Questions tagged [future]

In grammar, a future tense is a special verb form (inflection) that marks the event described by the verb as not having happened yet. Germanic languages like English have no future tense inflection, employing alternate mechanisms to indicate future events.

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60
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10answers
29k views

When should I use “shall” versus “will”?

Which is the correct use of these two words, and in which context should one be used rather than the other?
42
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3answers
998k views

When should I use “Would”, “Would have”, “Will”, and “Will have”?

I hope someone, once and for all, can clarify (with examples) the difference in usage of will vs. would vs. would have vs. will have.
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13answers
3k views

Why do I instinctively want to use the present tense with a conditional?

My boss is not a native speaker of English, so he often asks me to correct his writing. The problem is, he wants me to explain why I make changes, and doesn't accept "it just sounds better that way" ...
25
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3answers
4k views

When did periphrastic tenses stop being tenses?

English sometimes has several different ways of expressing the same thing. For example, it can form a possessive either by using an old case inflection: The dog’s tail was always wagging. Or it can ...
23
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6answers
31k views

Future tense in conditional clauses

All the textbooks I have ever come across during the course of my studying English emphasize that future tense should not be used in conditional clauses. For example, If it rains in the evening, ...
19
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2answers
30k views

Why do we say “It's time we ate” and not “It's time we eat”?

Why do we use the simple past but not the present or future in the following expressions: Don't you think it's time we went a little further Don't you think it's time we ate Don't you ...
19
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4answers
100k views

Is “this Monday” or “next Monday” the correct way to refer to the very next Monday in the future? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What day is next Tuesday? When I refer to the very next Monday that will occur in the future, I say "next Monday". Some colleagues refer to it as "this Monday", with "next ...
17
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4answers
148k views

“Will be doing” vs. “will do”

What's the difference between: I will be eating cakes tomorrow. I will eat cakes tomorrow. And, when should I use the first form?
17
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2answers
56k views

“The train will leave” vs. “is going to leave” vs. “leaves” vs. “is leaving”

From the grammatical point of view all are correct, just the meaning are different, please bring your clarification, thank you. The Train will leave at 10:00 tomorrow morning. The Train is ...
15
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4answers
5k views

“going to” vs “will”

I know several questions were asked about the difference between "going to" and "will". Based on several answers (see, for instance, here, here and here), I understood that "will" is more spontaneous ...
13
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4answers
105k views

“will be able to” vs. “can”

Consider the following: He will be able to do it. He can do it. They mean the same thing, right? Can "can" replace "will be able to" in any sentence? What is the difference, if anything? Why ...
12
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5answers
16k views

“When I am 18, I will…” or “When I will be 18, I will…” [duplicate]

Should I say: When I am 18, I'll take my driving test or When I'll be 18, I'll take my driving test Which one is the correct sentence?
11
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2answers
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You won't catch the train if you don't/won't leave in time [closed]

You won't catch the train if you don't leave in time You won't catch the train if you won't leave in time I'm pretty sure the correct version is "You won't catch the train if you don't leave in ...
11
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5answers
12k views

When do I have to use 'will' instead of 'going to'?

Does going to only express an intention and will some kind of prediction that doesn't necessarily happen? EDIT: Thanks for all your answers. I asked this question because I always fail to complete ...
10
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3answers
31k views

Using “will” after “if”

I've been told that native-speakers don't ever use "will" after "if", and that saying it this way is a not-native style. So from the film (Harry Potter, pt5) I noticed a line that confused me. Look ...
9
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6answers
27k views

What tense is “If I were a bird, I could fly”

The sentence is not referring to any time past, present of future. It's just referring to an imaginary condition which has never existed and seemingly will never exist. Still, the sentence and other ...
9
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3answers
69k views

“Going to go” vs “going to”?

My significant other tells me that I'm not "going to go" to the shops, I'm "going to" the shops, and beats me mercilessly when I say that. Is this not correct? I might not be going to the shops until ...
9
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4answers
6k views

“In” vs. “after” for future talk

The class will be over in 10 minutes. The class will be over after 10 minutes. I know the first is correct but why?
9
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4answers
2k views

Analogue of “most recent” for events in the future

In the context of a listing of events that are time-based, it is common to use "Most Recent" to describe a listing of events ordered by date, in descending order, with the upper limit being today's ...
9
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1answer
2k views

“You were already having been going to do that!”

From one of the Futurama episodes: Farnsworth A: You people and your slight differences disgust me. I'm going home. Where's that blue box with our universe in it? Farnsworth 1: Oh, you'...
8
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3answers
32k views

“If I go..” vs. “If I will go..” referring to the future [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Future tense in conditional clauses Which one is correct? option 1: If I go there, I can meet her or option 2: If I will go there, I can meet her I clearly remember, ...
8
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7answers
46k views

What’s the difference between “Are you going” and “Will you go”?

What’s the difference between these two alternatives: Are you going to England this summer? Will you go to England this summer?
8
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4answers
80k views

“I am going to attend” vs “I am attending”

Which of these two statements seems to be more appropriate? I am attending a meeting tomorrow. I am going to attend a meeting tomorrow. I am quite not sure which one to use.
8
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2answers
475 views

Why does the King James Bible say “I shall not want” and then “I will fear no evil.”

I have a question relating to the use of "shall" in the Bible. Before asking this question I read the entire Wikipedia article on Shall and will, and have ended up more confused than when I began. ...
6
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7answers
6k views

Is the use of future tense (especially “will” and “shall”) going out of grammar?

