Questions tagged [fast-speech-rules]

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How to pronounce "TH" quickly?

I know that how we should pronounce "TH" but sometimes when natives speaking fast, I think "TH" second sound pronounced like "d" than "ð". I'll be glad if you ...
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When does "t-y" become a "ch" and "d-y" does a "dj"? [duplicate]

'That you' becomes 'Thach you' 'Did you' becomes 'Dij you' (or something near this) But body, responsibility doesn't. When that happens?
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1 vote
0 answers
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How many allophones possible of phoneme /ə/ are there in American English?

I am an ESL student. I want to speak American English fluently. Due to influence of my local dialect in my country, I only discover that there is [ə ɐ ɪə ɑ] doubtably according to my ear, and native ...
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5 votes
1 answer
181 views

Pronunciation of "I" vowel name in fast speech

I'm not a native english speaker. I was wondering what is the right way to pronunce the "I" (/aɪ/) vowel name in fast speech. Perhaps i'm confused, but sometimes i hear /a/. Like in the ...
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12 votes
5 answers
4k views

Do "cook the" and "cooked the" get pronounced differently?

How are they different in pronunciation? In other words, how can one recognise the difference purely by sound?
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3 votes
2 answers
507 views

Is “not’ve” a valid [𝒔𝒊𝒄] contraction in either of spoken English or written English – or both or neither?

My English teacher has recently explained to me that not’ve is an accepted way to write the two spoken words not have, and he gave me this example of using it: Why that machine is not working? Oh, ...
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1 vote
3 answers
130 views

does sound th as d makes any difference in fast speech?

I know the 2 kinds of th sound, the question is does pronouncing, for instance, "that" as "dat" makes any difference to real th sound? I know pronouncing it in slow speech or out ...
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1 vote
2 answers
417 views

What is the trend in pronouncing the word "strength"? [closed]

Over the years, I have heard 3 different ways to pronounce the word strength: stre(ng)kth /stɹɛŋkθ/ strenth /st̠͡ɹ̠ɛn̪θ/ shtrength /ʃtɹɛŋθ/ I definitely pronounce it with option 3 (shtrength /ʃtɹɛŋθ/...
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  • 148
-2 votes
1 answer
98 views

Silent /t/ usage on short words? [duplicate]

The censorship on Stackoverflow will kill the platform and it's elitist snakes will be haunted. Consider following words, Its At That What I often hear them as, I/?/s Aa Tha/?/ Wha/?/ I'm ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
85 views

Is “an historical” correct? [duplicate]

Why do some people say or write an historical but not an ham sandwich or an hint?
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-3 votes
3 answers
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Why is chocolate pronounced as CHOK-LATE and not CHO-KO-LATE? [closed]

So there are many words in which one syllable gets reduced. For example, chocolate could be pronounced as CHO-KO-LATE but instead it's pronounced as CHOK-LATE, it's now 2 syllable word. Another ...
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1 answer
80 views

Is there a reduction when you say "is there "or "is this"?

I feel like native english speakers drop the voiced th sound in fast speech when they say "is there.... ?" and "is this...?". Can you tell me if I'm right or wrong . Thanks for your attention. I’m ...
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1 answer
66 views

Will you grab - we'you grab [closed]

I was watching a film with subtitles, and the phrase: "Will you grab her blanket?" sounded like "We'you graber blanket". I'm Ok with "graber", but can we drop "l"-sound in "will you"?
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1 vote
0 answers
112 views

Is there normally a lexicalized loss of phonemic /d/ in the coda of "depends"?

According to a blog article by Steven Norman under the title “My 100 most mispronounced words in English”, the word depends should be /dɪˈpenz/ when “correctly” pronounced. Notice he provides for no ...
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1 vote
1 answer
71 views

How often does assimilation take place?

I have a doubt question. Whenever native speakers speak, do they always assimilate? For example, for She has used you, might we hear any of these? ʃihæʒuːzdju ʃihæʒuːʒu ʃihæʒuːʤu ʃihæzjuːzdju ...
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8 votes
3 answers
2k views

You becoming 'CHU' and 'JU'

I know for over a fact that the word "YOU" when the word before its a T or a 'D' sound it can change to a CH sound or a J sound, but I've ALWAYS wonder why does that happen? So, I want you= aɪ wɑnt ...
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20 votes
2 answers
2k views

"Extra W" sound in words

I've wonder that in some sentences, or words, even though phonetically you don't have a 'W' sound, you can still hear some type of extra w' sound. So for example. The phrase: "Do it". /du ɪt/ will ...
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3 votes
1 answer
979 views

Pronouncing the final "‑ing" inflection as [əŋ] instead of as [ɪŋ]

I’m asking about American English, but feel free to answer about other dialects. The ‑ing verbal inflection ending is, in the abstract, a phonemic /ɪŋ/. Those phonemes usually get realized ...
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1 vote
2 answers
2k views

About odd pronunciations of "Saturday"

Have you ever heard someone pronounce Saturday as "Sara-day" or maybe "Sair-day"? I’ve an in-law who does this. His parents were New Englanders, but by the time he was born, they lived in New Jersey ...
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1 vote
2 answers
2k views

Pronunciation of "of" in connected speech: Can /v/ ever be pronounced as /f/ in some cases?

