Questions tagged [frequency-analysis]

When looking into the etymology of a word or phrase, it can often be interesting to see how multiple phrases develop over time and compared to each other. N-grams can be used to visualise the occurrence of words and phrases over time and compared to each other.

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5
votes
2answers
123 views

'The phrase “cute puppy,”is not considered a collocation.' Is this correct?

I am a data scientist who has a question about collocations based on a book I am reading. The book is "Feature Engineering for Machine Learning: Principles and Techniques for Data Scientists" by ...
2
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1answer
59 views

In man's stead: Downturn in usage of 'man' and its replacement

For the past century the usage of man has declined; it's decline quickened around 1970. These downturns make sense and correspond to a movement to use more gender neutral language. What is replacing ...
5
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1answer
180 views

Where have all the erections gone?

I was experimenting with Google's ngram tool, and came upon this curious result: My assumption would have been with the more open attitudes towards discussion of sex, usage for "erection" would have ...
-1
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1answer
300 views

Unexpected Google Ngram for “wifi” [closed]

If we look at the word "internet", we can see that it was virtually unused until around 1990. Next, if we look at the word "wifi" we can see that there was a huge jump in around 2000. My question is ...
22
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2answers
3k views

The “F-word” in N-gram Viewer

I was simply fiddling with Ngram viewer when my apparently naughty mind made me type the (real) "F-word" onto the text field, (the time was also chosen randomly, (1750-to-1993)), the results baffled ...