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Questions tagged [forms-of-address]

Use this tag for questions about prescribed forms of titles, for example Mrs, Doctor, Sir, Her Royal Highness, The Most Honourable, etc.

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What are the plural equivalents of Messrs for Ms, Miss & Mrs? [duplicate]

Mr. smith and Mr. Jones can be expressed as Messrs. Smith and Jones. How can Ms. Smith and Ms. Jones, or Miss Smith and Miss Jones, or Mrs. Smith and Mrs. Jones respectively be so consolidated?
TylerDurden's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
73 views

What is the proper word for a surname from a previous marriage? [duplicate]

Let's say that Jane Doe marries David Jones, divorces him and then marries John Smith. During the first marriage, we say that she is Jane Jones née Doe and the same (Jane Smith née Doe) during the ...
gglazer's user avatar
  • 13
25 votes
1 answer
2k views

Can "né" or "née" be used to refer to a religious's secular name?

Is "né" (masculine) or "née" (feminine) ever used to refer to the secular name of a religious (i.e., monk or nun)? For example: Sr. Mary Dominic (née Jill Smith) or Br. Raphael ...
Geremia's user avatar
  • 722
12 votes
2 answers
3k views

What is a word for when a derogatory form of address is used affectionately?

Is there a word for when a derogatory title or form of address is used affectionately? For example, nigger is highly offensive, but some friends address each other with that word. Perhaps I'm thinking ...
Geremia's user avatar
  • 722
2 votes
0 answers
47 views

What is the etymology or history of "Your" for addressing a noble?

There are several ways of noble addressing, such as: Third person - female (Her) Third person - male (His) Second person (Your) e.g : Your Highness But, what are the meanings behind that? Why it ...
Jastria Rahmat's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
127 views

What are the suitable honorifics that distinguish between a man and his father?

Suppose, for instance, that a man (John Smith) and his father are both present in a conversation and that the speaker would like to address each of them individually. Suppose also that the ...
Anthony's user avatar
  • 170
0 votes
1 answer
60 views

What to change Caucasian to on forms? [closed]

I recently was called for jury duty in Wisconsin and was surprised to see Caucasian as a race choice. I called the clerk and she said most people check other and write white. What other designation ...
SBee's user avatar
  • 9
0 votes
2 answers
1k views

Mrs and Mr His Full Name

My father’s name is Piyush Singh and my mother’s name is Seema Singh. My question is whether referring to them as Mrs and Mr Piyush Singh wrong.
Isha Singh's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

compound noun versus direct address

If I said the following words, "I will watch a movie today only if I take care of the dust devil." How can the listener know that I am saying "dust devil" versus addressing the ...
Indira Singh's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
1k views

Honorifics: Is there a proper differentiation between salutation, address and title?

I'm currently working on technical system which needs to differentiate parts of an honorific. Reading articles and explanations on this subject is a little frustrating as title, address and salutation ...
Texec's user avatar
  • 1
3 votes
1 answer
3k views

Formal title/honorific for a lawyer

Let's say there is a lawyer named Sue Smith. She could be referred to as Ms. Smith, but is there a different formal prepended honorific specific to lawyers? Particularly when addressing one directly.
Jason C's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
2k views

How would you capitalize sister-in-law as a form of address?

I'm editing a chapter of a novel translated from Chinese, where kinship terms are often used as a form of address replacing a name. In this case, the speaker is referring to another woman as "...
Mimishijie's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
231 views

Different forms of addressing parents

In my language there is an older form in which you use kinship term in the middle of a sentence, in which normally you would use "you". Here's how this would look translated to English Normal -> "Dad,...
user385889's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
228 views

Is "Hello/OK Boomers" disparaging?

Last year I read that American Congressperson Ocasio Cortez aka AOC (OK Boomer) used the term to bring to task some older members of US Congress who seemed to be ignoring the wishes and desires of the ...
Cascabel_StandWithUkraine_'s user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
965 views

Addressing a person by their last name only [closed]

I've seen a couple of instances where someone is addressed exclusively by their last name (not like "Mr. X" but only "X"). The most prominent example is perhaps MacGyver, whose first name (Angus) is ...
Christian Seifert's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
526 views

What does “Mr/s” mean, in a greeting?

