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Questions tagged [food]

Questions related to food, nutrients, dishes, drinks and other things that humans and other animals consume for sustenance.

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0answers
32 views

Generic term for Food and Recipe [on hold]

I am searching for a generic term for recipe and food. Examples for food: Apple, Banana, Carrot Examples for Recipe: Lasagne, Pizza, Burger Background: A food has properties like: Name, ...
24
votes
4answers
4k views

Is there a familial term for apples and pears?

The term Citrus Fruit covers oranges, lemons, and grapefruits; all of which are very similar in skin & flesh. Is there a similar term to cover apples and pears (outside of Cockney rhyming slang)? ...
10
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2answers
144 views

What's the etymology of the military slang word “jippo” meaning gravy?

My late grandfather who served in WWII always used to refer to gravy as jippo and it has passed down into common usage by the family, while there are sources which confirm this meaning, I cannot find ...
28
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6answers
5k views

Is it technically correct to call an almond drink “milk” in English?

For the past few years in Italian supermarkets, we have all sorts of "healthy" and "organic" alternatives to dairy milk for vegans and for consumers who are lactose intolerant. For example; soy milk (...
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1answer
40 views

How do you call food that shreds a lot of crumbs? [closed]

Food that shreds many tiny particles when you bite it. For example, cookies or bread toast.
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5answers
5k views

What's the verb for “cooking” pizza?

If you make pizza from scratch and put it in your oven, what's the most natural/predominant verb for what you're doing to the pizza? Cooking? Baking? Firing? Something else? None of these sounds ...
12
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7answers
3k views

For native speakers, what are dumplings? [closed]

When I started to learn English, my teacher told me dumplings is a translation for Chinese 饺子 (a food, also widely found in Japan or Korea). But after a few years, I was surfing on the internet and ...
2
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3answers
145 views

Scimitar or Cimitar?

I'm a cook at a restaurant. My liberal arts education combined with a classical culinary education helps me figure out most stuff on my own, but occasionally I'm unsure. The grey area, fuzzy logic. ...
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0answers
32 views

“In stock” for (cheap) food? [closed]

For (cheap) food vendors (e.g., food trucks), what do they say if the food item is available? I believe restaurants say "on the menu", but what do cheaper vendors say? I believe when an item isn't ...
0
votes
4answers
223 views

Not specifying the amount that you eat/drink

You don't need to specify the amount that you eat/drink for some things: I drink cranberry juice. I eat fried chicken. I eat bread with butter. You can't do this for other things: I ...
6
votes
1answer
158 views

What would you call the distinction between e.g. 'cow'/'beef', 'pig'/'pork'? [closed]

I'm looking for a term to denote the distinction between the name of an animal when it's alive, and the name of the same animal when it serves as food. If such a term exists, I imagine it belongs to ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

What do you call honey harvested by beekeepers? [closed]

There are kinds of honey called forest honey, cliff honey, dwarf honey etc. What is honey farmed by beekeepers called?
1
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1answer
1k views

My favorite food is apples. Is it ok? [duplicate]

My favorite food is apples. Or my favorite food are apples.
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0answers
59 views

Is there a term for a recipe inside a recipe?

Many recipes often have a "sub-recipe" inside of them. Such as a cake recipe having a separate section for the icing. Other recipes will have a sub-recipe for the sauce. Is there a formal cooking term ...
3
votes
3answers
97 views

Is there any word for the the feeling/act when the food is so tasty that you close your eyes and chew it slowly?

I'm just looking for a word by which one can explain the moment / feeling / act of closing your eyes and chewing your food slowly with taking enjoying every part of your food. I'm looking for a noun, ...
28
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14answers
13k views

What do native English speakers call chips/fries that are no longer crispy? [closed]

I am looking for a term commonly used to describe chips (BrE)/fries (AmE) that are no longer crispy, and need to be re-fried to give them back their crispiness and proper taste. It should be quite a ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Word for small plastic takeaway cups for dressings, salsa, etc [duplicate]

What is the name for the tiny clear takeaway/to-go cups with snap-on lids they give you at a restaurant for your entree's sauces? The waitress told me like 10 times but I can't remember the next day. ...
0
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1answer
1k views

What is the one word description for someone who likes spicy food?

