Questions tagged [errors]

Questions arising from error (real or perceived): solecism, malapropism, mondegreens, eggcorns, disputed usages, so-called "corruption", folk etymologies, but also requests for interpretation when the text in question arguably contains an error, and questions which stem from a misunderstanding. Do not use when an error has not been made: for example, "which is correct" questions arise from uncertainty, not error.

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4answers
265 views

Is “… microphones don't have cameras” a Freudian slip, intentional, or [sic]? How to tell?

In response to Kellyanne Conway's observations that microwave ovens can turn into cameras: There was an article this week that talked about how you could surveil someone through their phones, ...
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1answer
852 views

motherload – a common mistake or slang word?

I am a bit unsure about how the word "motherload" should be seen – as a common mistake or slang word or both. I've encountered the word the first time in a recent Guardian article, but to my surprise ...
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3answers
754 views

Are there names for consonant-shifts when suffixes are added?

I saw a spelling mistake on an SO question: submittion. That got me wondering, is there a name for the shift of ‑mit‑ to ‑miss‑ in submission, permission, admission and so on? Are there other patterns ...
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2answers
484 views

Norman Mailer's famous sentence — where is the grammatical error?

The great American novelist Norman Mailer apparently began his rather brilliant novel 'HARLOT's GHOST' with a 'major grammatical error.' The sentence is as follows: "On a late-winter evening in ...
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2answers
31k views

Chairman, chairwoman or chairperson? [closed]

In India, a male public official elected to chair a committee is still called Chairman, while a female official is nowadays called Chairperson. The term 'chairwoman' is never used, but a male official ...
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4answers
412 views

Is it all right to use the term “infant child” in writing?

(EDITED minimally 5 hours after posting, to apply corrections in terminology suggested by members in comments -- the original question was "is 'infant child' grammatically correct?") Infant is one of ...
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3answers
1k views

Isn’t a word missing?

I’m quoting a part of the article titled “Pakistan Sees Shared Intelligence Lapse” written by Alan Cowell in today’s (May 4) New York Time’s Asia Pacific section (online edition) simply by cut-and-...
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1answer
257 views

Why do many foreigners forget to say 'it' while speaking English?

"Is often seen -- you know -- these foreign players, they forget to say "it" -- I mean, while speaking in English... is odd to hear, you know... is peculiar, is that how you say? Even I forget to say,...
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2answers
527 views

Where is the mistake in “It's essential for us to book tickets for the theatre in advance”? [closed]

Find the mistake: It's essential for us to book tickets for the theatre in advance . I see no mistake here, can anybody help me find the mistake?
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2answers
9k views

What does the phrase “yet alone” mean?

I cannot find the phrase "yet alone" in any online dictionaries. What does the phrase "yet alone" mean in the following sentences: The fact that small rural communities are often ...
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1answer
2k views

Lowercase “moon”, “sun” and “solar system”?

From a grade school textbook: Good morning, children. I'm an astronomer. I study the stars and the planets. They're amazing! We live on the Earth. The Earth is a planet. It rotates all the ...
0
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1answer
552 views

Which part of the given sentence has an error and why? [closed]

Below is the sentence, divided into four parts: (a) I will try (b) to be on time (c) but do not worry (d) when I am late.
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1answer
330 views

Which part of the given sentence has an error and why? [closed]

Below is the sentence divided into four parts, indicated as (a), (b), (c), (d): (a) Another baffling change (b)that I notice in him (c) nowadays is that he (d) avoids to speak to me.
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1answer
1k views

Germanic vs. Germaic [closed]

My son was just describing something as being germaic and I corrected him to say germanic, at which point he pulled up germaic on the internet. Is there any reason to use germaic instead of germanic?...
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1answer
1k views

Is “consumed the marriage” a typo?

I am reading a book that says a man "consumed the marriage", which I presume should be "consummated". I did find an Italian website a using the same expression, although that read like it was written ...
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0answers
61 views

Difference between “I only have 10 dollar on me and ”I have only 10 dollar on me" [duplicate]

Is there any grammatical correctness in either of these expressions: "I only have 10 dollar on and "I have only 10 dollar on me" ?
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2answers
13k views

How widely-accepted is “What do you got?” to Americans?

