0
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3answers
187 views

Allow X: What’s the difference between “for the sharing of X” and “to share X”? Do they mean the same thing?

What is the difference between these two: Presentation events allow for the sharing of knowledge. Presentation events allow to share knowledge. Do they share the exact same meaning?
11
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5answers
5k views

Hear Me Roar Vs Hear Me Roaring? [duplicate]

In Katy Per­ry’s song “Roar”, she says this at the end of the cho­rus: You’re gonna hear me roar Why did she use the bare in­fini­tive form of the verb roar here in­stead of that ver­b’s ‑ing form?...
0
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0answers
61 views

I saw him going to city. I saw him go to city [duplicate]

1:I saw him going to city. 2:I saw him go to city. First one refers to Gerund. Second one refers to infinite. Do they have the same meanings or changed? Define it with reasons.
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2answers
18k views

I saw her dance/dancing? I saw a flash of lightning strike/striking? I caught her steal/stealing? [duplicate]

Meta: I found a very similar post asking the difference between "I saw him cross" and "I saw him crossing". I have three additional questions on sentences of this form. In the post I am referring to, ...
7
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1answer
25k views

“I saw him crossing” vs. “I saw him cross” [duplicate]

I saw him crossing the road. I saw him cross the road. Which one is correct and why?
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2answers
4k views

To see them play/playing [duplicate]

Excuse my limited acquaintance on English usage; which sentence is grammatically correct, and if any, which meaning does each convey? I saw them play chess. I saw then playing chess.
0
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1answer
18 views

“… assisting emerging countries meet their development goals…” vs “… assisting emerging countries in meeting their development goals…”

Her role included assisting emerging countries meet their development goals through active engagement with senior level representation from both the public and private sectors. Her role included ...
-1
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1answer
73 views

being usages dilemma

I've read in BBC that we use use "being" as a verb-ing. BBC has listed two kinds of usage; what I want to learn about here is the "preposition + verb-ing" usage. It has been said that "being + past ...
0
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1answer
63 views

Which of the following sentences is correct ; basically I don't understand where to use gerund and where infinitive, and why

It is snowing; will you like to go skiing on Saturday or Sunday? It is snowing ; will you like to go skii on Saturday or Sunday? (plz reason the answer in simple and discernible way)
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0answers
24 views

To smoke vs Smoking at the beginning of the sentence [duplicate]

I have been taught that we can use either of "to INF" or "Verb-ing" at the beginning of the sentence as a subject, which leads me to a point of confusion. Here is my confusion: A: To smoke is ...