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Questions tagged [exclamations]

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Comma after em-dash

I have seen many questions on this, but all the answers seem to address the example—how the use of em-dash may be avoided using some other forms of punctuation in that particular example—and not the ...
Utkan Gezer's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
57 views

Inversion — a really odd example

In the book Story Genius by Lisa Cron we read: Even if she's only six, she already has a worldview that, like most of us, she's never even questioned—why should she? As far as she can see it's "...
Lux's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
105 views

Exclamation as a negative adverbal phrase for an inverted sentence?

I am wondering if it is possible to construct an emotional sentence with an exclamation followed by an inversion: Holy cow is this fish small! [added:] How did it not sink your boat? with the ...
Kiki's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
1 answer
79 views

Do any exclamative sentences admit Subject-Auxiliary Inversion?

I just read in a comic book How great is it that your partner knows so many good restaurants! Is this substandard English? Or are there some types of clauses (e.g. It-clefts) that have exclamative ...
Zoltan's user avatar
  • 493
1 vote
3 answers
245 views

An exclamation for “this is what I was looking for”?

I am looking for an exclamation for a situation like the following: You are disappointed for what there is or you already have, and then you unexpectedly find/discover something that is so different ...
Sasan's user avatar
  • 3,462
-1 votes
1 answer
80 views

What is the meaning of 'how' in "How unique?"? [closed]

I was wondering about the semantic meaning of 'how' in this phrase. How unique? Could it be taken out and left as just "Unique?" Or does it actually give meaning to the phrase?
ConlangersUnite's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
54 views

What’s the most practical punctuation for this simple sentence? [closed]

I know this seems rudimentary, but it’s tripping me up for some reason. Yuck. Mushrooms are gross. I feel the period creates to much of a pause and strays too far away from the emphasis I want on ...
Max's user avatar
  • 9
2 votes
1 answer
344 views

What's an early modern English excalmation roughly meaning "raise the roof!"?

I am a translator of Russian historical fiction set in the early modern period (mid-late 16th century) and I am looking for some good period-specific English equivalents of the phrase "жги-говори!...
Maya's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes
3 answers
169 views

What does the word "kzaar" mean?

On a YouTube video I have heard a speaker of American English accent in a gaming context saying the exclamation: Kzaaar! Does someone know what that means and how to spell it correctly? This is the ...
Francesco's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
72 views

Is it wrong to say "Welcome" to a supervisor? [closed]

Today one of my supervisors incorporated stealthy and late into the shift and I saluted her with "Welcome!". My coworker implied that because she is the supervisor I should salute her with ...
Rosenthal's user avatar
  • 109
1 vote
0 answers
28 views

Is the expression "Come what may" an exclamative? [duplicate]

A bit of a split-hair question, but should the word "come" in "come what may" be understood as an imperative, and therefore "come what may" is an exclamative (as in "...
Dxml's user avatar
  • 161
2 votes
4 answers
1k views

Does the sentence 'Boy, are my arms tired' mean 'Boy, my arms are tired.'? [closed]

I found a meme that says 'I flew in from (wherever) and boy are my arms tired!'. I can understand what's funny about this meme but I can't understand why 'are my arms tired!' is used instead of 'my ...
notnative's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
240 views

Exclamations with "what a(n) ...!"

Do we always mean something positive in such exclamations? For example: What a boy! What a book! Can they be interpreted in a negative way depending on something like intonation or whatever? I mean,...
Ren's user avatar
  • 136
2 votes
2 answers
479 views

What are the parts of speech in this exclamatory sentence?

I am attempting to help a student with a particular sentence: What an amazingly wise creature God made in the otter! The exercise asks him to identify if the sentence is active or passive. That ...
Jason Derksen's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
129 views

Use of word “HOW” for exclamation or praise

Can I use the word “how” for praise in this way: How they move! I want to say that how beautifully they move. Is this a correct sentence?
Muhammad Yamman's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
291 views

Any less impolite alternatives for the too-informal interjection “Hell”?