If a bibliophile likes books, then what is the -phile word for someone who enjoys eating spicy food?
2
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2answers
1k views

Is there a single term to cover 'meat, fish and poultry'?

I have been searching online for a term that covers 'meat, fish & poultry' but have had no luck. Just wondering if anyone knows of a term? Context: If I was to sell a curry for example but ...
0
votes
3answers
200 views

Where are onions “melted”?

I was recently at a pub in Germany with a group of native English speakers (I am a native German speaker) and we encountered the phrase "melted onions" on the menu. "Beef steak with melted onions and ...
2
votes
3answers
534 views

Is there a term for using color to describe taste or flavor, instead of using the actual flavor?

For example, if someone says "this tastes purple" instead of saying it tastes like grape, or if asked what flavor of Gatorade you prefer you answer with, "blue". It also seems common with candy and ...
13
votes
5answers
1k views

Crush the spearhead leek

I've often wondered why the pungent plant called garlic is a mass noun. If I look at its etymology, I see it is derived from Old English. Old English gārlēac, from gār ‘spear’ (because the shape of ...
0
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1answer
66 views

Is there a word for nut, berry, & seed bars?

Bars without oats, but rather only nuts dried berries and other seeds are increasingly common nowadays, but is there a word for them? If not in English, then maybe there is a word that could be ...
11
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4answers
2k views

There's a product described as “Omaha Steaks Burgers” is this proper English? [closed]

There is a commercial that has the description, Omaha Steaks Burgers, it drives me crazy. It sounds wrong, when I read it, it looks wrong. It seems improper to me. Old-fashioned burgers just ...
1
vote
1answer
132 views

If I were to place Dine-in, Takeaway, and Delivery into a category, what would be an appropriate title for the category?

So I have an application which displays a list of restaurants to a user. This list of restaurants can be filtered by cuisine, features etc. I want this list to be able to filtered by dine-in, takeaway,...
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0answers
69 views

Why are all food storage metals called tin?

In British English, we might open a tin of beans and drink a tinny, bake something in a cake tin, and wrap the leftovers in tin foil. These things are all made of different metals. Why are they all ...
71
votes
8answers
15k views

How can I order eggs “over hard” in the UK?

I've recently made a couple of trips to the London area, and I've had a terrible time trying to convince the hotel breakfast cooks that I want my eggs fried "over hard", meaning that both the white ...
8
votes
1answer
259 views

Might the word “hushpuppy” be a corruption of a Native American word?

I have always doubted the traditional explanation of the origin of the word "hushpuppy" since the word sounds like a borrowing from a Native American language. The 'explanation' that it comes from ...
2
votes
0answers
213 views

Etymology and distinction between pottage and potage

At dictionary.com, there is a bit of an inconsistency in the origins and meaning of two historical variants of the same (probably French) word: Potage noun, French Cookery. 1. soup, especially ...
0
votes
2answers
158 views

What is it called when we speak of foods using brand names? [duplicate]

I am wondering about the phenomenon of brand names being commonly used to describe certain foods. For example, I recently heard the phrase “to eat cheetos“. Other examples could be to eat/drink... ...
2
votes
0answers
875 views

Why in the U.S. sometimes the doughnut is called sinker? [closed]

Why in the U.S. sometimes the doughnut is called sinker? I'm not familiar with U.S.'s food or slang.
43
votes
7answers
6k views

Is “seafood” inclusive of “seaweed”?

I told Korean friends not to label a (non-commercial) package of seaweed as "seafood", but it is from the sea and it is food, so now I'm not sure. How common is it to refer to "seaweed" as "seafood"...
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votes
2answers
545 views

How did an egg and cheese dish come to be known as “Woodchuck(s)”?

Our family just finished our traditional post-Easter dinner of colorful Woodchucks, and once again I am wondering about the origin of this odd recipe name. Some searching on the internet has turned up ...
2
votes
1answer
143 views

Etymology of “fox grape”

Various American grape varieties are commonly called "fox grapes". I was under the impression that this term originated from the term "foxy" to describe the aroma of wines produced from these grapes, ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

In UK, do you say, or used to say, 'candy' to mean 'boiled sweet'?