Watching A Stranger Among Us, I noticed that Melanie Griffith twice asked "What do you got?" I recognise this as an American construction which sounds strange to me — Brits invariably say either "...
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0answers
92 views

Into which category does the phrase “middle end” fall?

In compiler design, you can sometimes read the phrase middle end. In that context "front end" and "back end" are natural combinations, where "end" denotes the position in the chain and "back/front" ...
2
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1answer
400 views

What does “nukulate” mean?

What does nukulate mean in the following sentence from a question on Cooking SE? Nukulate for 3 minutes on high.
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1answer
2k views

Etymology of “marketing:” how/when did it change meaning? [closed]

The best etymology I could find says the definition of marketing has changed like this: 1560s, "buying and selling," verbal noun from market (v.). Meaning "produce bought at a market" is from ...
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2answers
5k views

Difference between homo sapiens and homo sapiens sapiens? [closed]

I know the Latin homo means "human being" or "man", while sapiens means "wise". So, homo sapiens means "wise man." What does our subspecies, homo sapiens sapiens, mean? Is it, "wise man who knows?"
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1answer
12k views

“Whom of which”, a valid expression? [closed]

I recently encountered this expression and I'm pretty much stumped. People seem to be using it in place of "who". Example: [...] they were developed by non-medical professionals whom of which have ...
0
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1answer
678 views

What is the correct structure to use in this comparison?

In this sentence: … Richard wrote his book very enthusiastically and elaborately, and thus it was more popular. What should replace the ellipsis? Unlike those of his colleagues Unlike ...
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5answers
656 views

Noun to describe a “typo-filled” letter

I am changing my e-mail signature on my phone to read: Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S4. Please do not mistake my brevity and/or misspellings for apathy and/or ignorance. I am looking for a better ...
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1answer
98 views

What is the error called when spaces are placed incorrectly?

He went home , but he forgot his phone .He returned to get it . ^ ^ ^ These are some examples, which nowadays get autocorrected by word ...
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1answer
89 views

What is the error called when a letter of an abbreviation is spelled out afterwards?

HIV Virus DNS System IRC Chat LCD Display RAID Array These are some examples for this and people do this quite often.
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1answer
3k views

Use of “hand in” in this sentence [closed]

I've already learned that "hand in" is a phrasal verb that means "submit". But I've also seen this sentence somewhere: "The homework is not hand in on time". I've already checked grammar by several ...
12
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5answers
672 views

What's the term for introducing an error when you edit a sentence?

Several years ago, I recall learning an English term that described the following sort of error: I write (or begin writing) a sentence without error. I decide to change something in the sentence. I ...
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2answers
373 views

Is there a typo in this sentence? If not, help me understand it [closed]

I'm having trouble parsing this sentence: (I hope I used "parsing" correctly.) Now, the history of Eliza Doolittle, though called a romance because of the transfiguration it records seems ...
2
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1answer
100 views

Is there a linguistic term the type of solecism of using “more X” when “Xer” is the established comparative?

So I posted a joke on Facebook, and one of the peanut gallery chimed in that where I'd used vaster, he would have preferred more vast. Leaving aside the question of whether vaster itself is well-...
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7answers
642 views

How to assess “an access of butchness”

I read this phrase in Alan Bennett’s Diary years ago and found it so unusual I’ve never forgotten it. Italics mine: 8 December. Trying to find someone a Meccano set for Christmas, I’m reminded of ...
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1answer
155 views

What kinds of phonetic or phonological linguistic gaffes are there? (mondegreens, eggcorns, spoonerisms) [closed]

I was wondering what other sorts of phonetics-based linguistic gaffes there are. I don't mean the typical grammatical or syntactic error. Rather, I mean things like "eggcorns": eggcorn /...
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1answer
211 views

SAT Grammar - Gerunds vs. Parallelism

Hello everyone I was working on the following question: I said the error was A, because it should be how to preserve right? But apparently that is not the error, I cannot seem to find any other ...
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3answers
814 views

“Typo” for speech?