I know that the /v/ sound at the of the word have is sometimes pronounced as /f/ in the phrase have to, which becomes /ˈhæftə/. Is there a similar thing where the /v/ sound at end of the word of ...
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  • 307
2 votes
2 answers
306 views

strange pronunciation of /t/ before the word "the"

This has been bothering me for a long time. I know there is “stop t”, as we find in the word: wait But I’m still not sure about the /t/ before the word the in these phrases: lift the cat trust the ...
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  • 89
5 votes
1 answer
371 views

Blending Two Individual Words Together That Share the Same Consonant Cluster

I've noticed that this phenomenon is common in fast speech. I have searched and searched on the internet for the official name for this, but I cannot seem to find it. Here are some examples: With ...
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9 votes
4 answers
416 views

Is there a term for when the "d'" is dropped in a "not" contraction?

Actors Josh Radnor and Michael Weston pronounce shouldn't like "shunt" or wouldn't like "wunt". Is there a proper linguistic term for this pattern of pronunciation?
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1 vote
2 answers
178 views

Can the /t/ and /v/ sounds be dropped in "what," "that" and "of"? [closed]

Is it ok to drop the 't' sound in these example: wha that (what that) tha the (that the) & the 'v' (like in the the word 'of') sound matter o fact (mater of fact) of course, to a native ...
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3 votes
2 answers
22k views

Past tense: "happen to have" or "happened to have"?

Which is the proper (i.e. grammatically correct) response?   Alice: "The earth is flat, and the sky is green."     Bob: "The earth is round, and the sky is blue." Alice: "...
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  • 462
0 votes
2 answers
2k views

Does a word that starts with a vowel letter start with a vowel sound?

I'm currently learning about consonant to vowel linking, and I'm wondering if it's safe to assume that most words (if not all?) that start with a vowel letter (a, e, i, o, u) will also start with a ...
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1 vote
0 answers
1k views

TV presenters unable to pronounce "x" [duplicate]

I'm bemused by the inability of TV presenters to pronounce the letter "x" as in "six", introducing a "k" in its place (so six is pronounced as "sick", sixth as "sickth"). The same also tend to omit ...
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6 votes
4 answers
2k views

Do you take a break between words, when pronouncing?

This question is all on the title. English is written in the way that each word is separate. Then how about pronunciation? Does a break appear, separating words while you pronounce? Or is it not ...
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  • 421
1 vote
1 answer
464 views

listening and pronunciation of contractions, 'd

I can't exactly hear the sound of 'd in cassettes, like: She'd make it. She'd be with them very soon. I tried to listen them in youtube. I found I could hear it when some native english ...
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3 votes
3 answers
1k views

the weak form of 'on'

I am confused at whether or not there is a weak form at preposition's 'ON'. I've checked at some dictionaries at Cambridge and Oxford dictionary, they don't mention on the weak form's pronunciation. ...
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0 votes
0 answers
120 views

Why does "Baby Daddy" TV series have a very difficult accent?

I can hardly understand Baby Daddy TV series season 2, so I downloaded the script. Now, I can recognize words and sentences because I read along as I listen. But I still find it a very fast accent. I ...
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4 votes
3 answers
2k views

Not fully pronounced oʊ (ō) sound in some words

Words like so, no, vocabulary, and don’t all contain the long o sound inside them. But I regularly hear native English speakers pronouncing the [oʊ] sound in these words (and some others containing ...
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  • 469
1 vote
2 answers
891 views

Fast speech and palatalization T+D

when the phrase "I understand you" is pronounced, does the palatalization happen in fast/connected speech? In other words, does the D+Y sounds more like a J sound as in Joke). Here's the way I ...
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2 votes
1 answer
2k views

The elision of alveolar plosives

when the phrase "Can't complain" is pronounced [ˈkænt kəmˈpleɪn] I think that the T is dropped in fast speech because of the alveolar plosives. Right? I read that when T comes before these letters: / ...
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3 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is it true that only unstressed words in a sentence, which have H at the beginning of the words, will be dropped in American English?

Is it true that only unstressed words in a sentence, which have H at the beginning of the words, will be dropped in American English? Off course, these H words will not be the beginning of the ...
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  • 4,471
0 votes
1 answer
2k views

Pronunciation of "with"

For me it's quite hard to pronounce with correctly, especially when I try to speak faster. For example, saying with sauce nearly breaks my tongue. Do you have any advice for me? Can I reduce the with ...
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