Questions tagged [future]

In grammar, a future tense is a special verb form (inflection) that marks the event described by the verb as not having happened yet. Germanic languages like English have no future tense inflection, employing alternate mechanisms to indicate future events.

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At this time tomorrow, I am playing cricket [closed]

I know that: At this time tomorrow, I will be playing cricket. is used since the so-called future continuous is used to talk about a continuous activity at a specific time in the future. Even ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
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3 answers
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"When" + future perfect usage

A Scots friend of mine corrected my usage of future perfect in this construction: Right, see you in five years when your mother tongue will have taken another ten steps back. Maybe the construction ...
Titus Toia's user avatar
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Should I use 'can' or 'will be able to'? "If he fixes your car tonight, you [?] drive it to school tomorrow." [closed]

Should I change "will be able to" to "can" in the bolded sentence from the exchange below? A: My car broke down and I have to drive to school to pick up my daughter tomorrow. I ...
Skywarrior's user avatar
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SImple present to talk about the future [duplicate]

Here is my question, are both of the following acceptable? I start dieting after Christmas. I will start dieting after Christmas. This is the task from Oxford English Grammar Advanced. Note: I know ...
linaaa.styrczula's user avatar
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Fill in your application up to 7 days prior to your arrival [duplicate]

I found this sentence in an government-provided online form to visit a country in the Caribbean: "You can fill in your Online ED Card application up to 7 days prior to your arrival" It ...
zmippie's user avatar
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Can we use adverbs of frequency with "will"? [closed]

I’ve seen this text in which "sometimes" has been used with "will". I assume the sentence is explaining a habit, and I wonder why it’s been said with "will". Sometimes I'...
Marjan's user avatar
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Problems with 'future' and articles [duplicate]

I'm a teacher and was doing articles with my students. This sentence, however, really got me stuck! We are entering [an] uncertain future. Why is there an indefinite article here? At first, I ...
Ross O'Toole's user avatar
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'Will be -ing' or 'Is -ing'?

When teaching Future Continuous vs Future Perfect the other day, a student stumped me with an observation of the following question taken from the 4th Edition of English File by Oxford: Sonia is ...
Eritrea Yunani's user avatar
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How would you phrase a question to a person that regressed spacetimewise? [closed]

This is quite confusing. Let's say, there's this person who came back in time to their original state in that particular moment. So, they know exactly how things play out in their timeline point. How ...
Recovery Email's user avatar
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Usage of doesn't in future tense

Is the following sentence grammatically correct and why? (a) "I reckon she doesn't come in on Thursday hearing that" I was told that since the sentence is in future tense and I am expecting ...
Boiling Iceberg's user avatar
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A peculiar use of "shall" in North Carolina's constitution, Art. VI

Article VI of North Carolina's constitution from 1971 contains a provision whose constitutionality is being discussed over at law SE. Section 8 starts Sec. 8. Disqualifications for office.       The ...
Peter - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
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Future perfect continuous tense of be verb [closed]

The future perfect continuous tense of 'be' verb is a possibility? 1 I will have been being in the cinema industry for 3 months by this Christmas. Is this type of sentence construction used in the ...
sam7702000's user avatar
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Over the next 2 weeks [closed]

I need to clarify the time mentioned in this sentence: Can you please provide me a few dates and times that will suit you over the next 2-3 weeks? So the dates mentioned should be any day from now ...
Tung D. Nguyen's user avatar
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"a certain event will occur by a" particular "period of time" means that said event can occur at any instant of time within said "period of time" [duplicate]

In English, if a person states, "a certain event will occur by a" particular "period of time" then does that mean that said event will occur any time within said "period of ...
crazyTech's user avatar
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Is the passive constructed correctly: "The city will have been being locked down for 15 days from tomorrow"? [duplicate]

That is what I learned from grammar books. "I go to the cinema tomorrow" means I am scheduled to go there at that fixed time “I am going to the movies tomorrow” means I bought the ticket (...
Tom's user avatar
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Rhetorical effects of future tense when describing past event

Just before 2 a.m., as it prepared for its return to Earth, the Crew Dragon jettisoned what SpaceX calls the “trunk” section of the spacecraft — the cylindrical compartment below the gumpdrop-shaped ...
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Can one use transpire in the future tense?

