Questions tagged [ellipsis]

An ellipsis is an omission of words from a clause, or the punctuation mark "..."

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0answers
2k views

Can “more” be used without “than”? [migrated]

As I'm getting familiar with English grammar, I'm facing a few doubts. The word more is a comparative form of much (for non-countable nouns) and many (with countable nouns). However, I can use more ...
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1answer
36 views

Indefinite article + superlative adjective

There can no more be a best possible world than there can be a largest number. What does "a largest number" mean here? What is the difference in that sentence between "the" and "a"?
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1answer
33 views

Doubts about using an ellipsis within a quotation and outside a quotation

In many books, authors end their quotations by using ". . . ." (a period to end the sentence and an ellipsis to indicate ommited material). Is it acceptable to apply the same structure in sentences ...
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3answers
68 views

Omission of “there is” in a clause

Is this an omission (ellipsis)? What is this omission called in linguistics? What has changed in the interim, to my knowledge, is a huge explosion of self- and mutual-admiration among those who ...
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2answers
62 views

How can an adjective follow and modify an adverb in “somewhere new”? Is this ellipsis?

I would like to go somewhere new tonight. I met someone nice at the party Are the preceding two sentences the same as the following, but with ellipsis applied? I would like to go somewhere [that is] ...
2
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3answers
131 views

Can preposition “to” be omitted in this case

Aston Martin’s IPO will provide further clues to which category ultra-expensive carmakers really belong. its context:economist Grammatically,you need to have " clues to which..." and " to which.....
6
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1answer
112 views

Gapping comma in a list

Consider the following sentence: The baker may seem to be a gentleman, the butcher may seem to be a rascal, and the candlestick maker may seem to be a fool. Since the verb phrase "may seem to be" ...
2
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1answer
39 views

Usage of colon versus ellipsis when restating a definition

I'm editing a paper and came across a sentence which uses an ellipsis to separate the main idea from a restatement as follows: The suspicion that the butler committed the murder was just that... a ...
2
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2answers
108 views

Does “me” take singular verb form?

I have seen a meme which confuses me: "At 18: Others: have partners, do drugs etc. Me: watches tv and sleeps Is this grammatically correct and does "me" take singular verb form? I ...
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1answer
88 views

How do you mark a bulleted list with a common stem sentence? [duplicate]

How do you mark a bulleted list with a common stem sentence? For example: Do you capitalize each item and use a colon? This Summer we should: Go to the beach. Eat a sandwich. Visit the library. Do ...
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1answer
24 views

Using the Ellipsis at the End of a Page [closed]

I am writing an Introductory page for my book. Being that it is the last sentence on the page, would it be OK to say, "Let's get on with the story... " or would I write "Let's get on with the story."? ...
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19 views

Is it grammatically correct to omit a comma after dialogue ending in an ellipsis? [duplicate]

I know that Grammarly isn't always correct but before tonight, I didn't know punctuation directly after an ellipsis was grammatically correct, even in special circumstances such as dialogue. Unless ...
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2answers
83 views

Ellipsis related to subjunctive mood? [closed]

You Sunk My Carrier: How the Navy Could Sink China's New Aircraft Carriers That means war. Here's how it goes down. by James Holmes National Interest.org Although It is certain that an ...
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1answer
81 views

Can a sentence have no verb except in what would otherwise be its noun phrase?

Can a sentence have no verb except in what would otherwise be its noun phrase? e.g. The car in the street I walk down. I'm guessing that "the street I walk down" would be the noun phrase, and it ...
2
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2answers
58 views

2 or more dots is an ellipsis … or something else?

