Questions tagged [flapping]

Intervocalic flapping, tapping, or t-voicing, in which the consonant /t/ is pronounced as a flap consonant (often perceived as /d/), a phenomenon especially common in North American English.

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FLAP T has two versions?

everyone, my question is about the flap T. I'm not a native American English speaker, but I hear the difference between flap t in pretty (some natives pronounce it like the Spanish R, some like a soft ...
Plazma's user avatar
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Why are "all together" and "altogether" exact homophones in American English?

This question was inspired by the interesting discussion here: Why isn't the T in "relative" flapped? It seems like the adverb already and the two-word phrase all ready should be ...
Quack E. Duck's user avatar
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Super reduced pronunciation of the affix "anti"

Listen to this clip at 00:13 and 00:30, and you will hear the word antihistamine. The pronunciation of anti is super reduced, just like this post described. I think the IPA should be like this: /anə/. ...
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Do American pronounce "she looked at me" as /ʃiː lʊkt æt mi/ or /ʃiː lʊkd æt mi/?

Although some people say that flap-t [ɾ] is used if phonemic /t/ is between two vowels as in matter [ˈmædəɹ], I think that definition is incomplete because if phonemic /t/ occurs before a stressed ...
Tom's user avatar
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Why is there a flap allophone of /t/ but not of /k/ or /p/?

In English, there are three (phonemic) voiceless stops: /t/, /k/, /p/. In most if not all American accents, a /t/ between vowels (the first of which is usually stressed and the second unstressed) is ...
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Why doesn't the T of "lunatic" flap in American English?

I have never heard the T of "lunatic" become flap in American English. You can also listen to the data from Youglish. Compare "janitor" /ˈdʒænəɾɚ/ (Cambridge Dictionary gives /...
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Does English allow alveolar flap [ɾ] at the ends of syllables? If yes, how to syllabify?

Prompted by this question: How to syllabify “very” or “merry” etc in British English?, I found the linked question interesting and it was a very good question but it did not get much attention, ...
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Is this flapping?

https://youglish.com/getcid/19629243/Wouldn't/us I realized that I make a flapping sound [ɾ] when I pronounce "wouldn't". But I also realized that not every native speaker does that. Then I found ...
nene's user avatar
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Does 'd' actually flap?

Flapping or tapping, also known as alveolar flapping, intervocalic flapping, or t-voicing, is a phonological process found in many dialects of English, especially North American English, Australian ...
nene's user avatar
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Is it okay to flap "didn't" (and "wouldn't", "couldn't", "ridden")

I've tried to research this topic a lot and since I'm not a native English speaker, I can't tell whether it sounds "right" or not when you flap these words. I've found some examples on youtube of ...
Jorge Carvajal's user avatar
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The pronunciation shift of T to D in the United States

I'm from the United States and I have recently discovered that I don't pronounce the T as a soft D as other Americans do. Neither do most of the people in my area or my parents. I pronounce the word "...
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Why isn't the T in "relative" flapped?

One very common phenomenon in north-American English is T flapping when the T comes between two vowels (or semi-vowels, like the R sound) on an unstressed syllable. This "rule" is almost ...
David Haim's user avatar
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1 answer
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metal, meddle, mettle, medal pronunciation in American English

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English has the following phonetic symbols: meddle / ˈmedl; ˋmɛdl/ medal / ˈmedl; ˋmɛdl/ mettle / ˈmetl; ˋmɛtl/ metal / ˈmetl; ˋmɛtl/ ...
Sleeping On a Giant's Shoulder's user avatar
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strange pronunciation of /t/ before the word "the"

This has been bothering me for a long time. I know there is “stop t”, as we find in the word: wait But I’m still not sure about the /t/ before the word the in these phrases: lift the cat trust the ...
kal's user avatar
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Am I wrong when I think that I can hear the two different ways they pronounce "flap T"?

When I listen to the Beatles' "LET IT BE", I can distinctly hear that the first T is pronounced like Polish or Russian or Spanish "R", only more quickly and softer. But when I watch "The Negative ...
Etienne Kahn's user avatar
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Flapping in British English

Flapping is typical for American English (e.g. better is usually pronounced /bɛɾər/ rather than /bɛtər/), but I've also heard a few British speakers using it (EDIT: e.g. David Cameron saying better ...
Jiri Vaclavik's user avatar
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2 answers
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Should I pronounce little as ['lit(ə)l] or ['lid(ə)l]

Since English is not my first language, I watch a lot of online videos to learn the American accent. One day, I learned from Youtube that the little would be pronounced /'lid(ə)l/ by a native American ...
Issac's user avatar
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Pronunciation of Mid-Word American English T + D

I'm a native speaker of American English but have a very muddy sounding voice that I'm trying to improve. In my pronunciation the mid-word t/d sound, as in buddy, sweater, or under, is particularly ...
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In some parts of America, do people commonly use a flap after /n/, e.g. /ˈwɪn.t̬ɚ/?