Is there a word that describes a spoken error wherein the speaker accidentally replaces a phoneme with an incorrect one? For example, an English teaches I had in high school once uttered the response ...
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2answers
533 views

Is there room for improvement in this sentence? Complex sentence [closed]

The sentence is the following: Along the years, I've developed a keen computational thinking which in addition to my sharp aesthetic judgment made me a really valuable player for any cross-...
3
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1answer
717 views

Is there a word for misusing or adding letters to words/names?

Some people add or change letters that aren't in a word or name, i.e., "Simonese" cat instead of "Siamese" cat, and French "provinincial" furniture instead of French "provincial" furniture. Also ...
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7answers
95k views

Is “substract” (versus “subtract”) a proper word?

I read an article recently where the author used "substract" instead of "subtract". I'm more familiar with the latter word but after doing a bit of googling, it seems that both words are being used, ...
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3answers
1k views

only that … or only that's …?

I have never seen the following expression : only that’s ….. ( I understand “only that” grammatically instead of “only that’s “….. ) ‘Have you seen her yet?’ he asked. ‘Not yet.’ ‘But ...
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2answers
860 views

Is 'Mochup' the same as 'Mock-up'?

I recently came across the word 'mochup'. I am unsure if this is simply a spelling mistake of the term 'mock-up', or if it is a technical neologism with a slightly different meaning. Searching on ...
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1answer
249 views

Identifying sentence error

M.J. Hyland, who authored the acclaimed 2003 novel How the Light Gets In, is often praised to be a subtle and complex portrayer of human psychology. What is wrong with the bolded construction and ...
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2answers
202 views

Why is one construction incorrect in this sentence?

Archaeological evidence shows that Viking ships were lighter, slimmer, and faster than that of the English vs those used by the English? Why is the first underlined form incorrect while the second ...
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1answer
112 views

native-speaker's errors? [closed]

I suspect that the following opening paragraph in an email is not written by an educated native speaker of English. It has come to my attention that there has been several times whereby students ...
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2answers
299 views

help message using maybe (most probable reason) [closed]

I am developing a software where the user can save his work. But for some reasons the save task can fail. One of the most probable reason is the fact that his document is already open. I want to help ...
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1answer
539 views

Detection of dangling modifier

Sentence that needs correction : "For building vocabulary skills, students should try to speak and write new words in appropriate contexts, rather than merely memorizing definitions". How is "for ...
0
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1answer
123 views

Cannot understand sentence mistake? [closed]

Until it can be replaced by a faster, more efficient, and more economical means of transportation, trucks will Cary most of the freight within and through metropolitan areas. Why is the 'Until it' ...
0
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1answer
6k views

Book: There Are Two Errors in the the Title of This Book [closed]

There Are Two Errors in the the Title of This Book is a book by Robert Martin about philosophical puzzles. Obviously the first error in the title is the repetition of the word "the". What is the ...
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4answers
459 views

Can you say “Why Tom let Katie win”

Some one pointed to me that in this Star magazine from cover, the editor used the sentence "Why Tom let Katie win" instead of "Why did Tom let Katie win". Is it a correct form or is the grammatical ...
2
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6answers
887 views

Misinterpretation / Misrepresentation of statistics?

I'm looking for a single word or and expression for a faulty use of statistics. It can involve poor interpretation or representation of statistics or the false assumptions or logic that cause those ...
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1answer
10k views

How many types of errors are there in English language? [closed]

I was lately reviewing a book and had to tell about the errors. It was on C++, so I had to differentiate between the kinds of errors so that people don't get terrified like "OMG 50 errors? Bad book." ...
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1answer
4k views

Where can I find examples of really bad writing? [closed]

Do you know where I can find examples of really bad writing? I'm looking for garbled sentence structure, errors in spelling, grammar, and vocabulary, redundancy, tautology, internal contradictions, ...