Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [fast-speech-rules]

The tag has no usage guidance.

-1
votes
0answers
40 views

How does one pronounce “Miles's”? [closed]

I know: this might be a duplicate. I've read the others. I'm still confused. Some people say "M-eye-lz" and others "M-eye-lzes." Are both pronunciations acceptable? Or is one colloquial while the ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

How often does assimilation take place?

I have a doubt question. Whenever native speakers speak, do they always assimilate? For example, for She has used you, might we hear any of these? ʃihæʒuːzdju ʃihæʒuːʒu ʃihæʒuːʤu ʃihæzjuːzdju ...
8
votes
3answers
681 views

You becoming 'CHU' and 'JU'

I know for over a fact that the word "YOU" when the word before its a T or a 'D' sound it can change to a CH sound or a J sound, but I've ALWAYS wonder why does that happen? So, I want you= aɪ wɑnt ...
20
votes
2answers
2k views

“Extra W” sound in words

I've wonder that in some sentences, or words, even though phonetically you don't have a 'W' sound, you can still hear some type of extra w' sound. So for example. The phrase: "Do it". /du ɪt/ will ...
2
votes
1answer
306 views

Pronouncing the final “‑ing” inflection as [əŋ] instead of as [ɪŋ]

I’m asking about American English, but feel free to answer about other dialects. The ‑ing verbal inflection ending is, in the abstract, a phonemic /ɪŋ/. Those phonemes usually get realized ...
1
vote
1answer
438 views

About odd pronunciations of “Saturday”

Have you ever heard someone pronounce Saturday as "Sara-day" or maybe "Sair-day"? I’ve an in-law who does this. His parents were New Englanders, but by the time he was born, they lived in New Jersey ...
1
vote
2answers
527 views

Pronunciation of “of” in connected speech: Can /v/ ever be pronounced as /f/ in some cases?

I know that the /v/ sound at the of the word have is sometimes pronounced as /f/ in the phrase have to, which becomes /ˈhæftə/. Is there a similar thing where the /v/ sound at end of the word of ...
1
vote
0answers
661 views

Is when're a proper contraction of “when are”? [closed]

I've seen that no contractions are used in formal writing. I believe "when're" tries to represent spoken casual English when it would sound like "when-er". Is "when're" ok in an informal text? For ...
2
votes
2answers
206 views

strange pronunciation of /t/ before the word “the”

This has been bothering me for a long time. I know there is “stop t”, as we find in the word: wait But I’m still not sure about the /t/ before the word the in these phrases: lift the cat trust the ...
5
votes
1answer
192 views

Blending Two Individual Words Together That Share the Same Consonant Cluster

I've noticed that this phenomenon is common in fast speech. I have searched and searched on the internet for the official name for this, but I cannot seem to find it. Here are some examples: With ...
9
votes
3answers
296 views

Is there a term for when the “d'” is dropped in a “not” contraction?

Actors Josh Radnor and Michael Weston pronounce shouldn't like "shunt" or wouldn't like "wunt". Is there a proper linguistic term for this pattern of pronunciation?
1
vote
2answers
104 views

Can the /t/ and /v/ sounds be dropped in “what,” “that” and “of”? [closed]

Is it ok to drop the 't' sound in these example: wha that (what that) tha the (that the) & the 'v' (like in the the word 'of') sound matter o fact (mater of fact) of course, to a native ...
2
votes
2answers
7k views

Past tense: “happen to have” or “happened to have”?

Alice: "The earth is flat, and the sky is green."     Bob: "The earth is round, and the sky is blue." Alice: "Can you provide indisputable proof of these claims?"   &...
0
votes
2answers
961 views

Does a word that starts with a vowel letter start with a vowel sound?

I'm currently learning about consonant to vowel linking, and I'm wondering if it's safe to assume that most words (if not all?) that start with a vowel letter (a, e, i, o, u) will also start with a ...
1
vote
0answers
450 views

TV presenters unable to pronounce “x” [duplicate]

I'm bemused by the inability of TV presenters to pronounce the letter "x" as in "six", introducing a "k" in its place (so six is pronounced as "sick", sixth as "sickth"). The same also tend to omit ...
6
votes
4answers
1k views

Do you take a break between words, when pronouncing?

This question is all on the title. English is written in the way that each word is separate. Then how about pronunciation? Does a break appear, separating words while you pronounce? Or is it not ...
1
vote
1answer
329 views

listening and pronunciation of contractions, 'd

I can't exactly hear the sound of 'd in cassettes, like: She'd make it. She'd be with them very soon. I tried to listen them in youtube. I found I could hear it when some native english ...
3
votes
3answers
701 views

the weak form of 'on'

I am confused at whether or not there is a weak form at preposition's 'ON'. I've checked at some dictionaries at Cambridge and Oxford dictionary, they don't mention on the weak form's pronunciation. ...
1
vote
0answers
106 views

Why does “Baby Daddy” TV series have a very difficult accent?

I can hardly understand Baby Daddy TV series season 2, so I downloaded the script. Now, I can recognize words and sentences because I read along as I listen. But I still find it a very fast accent. I ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Not fully pronounced oʊ (ō) sound in some words

Words like so, no, vocabulary, and don’t all contain the long o sound inside them. But I regularly hear native English speakers pronouncing the [oʊ] sound in these words (and some others containing ...
1
vote
2answers
616 views

Fast speech and palatalization T+D

when the phrase "I understand you" is pronounced, does the palatalization happen in fast/connected speech? In other words, does the D+Y sounds more like a J sound as in Joke). Here's the way I ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

The elision of alveolar plosives

when the phrase "Can't complain" is pronounced [ˈkænt kəmˈpleɪn] I think that the T is dropped in fast speech because of the alveolar plosives. Right? I read that when T comes before these letters: / ...
3
votes
2answers
783 views

Is it true that only unstressed words in a sentence, which have H at the beginning of the words, will be dropped in American English?

Is it true that only unstressed words in a sentence, which have H at the beginning of the words, will be dropped in American English? Off course, these H words will not be the beginning of the ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Pronunciation of “with”

For me it's quite hard to pronounce with correctly, especially when I try to speak faster. For example, saying with sauce nearly breaks my tongue. Do you have any advice for me? Can I reduce the with ...