My partner used the phrase ".... something planned... whether it transpires or not remains to be seen.". Now, I don't know for a fact, but I feel that transpir(es/ed) is (or should be) used ...
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usage of when and tense in a conditional sentence? [closed]

There are two conditional sentences which one is more correct grammatically? When I come home, my children will be playing. When I come home, my children would be playing. In the first sentence the ...
Boris's user avatar
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Is the following sentence correct (future)?

I'm working on a presentation concerning COVID-19. I wrote this sentence and I deem the usage of future perfect should be adequate in this context, however I'm not entirely sure whether it's correct ...
EdgarAllanPro's user avatar
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"You'll be hoping for a bit more from the new player, I suppose." Why the future continuous?

“You'll be hoping for a bit more from the new player, I suppose.” Why the future continuous? Wouldn't one rather use the future simple instead? If not: why not?
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Why is this sentence 'her train is leaving tomorrow at 10AM' correct? [closed]

The word 'tomorrow' implies that the sentence should be in the future sentence. Wouldn't the correct sentences be 'her train will leave tomorrow at 10AM' or 'her train will be leaving tomorrow at 10AM'...
Lee Zhiyuan's user avatar
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Why can’t we use the present continuous for the future with “be” itself by saying “I’m being there tomorrow”’?

The rule we were taught says that present continuous can be used for the future when the action implies “planning and arrangement”. And yet if I planned to be somewhere tomorrow, I still couldn’t say: ...
Pete Hollow's user avatar
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"Will you hang up?" or "Are you going to hang up?"

Phone call Person A: "You should get some sleep." Person B: (worried because they don't want person A to hang up)                    "Will you/Are you going to hang up?" What's ...
alexis's user avatar
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Is there such a thing as a future infinitive in English?

I am currently working on the English idiomatic phrase "Someone is said (to do/to be doing/to have done) something," and, try as I might, I cannot find any worthwhile piece of information ...
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"Will" not used for somebody else's intentions/plans

Page 576 of Collins English Usage reads When you are talking about your own intentions, you use will or be going to. When you are talking about someone else's intentions, you use be going to. I'll ...
GJC's user avatar
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Any difference in meaning/usage between the phrases "from now on" and "as of now"?

Is there a particular difference in meaning or usage between the phrases "as of now" and "from now on"? Could it be said that the first is more formal or is there more to this? ...
Cyrus's user avatar
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Present simple vs. "Would"

Swift code has a column limit of 100 characters. Except as noted below, any line that would exceed this limit must be line-wrapped as described in Line-Wrapping. - https://google.github.io/swift/ ...
user90726's user avatar
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Must things be arranged if I use Present Continuous for the future?

I know that I should use Present Continuous if I decided AND arranged to do some things. But I'm not sure about that AND. I am wondering if just one of the conditions is enough. For example: I am ...
ProstoCoder's user avatar
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What is the difference between "We are going to study" and "We are going to be studying"? [duplicate]

I want to know when we use "be going to" + be + ing?
user3284331's user avatar
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Question aboute a quote from a TV show where I've noticed two different tenses in the same sentence

there is a famous quote from Game of Thrones Episode 10 season 3 where a character says "Any man who must say, "I am the king" is no true king. I'll make sure you understand that when I'...
Mohammed Benbachir's user avatar
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Usage of "going to be" [closed]

Is the following grammatically correct? Hi All, Today I am going to be sending this model of living room
Karth's user avatar
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"Faster than" using with Future Simple

I'm just wondering if it is right to say that I'll learn English faster than they will translate this book =or I'll learn English earlier than they will translate this book I'm confused about ...
darya meoww's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
373 views

Matter of course use of future continuous

I am unable to fully grasp the matter of course use future continuous. The explanation says; we use future continuous to talk about something which will happen, if everything happens as we expect An ...
Reema Hashmi's user avatar
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2 answers
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Two words related to "anachronism" but having exclusive references to past and future