I received a note addressed to “Mr/s Eric [my last name].” Both on the front of the envelope and in the greeting of the message. Is this shorthand for Mr & Mrs?
Eric's user avatar
  • 869
4 votes
2 answers
3k views

What would be a gender neutral form of address as a highschool teacher? (British English)

In the UK, it's very common for secondary school teachers to be referred to as one of the following: Sir/Miss Miss/Mrs/Mr Surname This would be both when the students are talking about the teacher, ...
user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
13k views

"My Mom" vs "Mom" Usage

Context: When my brother and I have a conversation that refers to our mother , we usually use "my mom" to refer to her. For example: "Have you talked to my mom today?" is a common ...
ZeRaTuL_jF's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
135 views

In an English-speaking country, how would a household employee address their female employer? [closed]

Would it be Miss? Mistress? Madam? Or, should she be young (underage and/or unmarried): Young Miss? Young Mistress? Young Lady? Young Madam? EDIT (to clarify): How would a butler, chef, chauffeur, ...
ConanG's user avatar
  • 179
10 votes
2 answers
2k views

Ad­dress­ing boys and girls dif­fer­ently in (Vic­to­rian?) English schools

In Jane Eyre by Char­lotte Brontë I read: “Burns” (such it seems was her name: the girls here were all called by their sur­names, as boys are else­where)... So my ques­tion is: were there (or ...
v_2e's user avatar
  • 201
1 vote
2 answers
211 views

How to refer to a deceased widow?

For a ring ceremony invitation, I want to refer to my grandmother, who died after my grandfather and so she died as a widow. How do I refer to her in the invitation card? For example: Late Mrs. ...
Nilam Naghor's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
2k views

How would one address a female priest in the Anglican Community?

How would one address a female priest in the Anglican Community? What do you call a female priest in the Episcopal church?
Michael Owen Sartin's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
6k views

Sir or Mr with first name only [duplicate]

How can I refer to a man using his first name while showing some respect? Can I say "Good morning, Sir William or Mr William" like Monsieur in French?
Anne Alexandre's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
10k views

How to address a former president in a letter?

I would like to ask how to address a former president on a letter. Should I write "Dear Mr. Obama" or "Dear Former President Obama"? I found this information: Begin the letter. Although style ...
Mango Gummy's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
3k views

Even you or you too? [closed]

A naked man was walking in a jungle. Seeing him, all the animals ran away. The zebra asked the king lion: you too/ even you?" The lion replied," My friend, Keep the joke aside. That's a strange ...
Abcd's user avatar
  • 19
-2 votes
2 answers
79k views

Mam vs Ma'am difference [closed]

Is Mam slowly becoming a substitute for Ma'am as a lot of people don't know the difference between the two.
Vishal Sharma's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
1k views

What do you call the process of formally addressing someone by using honorifics?

My native language is Macedonian, and in my language, we have a special term that describes the process of formally addressing someone. The idea is that you treat that person in plural instead of in ...
aleksandaril's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
599 views

What's a good title for firefighters?

When addressing police or jail staff, a lot of times you address them as "[Rank] [Last Name]", such as "Sgt. Smith" or "Lt. Reynolds". If you don't know their rank though, you can resort to "Officer [...
Panzercrisis's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
48 views

Business formalities [closed]

I addressed a customer as Dear “X” and replied to me by using only my first name Dimitris. Do I need to reply the same or to keep the expression Dear “X”?
Dimitris's user avatar
8 votes
5 answers
24k views

Are capital letters used for terms of endearment like "Honey" and "Sweetheart"?

When writing a sentence (for a book/story) do the endearments Honey, Sweetheart, etc. get capital letters? e.g. "Are you ready, Honey?" or "Are you ready, honey?"
Busy Typist's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
13k views

Do you use "to whom it may concern:" with "Dear Mr./Mrs" or only pick one?

I've seen example where people use both, for example: To Whom It May Concern: Dear Mr., I am writing to apply... OR is the correct usage this: To Whom It May Concern: I am writing to apply... ...
user2472480's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
5k views

How to address in a formal email [closed]

Can I address Good Morning / Afternoon after addressing 'Dear XYZ,' in a formal email. Thanks Ankit
Ankit's user avatar
  • 13
-2 votes
2 answers
963 views

Formal way to address a woman [duplicate]

I don't want to use miss. What are my other alternatives? I cannot go with Mrs because I don't want to have to use her name. Is it Madam then? It sounds so french and old-fashioned. "Bonjour madame"....
Miak's user avatar
  • 1
6 votes
2 answers
301 views

Mister Captain, will your ship sink?

"President Smith may veto the bill." "Mr. President, will you veto the bill?" "Captain Smith's ship is in danger of sinking." "Mr. Captain, will your ship sink?" "Captain, will your ship sink?" "...
Michael Hardy's user avatar
42 votes
6 answers
22k views

What is the plural of Mrs?

If I were speaking of three sisters, young girls, whose family name was "Holmsworth", I might say The Misses Holmsworth. But if I were speaking collectively of Donald Trump's three wives, the present ...
WS2's user avatar
  • 64.7k
18 votes
8 answers
230k views

Can "Mr", "Mrs", etc. be used with a first name?

Is it correct to use Mr/Mrs with a first name?
Roger S Pearce's user avatar