As a transcriber, I have seen many ways dots are used in literature —mostly to avoid redundancy. But I have seen dots unspaced from single letters, such as in the phrase "Guess the city: N.. Y..." The ...
2
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1answer
408 views

“Although in poor health, she continued…” vs “No matter how poor her health, she continued…”

The following is grammar question from an English as a second language exam My girlfriend was showing me a copy of the exam she took several years ago after finishing high school. We were looking at ...
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1answer
220 views

Can I use an ellipsis at the beginning of a quote? [closed]

Can I use an ellipsis at the beginning of a quote? The quote I have used had multiple sentences and I only wanted a few of the sentences so I took out part of the quote: "...The witness for the ...
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2answers
76 views

when I held the assembly that women are fun I were just lying

"when I held the assembly that women are fun I were just lying" The speaker had previously said so to an assembly of workmates. What does the sentence mean? The sentence can be heard (with the ...
3
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1answer
48 views

“Go before the numbers build”

In Mark Ravenhill's The Cane, there is a line which I think it's a slang, but I can't find any references on the net. Please help me: Maureen: Which is why I’ve invited the Head here today. I want ...
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1answer
53 views

What does “… …” mean over chats or posts? [closed]

I wonder in a text what does "... ..." mean? For example, someone comments "... ..." on a picture. I tried looking at Urban Dictionary, but it didn't work.
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0answers
67 views

Is it ok to use just “Careful!” instead of ”Be careful!” preceded by “be”?

Is it “correct” if I say Careful! here without be in front of it? Careful! There is a car coming! Careful! Just one step back and you will fall off the cliff.
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2answers
277 views

Should repeated words after an ellipsis be capitalized?

I've searched everywhere, including questions about whether to capitalize after a stutter (no), capitalize after an ellipsis (no if it's a continuation of a sentence, yes if it's a new sentence), but ...
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2answers
69 views

“Straight down that way, then a *hard* to the left” : noun, or rather adj of elliptical material?

From Shameless US, season 9 episode 5, minute 20:12: Straight down that way, then a hard to the left. Here is a transcript of the episode. Is hard here a noun, or rather adj of elliptical ...
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1answer
218 views

How to omit lines when quoting a play

I am citing the play All My Sons in an essay I am writing. I don't want to have a lot of unnecessary content in my quotes and I am not too familiar with quoting plays, so I want to ask how I should ...
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1answer
74 views

Proper grammar with ellipsis?

Bear with me, please. Consider this sentence: "He might've turned his head and seen the incident, but I'm not sure." This sounds awkward, but it makes sense, as seen agrees with might have. But ...
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1answer
70 views

That's you (that table is for you / is your table) [closed]

A waitress, who is going to serve a dish to a lady, says "That's you" pointing towards an empty table, at which the lady sits. The scene is from the series Shameless, s07e08, min 5:40 What does "...
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1answer
42 views

“in favor” used adverbially

I'd like to know whether the phrase "in favor" can be used adverbially, e.g. They all voted in favor.
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203 views

What do we call the process of dropping the subject at the beginning of a sentence?

In casual conversation I've been noticing this more and more in my own speaking as well as others. The subject will be missing from the beginning of the sentence and instead it's inferred as the ...
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1answer
318 views

Using commas in cases of “extreme contrast” (commas in compound predicates with “but”)

It seems to me that many, including myself recently, are applying this "extreme contrast" rule to the wrong cases (see #2; purdue.edu). Specifically, I mean...you can't put a single comma between ...
5
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2answers
863 views

Help me to explain this sentence's grammar

Global temperatures have already risen 0.9℃ and continental temperatures 1.5℃ degrees above pre-industrial levels" This is a sentence from an essay about ice melting and environment changing. It ...
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1answer
565 views

Comma use when omitting a repeated verb (ellipsis)

I am 'querying' an agent... And I would like to keep grammar mistakes and infelicities down to a manageable dozen. So here goes: In the following sentence, "In the story, Gilgamesh is king, and ...
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3answers
929 views

“Everyone is fine and having fun” or “Everyone is fine and is having fun.”

While both sentences are probably grammatical, I’m wondering which one is preferable. To me, the first sentence sounds awkward, but the second sentence may have an unnecessary is. Basing your answers ...
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2answers
432 views

“In 200 meters slight left” - Google Maps grammatical mistake? [closed]

When Google Maps gives directions, it says "In 200 meters slight left". There is no verb in this sentence. Is it grammatically correct or just a mistake by Google?
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0answers
161 views

omission of infinitive marker: i.e., He'll come, if he wants (to)

To me, these He'll come, if he wants He'll come, if he's able He'll come, if I allow him are simply variants of He'll come, if he wants to He'll come, if he's able to He'll ...
2
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1answer
274 views

What does an ellipses mean when it is between paragraphs?

