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Questions tagged [for-to-complementizers]

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0answers
50 views

Can we have non-finite clauses with overt subject without “for”?

I read the following in a comment to an answer to another post of mine: "What’s the difference between expect for things to improve and expect things to improve? Is that for part of expect for, or is ...
3
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3answers
157 views

Are these PPs or non-finite clauses – or something else entirely?

I'm wondering about the construction for [NP] to [VP], as illustrated in the following examples: (1) I waited for you to come here (2) He arranged for me to go there (3) For him to do that took ...
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2answers
2k views

“Important for someone to do” vs. “important that someone does”

As I know, there is no difference in meaning between the following two sentences. It is not important for you to eat good food. It is not important that you eat good food. But I believe ...
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1answer
2k views

Do “it is time for someone to do something” and “it is time someone did something” mean the same thing? [duplicate]

I know that It is time (understood: for the speaker or for a group of people including the speaker) to do something. and It is time I or we did something. do not mean the same thing: the first is ...
2
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1answer
127 views

“For IE (to) render them”

Which sentence is correct? I just put   in the empty elements for IE to render them. I just put   in the empty elements for IE render them. The render will be processed by ...
-1
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2answers
108 views

What sentences say “for [infinitive]”?

I have the following phrase, or something like it: That's for to learn grammar. I guess it's a common kind of construction, if confusing / malformed. Could I read it as missing an elided e.g. name? ...
1
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1answer
57 views

What does this question ask? What is the meaning of “for the law” in this sentence?

The sentence is: "Is it ever justifiable for the law to treat some people as inferior to others?" Can anyone explain the meaning of this question? I am confused about especially the "for the law" ...
3
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1answer
469 views

How does the word “to” function with an infinitive?

I've gone through all the questions and answers on infinities and although they explain whether or not an infinitive should be marked or bare with certain words, nowhere can I find an explanation as ...