My English teacher taught us that there is no such thing called "future tense" in existence. Instead we were asked to use present indefinite tense. He said that we should use "I am to go to London" ...
6
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5answers
96k views

“Will graduate” vs. “will be graduated” vs. “is going to graduate”

Which of the following sentences are correct? He will graduate in May. He will be graduated in May. He is going to graduate in May. Issue 1: Is the second one grammatical? Issue 2: There ...
6
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2answers
3k views

Is “will never have been” valid English?

I was reading this phrase "will never have been" and I was wondering what grammatical structure does it belong to / is it grammatical? I'm not sure why but it sounds weird. What is the difference ...
6
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3answers
2k views

Can the verb “wish + that clause” express open possibility?

We often use "wish + that clause" to express a past/present counterfactual statement or a future unlikely event (i.e. remote possibility): I wish I hadn't quit my job. (But I quit my job.) I ...
6
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1answer
2k views

Question about the future “tense”

My daughter, who is in the 4th grade, was asked to answer questions about the following sentence: What time can you meet us at the school on Tuesday? She was asked questions about the usage of can ...
6
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1answer
6k views

Speculative conditional: Why does it use the past tense or past perfect tense?

We use simple past to state a hypothetical present situation that we would like to speculate about (If they were here, I would be happy), past perfect for a hypothetical past (had they been here, I ...
6
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3answers
2k views

Present tense for future events

Why does it sound perfectly natural to say Our flight leaves tomorrow at 6pm but weird to say It rains tomorrow at 6pm? What kind of scenario, if any, could make the rain sentence sound natural?
6
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5answers
35k views

“It is to be discussed”, what is the infinitive doing in this sentence?

It is to be discussed. Is be + infinitive forming the future tense here? You are to be dressed and ready by 8:00. I was thinking it's almost commanding (or speaking of a command) but this doesn'...
6
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2answers
3k views

Make “will have been going to go” correct

Is there a situation or question where the phrase will have been going to go is the best, most natural, or clearest response (or included in said response)? I'm asking this probably somewhat silly ...
6
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2answers
37k views

Can we use should /would and /could in Future perfect tense

I would have finished my home work by evening . He should have been more careful. Can these be used as future perfect tense ?
6
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4answers
3k views

Can the Future Perfect be used in a main clause of a conditional sentence that has a stative/non-action verb in the if-clause?

A student asked me this question today about a sentence like: (1) If Canada's population is 40 million, the Canadian economy will have been more dynamic. I was asked if it corresponded, in a future ...
5
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3answers
11k views

“… is about to …” vs. “… is going to …”

I found that is about to is used in the following sentence of the news article titled “Tech belt sees hiring surge” in The Boston Globe. “The company is about to go on a hiring spree, from ...
5
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3answers
2k views

“Will” and “Going To”. What are the real differences of the colloquial usage of them?

I'm from Brasil and here we study the differences of using "Will" and "Going to" to talk about the future. But it is usually very confusing because we have a different kind of conjugation that uses no ...
5
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2answers
10k views

Can “found” be used, as it is in this sentence, in the future tense?

For example, After several years, Rubin left to found Danger, Inc. Is this grammatically correct?
5
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4answers
10k views

Differences between ways to express future actions

I asked this question on a different site but I haven't gotten a useful answer. Could you tell me the difference in meaning between these sentences? Do you think you will visit them next week? ...
5
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3answers
867 views

Future tense usage: “When you see it …”

I wonder why the phrase is "When you see it you will shit brix," and not "When you will see it you will shit brix." Is the version with two will incorrect? What grammar rule says that you should not ...
5
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1answer
232 views

Is it appropriate to omit “will not be”?

Often, someone will say: I'm not living in a senior's home! When the intended meaning is: I will not be living in a senior's home! Is this acceptable?
5
votes
1answer
4k views

Is every sentence in a tense?

I know that "tense" indicates time. If that is true, then not every sentence can be indicated of its tense. Please review these sentences: "If I could go to the market , I must have taken breakfast (...
5
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3answers
12k views

“will you be going home” vs. “will you go home”

What's the difference between saying; Will you be going home this summer? Will you go home this summer? Are there any differences between these in written or spoken English?
5
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3answers
190 views

“get” or “is” regarding the future

Which of the following would be correct? Is it a question of dialect? "If this question gets answered, ..." "If this question is answered, ..." (Inspired by this answer.)
4
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3answers
26k views

Future Tense of Modal Verbs

All normal verbs can be conjugated in the future tense. e.g. I know, I will know. I do, I will do. But I have noticed that we cannot conjugate the modal verb can in the future tense. can, I ...
4
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5answers
8k views

Is the conditional a mood or a tense?

Is the conditional a mood or a tense? I've heard it described in both ways. It seems more like a mood as it is often lumped with hypothetical constructions and the subjunctive mood. I could see it ...
4
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1answer
21k views

Is phrase “will you be needing …” correct?

I'm curious about this phrase Will you be needing [...] ? It seems gramatically correct; I am also fine with "need" used in continuous time. But I'm wondering if it is used in spoken language... ...
4
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4answers
947 views

Can I use future tense here?

I know future tense cannot be used in time clauses. I would like to know, is the following incorrect? You have to launch the game and quit the game before the file will show up. I think it is as I ...
4
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3answers
37k views

How would you use “can” in a future sentence?

If you purchase this then you will be able to do that. How can I write the quoted statement using can?
4
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6answers
6k views

“Will be/would have been home tomorrow”

Which is correct? He promised that he will be home tomorrow. He promised that he would have been home tomorrow.