So I was reading a narrative and I came across an ellipse. I know that ellipses are used sometimes to mark ommissions in a quote, however, what does it mean when it is used between paragraphs - and I'...
3
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3answers
206 views

Proper ellipsis [linguistic] for “Yes/No” questions/answers containing “do + like”

Is it grammatically correct to say/write the following Q: Do you like to eat ice cream/apples...? A: No, I don't like [to eat apples]./ Yes, I like [to eat apples]. Is it necessary to include the ...
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0answers
44 views

“You mean the guy who sells fruit?” or “Do you mean the guy who sells fruit?” [duplicate]

In conversation, which is correct: You mean the one with the guy who sells fruit? or Do you mean the one with the guy who sells fruit? My ESL student has asked me why we don't always include ...
3
votes
1answer
276 views

Why isn’t “It’s” a complete sentence, but “It is” is? [duplicate]

I’m a native English speaker, so I understand that It’s. is not a complete sentence, whereas the sentence It is. is a complete sentence. What linguistic mechanism prevents “It’s.” from being ...
3
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1answer
2k views

Capitalization of a word after an ellipsis

Should I capitalize the word "don't" in the following sentence? Listen... don’t panic.
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1answer
88 views

What does 'back up with' mean? [closed]

The expression comes from the following meme of Stevie Wonder How I feel while backing up with 5% window tint I think it's some kind of insulting the blinds. I don't enjoy those things, but the ...
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0answers
61 views

How would you punctuate a separate sentence within parentheses with an ellipsis at the end?

For context: I think the whipped cream really helps cut through the strong alcohol taste, and >it also adds some fat, so give it a shot! (No pun intended…) Do I need to put a period/full stop ...
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4answers
4k views

Relative pronouns “where” and “when”: where can they be omitted?

I know the "omitting-rules" regarding the relative pronouns who/which/that and whose. How does it work with where and when? In the first sentence I cannot omit where but I can easily omit when in the ...
2
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1answer
159 views

Is “He is, and so is Ryan and McConnell” grammatical?

This is a portion of a recent reader comment for an article in the Washington Post: "[Trump] leaves himself open to the charge that he is violating his oath of office" He is, and so is Ryan ...
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1answer
2k views

What does “you like stick” and “I like aerosol” mean?

This is a part of a song named Fools by Australian singer Troye Sivan. I don’t get the meaning of the third line. I get the literal meaning of stick and aerosol, but I don’t think a piece of wood and ...
2
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3answers
155 views

Shall I get us a Chinese for dinner tonight? [duplicate]

Is this sentence grammatically correct? Shall I get us a Chinese for dinner tonight? I saw this in a book and it looks a bit strange to me. Should there be an article before the word Chinese? ...
0
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1answer
116 views

“There’s a horse running a pal of mine owns a leg of” [closed]

What does the sentence in bold mean? It from the movie 'Poirot': Poirot: And you, Hastings, do not you run away with such celerity. I have work for you too. Hastings: Oh! Er... As a matter ...
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0answers
151 views

“good lay in” --> what does “in” stand for here?

What is the exact function of the word "in" here? Richard, I’ve had the last good lay in an old whore, and it had to be in front of the mirror. For the context of this sentence, see this article. ...
3
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2answers
641 views

Is it common to end a sentence with “very”?

I've read Practical English Usage by M. Swan to get the notion of ellipsis and find out whether it is possible to make a sentence below but I got to nowhere. It ends with "very" and I'm not sure ...
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0answers
365 views

Do the ellipsis/ellipses (…) replace commas?

There is contradicting information on how to use the ellipsis/ellipses (and contradicting information on what its exact name is called--but that's irrelevant) so I'll ask. And I know it's mostly a ...
0
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1answer
418 views

Singular/plural forms of objects with “respectively” [closed]

Which of the following two sentences is correct? A and B are the minimum and maximum value, respectively. A and B are the minimum and maximum values, respectively. I tend to think that the first one ...

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