Consider the passage: Mathematicians are pretty comfortable with treating spaces without any embedding. A surface can just exist—no need for a volume for it to hover in. It does so with all its ...
lineage's user avatar
  • 129
2 votes
1 answer
266 views

What is the proper name for idiomatic, exclamative phrases? [duplicate]

I'm wondering what the proper term would be for exclamations like "Hell's bells!", "Billions of blue blistering barnacles!", and "By Lucifer's Beard!". Specifically, I'm wondering about phrases, ...
Theo Bendit's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
171 views

Do religious people avoid all exclamations that start with "holy"? [closed]

When I googled exclamations beginning with "Holy", I found that there is a character on an educational show for kids who said "holy cow" when he saw an elephant Does that mean that exclamations that ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 31
1 vote
0 answers
123 views

the exclamative 'what'

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 919): 8.1.2 Exclamative what What occurs in NPs with a following noun head: there is no exclamative counterpart to the interrogative what of What ...
JK2's user avatar
  • 6,633
1 vote
0 answers
242 views

Is it ok to use just "Careful!" instead of ”Be careful!” preceded by “be”?

Is it “correct” if I say Careful! here without be in front of it? Careful! There is a car coming! Careful! Just one step back and you will fall off the cliff.
Hidetoshi Hoang's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
1k views

Why is inversion used in "And boy, have we patented it!"?

In 2007, Steve Jobs announced the first iPhone. During the presentation, he introduced a feature called Multi-touch; he said, "And boy, have we patented it!" What I am wondering about is the ...
Tzetachi's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
4k views

Can I Start a Sentence with the Words 'Awesome' and 'Great' when Responding to Someone?

I was wondering if it's grammatically correct to start a sentence with the words 'awesome' and 'great' as a response. For example: Person 1: "The meeting has been scheduled." Person 2: "Great, ...
Bob the Builder's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
583 views

How common in AmE are exclamatory sentences like "What a great day it is!"?

My wife, who is a native speaker of AmE, tells me that I am talking like Yoda whenever I utter a sentence like What a great day it is! that is, an exclamatory sentence that begins with "how" or "...
Pteromys's user avatar
  • 375
2 votes
0 answers
90 views

Why is "wassup" pronounced /ˈwɒsʌp/ but /ˈwɒzʌp/?

Oxford https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/wassup Collins https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/wassup "Wassup" stands for "What is up?" and "is" is pronounced "iz" so I ...
emeraldhieu's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
160 views

Is "That is so cheap!?" an exclamative?

Is the line That is so cheap! an exclamative? I've researched exclamatives and found that these usually begin with "what" or "how". However, I know it's definitely not a declarative sentence ...
A. Bell 's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
7k views

What's the Scottish equivalent of "holy crap!" "oh my God!" "Jesus Christ!", etc?

No swear words, please (sorry). It's for a YA fantasy that takes place on Skye (modern day), and has to be something a teenager might say (again, yeah, I know. Swearing. But surely there's ...
BodieOConnor's user avatar
-2 votes
2 answers
91 views

An exclamation for showing resentment when departing?

There are a couple of different exclamations for when you depart from someone, such as bye, bye-bye, good-bye, see you, etc. Is there any departing exclamation for when you want to show that you are ...
Sasan's user avatar
  • 3,462
-1 votes
1 answer
9k views

What does Ok! indicate [closed]

Some one had a query and gave him the answer in chat. He replied 'Ok!'. What does ! after 'Ok' mean? Does it indicate sarcasm?
FastTurtle's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
6k views

Is "shh" a word and why? [closed]

Is shh a word? If it is, why is it a word? If it is not, why isn't it a word?
Brett Reinhard's user avatar
4 votes
5 answers
33k views

Onomatopoeia for disgust [duplicate]

Are there any English onomatopoeias for disgust / loathe? What exclamations are commonly used to express repulsion? Something that could be used like: (___) dog shit. I loathe it! (some sound here)...
jaboja's user avatar
  • 159
6 votes
3 answers
1k views

How ‘HOW’ change the meaning of the Twinkle song?

I'm a Spanish speaker so this makes me confused. In the song, Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star I would understand I wonder what you are! ==> Me pregunto que eres (seras)! But they add HOW before. ...
Juan Carlos Oropeza's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
537 views

Expletive or exclamation meaning "exactly" or "precisely" [closed]

I have a friend who is an excellent non-native English speaker. However, when agreeing emphatically via text message, he will sometimes say "exact-fucking-ly!" This sounds odd compared to "abso-...
Eric's user avatar
  • 201
-1 votes
1 answer
2k views

Duah vs. Dua? Which one is right? [closed]

For the phrase, "Yeah, duah [dua]," which spelling is correct? In this case "duah," means "obviously."
Melody's user avatar
  • 9
0 votes
1 answer
187 views

See? How fun this game is!