In UK, do you say, or used to say, 'candy' to mean 'boiled sweet'(Br) = 'hard candy'(Am)? I found this definition on some dictionaries, but except Pocket Oxford, they're all British and rather old (...
8
votes
1answer
5k views

“I like apples” vs “I like apple”?

If I understand it correctly, nouns for fruits (and certain types of foodstuffs, such as pizza) are used as mass nouns if thought of as "food substance", rather than "portions". So is it correct that ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

What is the English equivalent of the Telugu word 'Thalimpu'?

In most of the Indian recipes for dish items, we do heat up the pan with some oil, put some mustard seeds, cumin seeds, etc., and let them pop. What is the process called in English? In the Telugu ...
2
votes
3answers
384 views

What is the name of the amount of food that is ready to be cooked for a meal?

A meal is the amount of food that is ready to be eaten on regular occasions. What is the name of such amount of food that is ready to be cooked, one step before it is actually a meal? According to the ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

Why “smashed avocado” rather than “mashed avocado”?

In the context of gastronomy, what is the difference, if any, between "smashed" and "mashed"? I'm familiar with "mashed" being used, such as in "mashed potato", but hadn't heard of "smashed" being ...
26
votes
10answers
10k views

How to describe very tasty and probably unhealthy food

I'm looking for a word to describe food that is very tasty and unhealthy/fattening, probably served in oversize portions. For example: a mountain of pancakes with lots of butter, chocolate, fruit and ...
3
votes
4answers
501 views

Is there any connection between 'biscuit' and 'bisque'?

I grew up in Australia being told: We don't eat cookies - they are biscuits! Now you could split hairs on the distinctions, but culturally this was important at the time. Now there is a French ...
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1answer
131 views

A word for “one who eats peppers” [closed]

I am looking for a word that means a person who eats peppers of any fruit. For those who don't know what a pepper is, here's the definition, from Google: a pungent, hot-tasting powder prepared ...
10
votes
7answers
5k views

Is there a word in-between “vegetarian” and “non-vegetarian”? [closed]

Vegetarian, non-vegetarian and in-between...? Is there a word in-between "vegetarian" and "non-vegetarian"? Is there a different type of style of eating? I want to know the word in English.
3
votes
1answer
353 views

Meaning of nonpareil related to (savory) foodstuffs

I've looked up the usual places for meanings of nonpareil and have found unequalled and also its usage to mean small confectionary. However, I see it used on almonds, others have reported it being ...
1
vote
2answers
138 views

Is the term “krapfens” popular/well-known in English? [closed]

The word krapfens means "donuts": in Italy it is quite common to see it in German as well as in English; I guess that's because Italian borrows many original expressions from foreign languages. It ...
2
votes
4answers
266 views

Word for “secondary part of a dish that soaks up the sauce of the primary part”

A lot of dishes include a small amount of meat or fish or something else with a strong flavor, and then a large portion of rice or mashed potatoes or spaghetti, or something else that is comparatively ...
6
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2answers
629 views

If a “cooking show” is grammatical, why not a “cooking book”?

I enjoy cooking, and I've been told I'm quite a good cook. I have several cookery books 1 at home, mostly on Italian and British cooking, but not one is written by a famous cookery writer 2. I've ...
4
votes
2answers
764 views

Why is salt being referred to as “sodium”? [closed]

Why is salt referred to as "sodium" in nutrition facts (like on products) and similar documents in some parts of the world? Why is that nutrition facts labels in some parts of the world list salt ...
-1
votes
1answer
330 views

Fruit and nuts that come from a plant of a different name [closed]

Most fruit and nuts grow on a plant, bush, tree or palm of the same name. I can think of only two exceptions- grape (vine) and blackberry (bramble). Are there any others?
14
votes
11answers
5k views

A verb for “picking small bits of food from the tray or the main plate before it is served or others have started eating”

I am looking for a verb that means to pick small portions of food usually stealthily before it is served for everyone especially from the main plate. I believe it can be the same verb used when people ...