Questions tagged [flat-adverbs]

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8 votes
2 answers
2k views

"Don't take it personally" vs. "Don't take it personal"

I believe usage trumps authority when it comes to the rules of English. However, I also believe that errors are just errors. I keep hearing "ly" being left off of words even in common idioms....
candied_orange's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
57 views

Slow or slowly? [closed]

Is this correct: "I want to start slow, then gradually increase the time I exercise." Or should it say "slowly"?
lsavely's user avatar
  • 31
-1 votes
1 answer
53 views

Adverb vs. Adjective use [closed]

We typically use adverbs to describe verbs, but there are exceptions. Would you rather say 'You glow different' or 'You glow differently'? Are both acceptable?
curiouscat's user avatar
12 votes
1 answer
3k views

How to differentiate "slow" VS "slowly" both as adverbs

I understand the 2 words are very simple words in English until I came across this sentence below: "Please drive slow". I know it should be an adverb here, and I checked it up to find &...
Dai_Lizhi86's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
1k views

Cuts deep or cuts deeply

I'm editing an op-ed for a friend, and her title includes "the stigma cuts deeply". Sure, deeply can work adverbially here, but am I wrong to think that "deep" can also work? The ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
2k views

act weird/weirdly vs. act strange/strangely

According to this ngram, 'act weird' is much more productive than 'act weirdly', which is almost non-existent, but 'act strangely' is more productive than 'act strange', which is not non-existent at ...
listeneva's user avatar
  • 1,430
0 votes
2 answers
342 views

Isn’t "higher-priced products" with an adjective ungrammatical for the correct "more highly priced products" with an adverb?

The phrase higher-priced products is very common, but isn’t it grammatically incorrect? The adjective higher is being forced to servce as an adverb here, so the phrase should instead be more highly ...
Pixie's user avatar
  • 31
0 votes
0 answers
66 views

my bank just sent a statement titled: Banking Done Different [duplicate]

Is it ever correct to write Banking Done Different? I am surprised to find this printed at the top of my savings account statement
Joan Miner's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
80 views

What adjectives can be used as adverbs? [duplicate]

Are the following sentences acceptable to native speakers? I want it so bad. The children grew up happy and healthy. Jimmy works hard. He followed her quick. What adjectives can be used as adverbs? ...
wada's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
1 answer
73 views

Using adjective as adverb

I've heard a line in a song contained "...I slept peaceful on your shoulder...". Is this correct from a native speaker point of view? Is peaceful here an adverb without a -ly form, or does it relate ...
Zephyr's user avatar
  • 3
7 votes
2 answers
587 views

What exactly is a flat adverb? [duplicate]

I know that a flat adverb is an adverb that has the same form as its related adjective, but does that mean any adverb without the -ly suffix is grammatically correct? For instance, if I said I am “...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
453 views

Gingerly, the adjective and adverb

The adjective wary and adverb warily each have gingerly as a synonym, instead of the adjectival form being ginger. If it were ginger, I could also imagine the adverb being the flat ginger. I hesitate ...
J.G.'s user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
2k views

Why do we say "eat healthy" instead of "eat healthily"? [duplicate]

Why do we say "eat healthy" instead of "eat healthily", even though the latter is the only "correct" one, according to the comments in "eat healthy" or "eat healthily" What ...
MWB's user avatar
  • 1,316
0 votes
1 answer
3k views

Is "looked at me funny" correct grammar?

The following phrases: Looked at me funny Looking at me funny Don't sound grammatically correct, but I hear them as turns of phrase relatively frequently. It should be something like: Looked at me ...
Sam Holmes's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
113 views

"Victoria Tube line part shut hit by wet concrete flood" . Is this correct English?

Victoria Tube line part shut hit by wet concrete flood is the headline from a BBC headline @ http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-25862543. Which goes on to say: Part of the Victoria London ...
Italian Philosophers 4 Monica's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
2k views

Is 'white' an adverb in "the lamp will flash white"?