I'm not a native speaker, and I need help with the proper usage of exclamatives in some contexts. [Context1: John is playing a video game alone, and is enjoying it. He utters:] 1. How fun this game ...
braininvat's user avatar
-1 votes
3 answers
995 views

Use of the word "farewell"

If I use "farewell to headache" as a slogan, would it imply a statement similar to "relieves headache" or "treats headache"? or is there a contradiction in meaning that headache is a bad thing and you ...
Ender Bozkurt's user avatar
14 votes
2 answers
21k views

Yikes! Where did it come from?

(humorous, slang) Expressing fear. (humorous, slang) Expressing empathy with unpleasant or undesirable circumstances. [Wiktionary] Yikes! Where did it come from? OED says "Origin unknown, but ...
ermanen's user avatar
  • 63.4k
0 votes
2 answers
6k views

How easy it is or How easy is it [duplicate]

The actual sentence goes like this: How easy it is to integrate the two applications? or How easy is it to integrate the two applications? To my understanding 'How easy it is' wrong if used as a ...
Radha Krishnan's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
2k views

The word "pew" (P.U., etc.) and positive or neutral connotation

Normally, whenever I've heard the word "pew" (or its Bugs Bunny-esque cousin P.U.), it's applied to a bad smell of some kind. I just started learning an old folk song from the Appalachians called "...
fool4jesus's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
183 views

Quotations and Exclamation Marks [duplicate]

I am writing an email reply and want to confirm if the punctuation below is correct. * In response to your question, if it is available, my answer is “yes!" * EDIT: Also, should the exclamation ...
Amanda's user avatar
  • 1
3 votes
5 answers
2k views

Polite or unrectified placement of the word please

I would please prefer to take both parts of the test on Monday. Is the placement of the word please in this sentence grammatically correct?
Roseanne Branda's user avatar
26 votes
7 answers
5k views

Eww! Has it crossed the pond yet?

I hear eww (sometimes spelt as ew) fairly regularly on American sitcoms, usually uttered by a scatterbrained beautiful blonde girl when she sees or hears something disgusting. I don't recall it ever ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 91.9k
1 vote
1 answer
13k views

Could "Hats off!" be insulting in some situations?

What are true situations and structures to use Hats off! as an exclamation? Could this idiom be insulting in some situations?
user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
37k views

Where did the phrase "Holy Toledo" come from?

I was reading online and noticed this phrase in the comments. Holy Toledo What is the origin of this phrase? It appears in Max Shulman's 1951 collection of stories, The Many Loves of Dobie ...
Erisin's user avatar
  • 109
13 votes
3 answers
13k views

Why do we use the word “oops”, if something goes wrong?

Why do we use the word oops in a sentence or when communicating with others, if something goes wrong? I would like to know the correct information regarding this question.
Maniprakash Chinnasamy's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
348 views

What is the difference between "Aha!", "Ouch!", "Phew!" and "Aah!"

I was confused what to use in gap 11. Kindly after going through the passage answer the following 4 questions and in question 3 please explain why you have chosen any option and what is the ...
Singh's user avatar
  • 107
2 votes
1 answer
7k views

Are these how's meaning 'how well'?

It’s not easy how I have to read clauses starting with how. I’m going to start this question with a case from Longman –– “He was impressed at how well she could read! (A)”. Though Longman says how is ...
Listenever's user avatar
  • 3,474
-2 votes
1 answer
5k views

Omitting commas in brief statements

In a brief exhortation followed by the name of a sports team, such as "Let's go, Dodgers!" or "Go, Phillies!" is it ever appropriate to omit the comma?
Scott Skelton's user avatar
12 votes
5 answers
3k views

"God bless you" equivalent for fart?

In response to someone sneezing there are a few possible phrases you can say as a form of polite acknowledgement: "God bless you" "Gesundheit" And others. But with a fart you ...
jmathew's user avatar
  • 369
1 vote
0 answers
115 views

Exclaiming Questions [duplicate]

What is the correct way to write a question you would verbally ask in a higher tone of voice? How is this possible?! OR How is this possible!? The subtlety lies in the punctuation. Thanks
Igbanam's user avatar
  • 139
1 vote
2 answers
4k views

Origin of “Homeward ho!”

In the English translation of an essay by Leon Trotsky that came out in Foreign Affairs, I read [emphasis added]: Now it turns out that the world exchange is the source of all misfortunes and ...
Giorgiomastrò's user avatar