Questions tagged [for-to-complementizers]

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omission of semantic subject

Toni Morrison began writing when she was in college, but she did not produce anything good enough to publish for many years. Her troubled marriage, divorce, and life as a single mother made it even ...
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2answers
56 views

Complement of the object?

I'm reading Verbs of Incomplete Prediction in my grammar. It says that certain Transitive verbs take, beside an object, a complement to complete their predication. I have understood almost everything ...
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0answers
25 views

when should “to” be preposition or be part of infinitive? [duplicate]

When "to" is a preposition: I look forward to receiving your letter. When "to" is part of the infinitive: I expect you to come over. My question is, how could I know whether "to" is a preposition or ...
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4answers
279 views

Is 'to resign' an object or subject complement in 'The teacher wishes to resign'?

The teacher (S) wishes (V) to resign It is no doubt that 'to resign' is a complement of something, but is it a complement of the noun The teacher or the verb wishes? Subject complement [analysis 1]:...
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1answer
61 views

Matrix clause or infinitival clause?

What is the function of “the doctor” in the following sentences? Is it a constituent of the matrix clause or of the infinitival clause? I wanted the doctor to examine my daughter. I persuaded the ...
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0answers
114 views

Can we have non-finite clauses with overt subject without “for”?

I read the following in a comment to an answer to another post of mine: "What’s the difference between expect for things to improve and expect things to improve? Is that for part of expect for, or is ...
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3answers
225 views

Are these PPs or non-finite clauses – or something else entirely?

I'm wondering about the construction for [NP] to [VP], as illustrated in the following examples: (1) I waited for you to come here (2) He arranged for me to go there (3) For him to do that took ...
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2answers
368 views

“For + subj. + to” infinitive to indicate purpose

I would like more information about this type of construction. Good examples escape me at the moment, but it would be something along the lines of: These conditions need to be satisfied for this ...
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1answer
61 views

What does this question ask? What is the meaning of “for the law” in this sentence?

The sentence is: "Is it ever justifiable for the law to treat some people as inferior to others?" Can anyone explain the meaning of this question? I am confused about especially the "for the law" ...
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2answers
242 views

What sentences say “for [infinitive]”?

I have the following phrase, or something like it: That's for to learn grammar. I guess it's a common kind of construction, if confusing / malformed. Could I read it as missing an elided e.g. name? ...
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1answer
587 views

How does the word “to” function with an infinitive?

I've gone through all the questions and answers on infinities and although they explain whether or not an infinitive should be marked or bare with certain words, nowhere can I find an explanation as ...
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1answer
3k views

Do “it is time for someone to do something” and “it is time someone did something” mean the same thing? [duplicate]

I know that It is time (understood: for the speaker or for a group of people including the speaker) to do something. and It is time I or we did something. do not mean the same thing: the first is ...
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2answers
2k views

“Important for someone to do” vs. “important that someone does”

As I know, there is no difference in meaning between the following two sentences. It is not important for you to eat good food. It is not important that you eat good food. But I believe ...
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1answer
127 views

“For IE (to) render them”

Which sentence is correct? I just put   in the empty elements for IE to render them. I just put   in the empty elements for IE render them. The render will be processed by ...