I noticed that, in some American dialect (maybe in the South of America), people may use "flap T" after "n". For example, "/ˈwɪn.t̬ɚ/" source Other example, "ninety" /ˈnaɪn.t̬i/Source So, my ...
Tom's user avatar
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Why is 'sort of' pronounced /sɔːrdəv/ in AmE though /t/ is not between vowels?

Sort /sɔːrt/ of /əv/ Why is "sort of" pronounced /sɔːrdəv/ in American English even though /t/ is not between the two vowels /r/ & /ə/?
Tom's user avatar
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T- and D-flapping when at start of word preceded by vowel

It seems to me that the "d" is flapped in "I don't know" in American English. Am I right? If I am, I'm wondering if t/d is always flapped at the begining of the word when it is preceded by a vowel? ...
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So, we don't change /t/ to /d/ if /t/ is between 2 vowel sounds and /t/ is the beginning of the stressed sound in a word in American English, right? [duplicate]

Ok, see this word entertainment has IPA of /en.təˈteɪn.mənt/. Ok, now in American English if /t/ is between 2 vowel sounds then it will become /d/ cos it is flap T. But /t/ will become flap T only ...
Tom's user avatar
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a flap in "wedding" and "bidding"

I'm wondering if a flap occurs in wedding, and bidding in American pronunciation? I can't hear it out here: http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/wedding
Tim's user avatar
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Can "meet her" be pronounced [miːdər] in American English? [duplicate]

I heard people say meet her as [miːdər] in an American movie. Is it ok to pronounce it like that, or am I mishearing?
Tom's user avatar
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So called "tap", or "nap"

I'm interested in so called "tap" in american English. I've read a tap occurs in a word "twenty". I've heard this word in the internet and I've noticed a t is not pronounced or is pronounced simply as ...
Piotr's user avatar
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Must the tongue contact the alveolar ridge anteriorly in order to pronounce /t/ properly?

Some textbooks teach that when making the t sound, the front and sides of the tongue contact the alveolar ridge anteriorly and laterally. However, I feel very uncomfortable if I do that when ...
Tom's user avatar
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Why are 'student' and 'suspend' not pronounced as written?

I am a Chinese student beginning to learn English. I am curious to know why the word student is pronounced with the sound of d instead of t. Likewise, why is the sound of b used instead of p when ...
Joey zhu's user avatar
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3 answers
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Correct pronunciation of "TT"? [closed]

A single t between vowels sounds like a d to me (or like an r in my language, Brazilian Portuguese). May I say the tt spelling the same way, or does that only work for a single t?
Rafael's user avatar
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"Gotta" pronunciation

Recently, I realized that pronunciations of the reduction gotta in GB and US English are different. Could you suggest to me, please, any tutorial explaining pronunciation of this and other such ...
freude's user avatar
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15 votes
3 answers
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"nt" pronounced as "n" in American English (as in "Internet"): what is it called?

I know that pronouncing "t" as "d" is called a flap t, but is there a name for pronouncing "nt" as "n" in some words, as is common in American English? Examples: "Internet" is pronounced as "inner ...
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Are "traitor" and "trader" pronounced the same?

Are "traitor" and "trader" distinguishable when spoken with any English accent? My English-speaking friends seem to pronounce them exactly the same way.
Fixee's user avatar
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8 answers
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Is there a difference between "bitter" and "better" in pronunciation?

I was wondering if there was any difference between "bitter" and "better" in pronunciation? My assumption is that one is pronounced with a soft "d" as in "better" and the other one with a hard "t" as ...
Noah's user avatar
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Why is "t" sometimes pronounced like "d" in American English?

Why, in American English, is the word Italy is pronounced /ˈɪdəli/ and not /ˈɪtəli/? What is the rule that is followed in the pronunciation of Italy to make the letter t pronounced like a d? Why is ...
apaderno's user avatar
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