Questions tagged [existential-constructions]

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There seems (to be) a... vs. There seems (to be) little

There seems to be a problem. There seems a problem. In this type of construction, the version with to be, such as (1), is much more productive than the one without, such as (2). See this Ngram: ...
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What-questions of existential sentences

I'm interested in whether what in (1) is interpreted uniformly. Presumably, what in (1a) refers to kinds rather than individuals: it's related to there's such (kinds of) things in Boston--not to e.g. ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Are these sentences existential?

I am studying existential there, but I am not sure if the following sentences are exemple of existential sentences. All sentences come from Oscar Wilde's A house of pomegranates, available at Project ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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Correct usage of neither/nor vs. not/and + usage of was/were

Since I am not a native speaker, I would like to consult with you. Which version would be the correct one? (I am translating a text in informal style) There were neither hair dryer, shower gel, nor ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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The subject-verb agreement with existential 'there' in a relative clause

So I was reading the urban dictionary for the definition of the term 'LibLabCon', and the entry seemed grammatically correct: LibLabCon is a phrase used by Britons who hold the belief that there is ...
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If his son is dead: "His son was John Smith", "His son is John Smith"

If someone's son has died, would you say: "His son was John Smith" or "His son is John Smith"? Dying stops you from being, but would that stop someone from being someone's son?
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1 vote
1 answer
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Is the usage of “does no longer exist” grammatically correct? [closed]

Example: This Facebook member does no longer exist. Is it grammatically correct to add “does” in front of no longer exist or is it only correct to say that “it no longer exists” or “it does no longer ...
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1 answer
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Can locative "there" be omitted when the location is explicit? [duplicate]

Is In the park is a tree. grammatical as In the park there is a tree. ? Moreover, how about inaccusative verbs like: In the park sits a dog. ? Thanks for any help.
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8 votes
1 answer
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there + semantic verb

What semantic verbs are used with there besides the verb to be? I'm looking for the cases when there is used as a formal subject. For example in: There came a knock There comes a point in life
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2 votes
1 answer
3k views

"There is any number of" vs "There are any number of" [duplicate]

There is any number of ... There are any number of ... Intuitively I'd say 'are', but 'number' is singular, right? Please note that this question is different from these two questions here: A ...
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7 votes
3 answers
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Can 'nothing' ever be preceded by a plural verb?

I've had it drilled into my head that nothing is always singular, since it's essentially another way to say 'no thing'. However, in the following sentence, I'm having trouble ascertaining whether the ...
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