I'd like to identify two words related to anachronism: one having an exclusive association to past, and the other to future. According to Lexico, anachronism means: A thing belonging or appropriate ...
jsejcksn's user avatar
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1 answer
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"This article will discuss / discusses"

I would like if someone can help me with following "This article will discuss revaluation". I saw this title on a paper article and I really want to know why they used "will" here ...
shashika fernando's user avatar
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1 answer
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Present perfect continue & perfect

Could anyone tell me if my examples below is correct, I mean, tenses? "In fact, I've been thinking about keeping this path when I've finished business school..." "In fact, I've been thinking about ...
Companion S9's user avatar
1 vote
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perfect infinitive for future events

Boss tells his workers: (1) You are to finish this project by the end of next month. (2) You are to have finished this project by the end of next month. After a while, one of the workers tells his ...
Loviii's user avatar
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Mixing future tense with present tense to describe events in the future

I am translating a song from Russian to English. Original lyrics have a dreamy mood and shift (russian) tense from future to present, back and forth. This is an example that I made up, not the actual ...
Kadilov's user avatar
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I'm going to see a doctor tomorrow

Could you please tell me whether the sentences below mean the same to you? Group A: I'm going to play basketball tomorrow. I'm playing basketball tomorrow. I'll be playing basketball tomorrow. ...
Stephen Liu's user avatar
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How to refer to an upcoming month/season/year?

I wanted to know what is the correct way to address a certain day/month/season (I apologize in advance that I might have written the title wrong) For example, when referring to the summer of 2020 (...
Elia's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Everyday alternatives to future perfect tenses [AE]

Every grammar book has a section about Future Perfect tenses, but as this article and the comments point out, I don't really hear this type of language constructions from Americans (including in an ...
heluser's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
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Future tense in reported questions

Context: Boyfriend often stays out late. Girlfriend wants to say that she doesn't worry about this. Incorrect: "I don't usually ask him when he comes home" Correct: "I don't usually ask him ...
Martin Rose's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
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What are the "fine" differences in these lines and how not to get confused when thinking about them?

I don't see a team without Messi that reaches the top 3 in the world.(Present) or I don't see a team without Messi that can reach the top 3 in the world.(Present with "can") or I don't see a team ...
English--more exc than laws's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
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Any difference between these two (Present or Present Cont.)

"My husband will always invite his friends round for a drink just as I'm trying to put the kids to bed!" or "My husband will always invite his friends round for a drink just as I try to put the kids ...
English--more exc than laws's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
171 views

'Will' or 'Going to'?

I've got two sentences: And now I'll announce the winner of the competition. And now I'm going to announce the winner of the competition. In which sentence the structure is used more accurately? Are ...
Stacy's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
885 views

Why future tense? “This is the last time he’s going to stand me up” [closed]

Why does the second part of the phrase use future tense? Although the event “the last time” is happening now, we refer to it using future tense. It also works with “will:” “This is the last time he ...
chrssmth's user avatar
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1 answer
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Which future type (simple-vs-perfect) is correct for talking about an event that’s done?

Graduated, I started attending the degree course in Computer Science and Engineering in 2017, where I will graduate after two years with ⁹⁸⁄₁₁₀. Is a simple will graduate ok here, or should I instead ...
Mariano Caldara's user avatar
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0 answers
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Present simple in the future tense [duplicate]

I am confused about the usage of the present simple in the future tense. Doesn't it refer only to schedules? The following example deviates from this rule. We’re on holiday in Paris next week. (Taken ...
Batal96's user avatar
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Present continuous vs will + infinitive

The body of this question is divided into four sections: Exercise, Theoretical context, Answer and Questions. I believe this is the right site to ask given that this is a question about "word choice ...
Git Gud's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
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My daughter sits/ is sitting/ will sit for hours watchingTV

My daughter is sitting for hours watching TV My daughter sits for hours watching TV. My daughter will sit for hours watching TV. From the context it seems that the ...
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