Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [flapping]

Intervocalic flapping, tapping, or t-voicing, in which the consonant /t/ is pronounced as a flap consonant (often perceived as /d/), a phenomenon especially common in North American English.

1
vote
2answers
60 views

Is this flapping?

https://youglish.com/getcid/19629243/Wouldn't/us I realized that I make a flapping sound [ɾ] when I pronounce "wouldn't". But I also realized that not every native speaker does that. Then I found ...
1
vote
0answers
56 views

Does 'd' actually flap?

Flapping or tapping, also known as alveolar flapping, intervocalic flapping, or t-voicing, is a phonological process found in many dialects of English, especially North American English, Australian ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Is it okay to pronounce “wouldn't”, “couldn't”, “didn't” like this? [duplicate]

I just realized how I pronounce those "n't" words. It's like 'd' sound in 'wedding', which is similar to 'r'. (Is it called flapping?) So how should I pronounce "wouldn't" "Wu-n" or "wu-rn"? (I ...
0
votes
2answers
148 views

Is it okay to flap “didn't” (and “wouldn't”, “couldn't”, “ridden”)

I've tried to research this topic a lot and since I'm not a native English speaker, I can't tell whether it sounds "right" or not when you flap these words. I've found some examples on youtube of ...
3
votes
1answer
152 views

The pronunciation shift of T to D in the United States

I'm from the United States and I have recently discovered that I don't pronounce the T as a soft D as other Americans do. Neither do most of the people in my area or my parents. I pronounce the word "...
4
votes
5answers
704 views

Why isn't the T in “relative” flapped?

One very common phenomenon in north-American English is T flapping when the T comes between two vowels (or semi-vowels, like the R sound) on an unstressed syllable. This "rule" is almost ...
3
votes
1answer
440 views

metal, meddle, mettle, medal pronounciation in American English

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English has the following phonetic symbols: meddle / ˈmedl; ˋmɛdl/ medal / ˈmedl; ˋmɛdl/ mettle / ˈmetl; ˋmɛtl/ metal / ˈmetl; ˋmɛtl/ ...
2
votes
2answers
208 views

strange pronunciation of /t/ before the word “the”

This has been bothering me for a long time. I know there is “stop t”, as we find in the word: wait But I’m still not sure about the /t/ before the word the in these phrases: lift the cat trust the ...
4
votes
1answer
200 views

Am I wrong when I think that I can hear the two different ways they pronounce “flap T”?

When I listen to the Beatles' "LET IT BE", I can distinctly hear that the first T is pronounced like Polish or Russian or Spanish "R", only more quickly and softer. But when I watch "The Negative ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Flapping in British English

Flapping is typical for American English (e.g. better is usually pronounced /bɛɾər/ rather than /bɛtər/), but I've also heard a few British speakers using it (EDIT: e.g. David Cameron saying better ...
1
vote
3answers
285 views

Pronunciation of Mid-Word American English T + D

I'm a native speaker of American English but have a very muddy sounding voice that I'm trying to improve. In my pronunciation the mid-word t/d sound, as in buddy, sweater, or under, is particularly ...
2
votes
2answers
176 views

In some parts of America, do people commonly use a flap after /n/, e.g. /ˈwɪn.t̬ɚ/?

I noticed that, in some American dialect (maybe in the South of America), people may use "flap T" after "n". For example, "/ˈwɪn.t̬ɚ/" source Other example, "ninety" /ˈnaɪn.t̬i/Source So, my ...
1
vote
2answers
115 views

Why is 'sort of' pronounced /sɔːrdəv/ in AmE though /t/ is not between vowels?

Sort /sɔːrt/ of /əv/ Why is "sort of" pronounced /sɔːrdəv/ in American English even though /t/ is not between the two vowels /r/ & /ə/?
3
votes
1answer
463 views

T- and D-flapping when at start of word preceded by vowel

It seems to me that the "d" is flapped in "I don't know" in American English. Am I right? If I am, I'm wondering if t/d is always flapped at the begining of the word when it is preceded by a vowel? ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

So, we don't change /t/ to /d/ if /t/ is between 2 vowel sounds and /t/ is the beginning of the stressed sound in a word in American English, right? [duplicate]

Ok, see this word entertainment has IPA of /en.təˈteɪn.mənt/. Ok, now in American English if /t/ is between 2 vowel sounds then it will become /d/ cos it is flap T. But /t/ will become flap T only ...
2
votes
1answer
231 views

a flap in “wedding” and “bidding”

I'm wondering if a flap occurs in wedding, and bidding in American pronunciation? I can't hear it out here: http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/wedding
0
votes
0answers
56 views

Can “meet her” be pronounced [miːdər] in American English? [duplicate]

I heard people say meet her as [miːdər] in an American movie. Is it ok to pronounce it like that, or am I mishearing?
0
votes
1answer
192 views

So called “tap”, or “nap”

I'm interested in so called "tap" in american English. I've read a tap occurs in a word "twenty". I've heard this word in the internet and I've noticed a t is not pronounced or is pronounced simply as ...
0
votes
2answers
959 views

Must the tongue contact the alveolar ridge anteriorly in order to pronounce /t/ properly?

Some textbooks teach that when making the t sound, the front and sides of the tongue contact the alveolar ridge anteriorly and laterally. However, I feel very uncomfortable if I do that when ...
21
votes
4answers
9k views

Why are 'student' and 'suspend' not pronounced as written?

I am a Chinese student beginning to learn English. I am curious to know why the word student is pronounced with the sound of d instead of t. Likewise, why is the sound of b used instead of p when ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

Correct pronunciation of “TT”? [closed]

A single t between vowels sounds like a d to me (or like an r in my language, Brazilian Portuguese). May I say the tt spelling the same way, or does that only work for a single t?
1
vote
2answers
335 views

“Gotta” pronunciation

Recently, I realized that pronunciations of the reduction gotta in GB and US English are different. Could you suggest to me, please, any tutorial explaining pronunciation of this and other such ...
14
votes
3answers
9k views

“nt” pronounced as “n” in American English (as in “Internet”): what is it called?

I know that pronouncing "t" as "d" is called a flap t, but is there a name for pronouncing "nt" as "n" in some words, as is common in American English? Examples: "Internet" is pronounced as "inner ...
21
votes
7answers
4k views

Are “traitor” and “trader” pronounced the same?

Are "traitor" and "trader" distinguishable when spoken with any English accent? My English-speaking friends seem to pronounce them exactly the same way.
2
votes
8answers
3k views

Is there a difference between “bitter” and “better” in pronunciation?

I was wondering if there was any difference between "bitter" and "better" in pronunciation? My assumption is that one is pronounced with a soft "d" as in "better" and the other one with a hard "t" as ...
18
votes
5answers
30k views

Why is “t” sometimes pronounced like “d” in American English?

Why, in American English, is the word Italy is pronounced /ˈɪdəli/ and not /ˈɪtəli/? What is the rule that is followed in the pronunciation of Italy to make the letter t pronounced like a d? Why is ...