What is the role of 'white' in the following sentence? The lamp on the machine will flash white when you restart it. It seems like it is an adverb here, but is it possible to use colours as ...
d.alex's user avatar
  • 319
0 votes
6 answers
28k views

I read it wrong / wrongly?

You read an email and thought it meant B but later realizes it actually said A. In this scenario, can you say, "I read that email/sentence wrong" or should I use "wrongly"? How would a native speaker ...
Paul's user avatar
  • 109
3 votes
1 answer
640 views

"Endless" as an adverb without -ly?

My question concerns the following Siouxsie and the Banshees lyrics: Come let's take flight, let's quit this scene tonight Whilst they sleep on endless, in their wrecked designs Sleep on endless in ...
blimpse's user avatar
  • 33
6 votes
5 answers
32k views

"Walk slow" vs. "walk slowly" [duplicate]

I was wondering if walk slow and walk slowly are both correct or if there's a difference between them. English isn't my first language and I'm sure the rules I learned would only accept slowly as ...
John's user avatar
  • 177
-1 votes
1 answer
1k views

Adverbs - do they still exist? [duplicate]

Why do people say "I want it done fast"? Fast is modifying 'done' which is the past tense of a verb. Verbs are modified by adverbs - which end with 'ly'. They should say "I want it done quickly". A ...
Mark Tucker's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
8k views

Which one is right "Think bad of someone" or "Think badly of someone"?

In my opinion, "Think badly of someone" is right. But when I was watching a Vietnamese film with English subtitles "Think bad of me" was used.
Nguyen Ngoc Bich An's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
1k views

"how quicker" vs. "how much quicker"

I'm trying to settle a debate with my girlfriend. She says "how quicker" is incorrect and you should always use "how much quicker". Which of these is [more?] correct? See how quicker the cars flow ...
Swizec Teller's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
5k views

A question on 'full' Vs 'fully', both as 'adverbs'

In order to modify an adjective or adverb, we use an adverb in English, as in "completely insane" or "It went completely out of hand". Now 'full', though mainly used as an adjective, occurs in English ...
asef's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
2k views

When does one append "-ly"?

I am trying to understand the difference between adjectives that end in ‑ly compared with adjectives that do not end end in ‑ly. For example (the ones I would have chosen are bold): A tactical ...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
254 views

American use of "personal", "regular"

Frequently I hear Americans (admittedly mainly in TV/movies) say "personal" and "regular" in the following contexts: "Don't take it personal." "I like that he ...
OJFord's user avatar
  • 318
1 vote
4 answers
725 views

Quick or Quickly: “How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy” [duplicate]

Let’s say I have this title: How to Install a PHP Extension: Quick and Easy Should I say quick and easy or quickly and easily? Why?
user557108's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
6k views

As quick as we can?

Is it acceptable to say "We'll get back to you as quick as we can"? Is "quick" a flat adverb in this case?
Yarin's user avatar
  • 606
2 votes
2 answers
2k views

'solid' used as an adverb

The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th Edition contains the following (on the hyphenation or otherwise of compounds): 6.38: The trend in spelling compound words has been away from the use of hyphens; ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
2k views

Comparative adverbs

"Officially" (or so I believe) English doesn't have comparative adverbs (a single word rather than "more" + an adverb), but faster is in common usage as one, for example: Do it faster When ...
Bohemian's user avatar
  • 1,576
5 votes
1 answer
3k views

Using short adjectives as adverbs, such as "easy" & "short"

I know that some adjectives (such as easy & short) can be used as adverbs in some situations, but when can this happen and what adjectives does this apply to? This definitely works: "He stopped ...
Jakob Weisblat's user avatar
21 votes
12 answers
647k views

Which is correct: "drive safe" or "drive safely"?

When someone is going to drive their car somewhere, I always used to say "drive safely" to them. Recently I was told I should say "drive safe." (From: Would you ask someone to drive safe or to ...
user avatar
29 votes
7 answers
20k views

"Firstly" or "first"?

Which is more correct? How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. First, thy eyes gaze deep into my soul. Second,... or There are four reasons why all should hail the Hypno-Toad. Firstly, his ...
ptomato's user avatar
  • 1,568