Questions tagged [eighteenth-century-english]

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3answers
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Publick or Public? in the 18th and 19th Century Britain

The spelling of -ck was more popular than -c in many words in Britain. But in America, Noah Webster proposed around 1800 to replace -ck by -c, which caused the widespread of this -c spelling in US. In ...
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1answer
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Why wasn't it phony, overblown to close with “most obedient servant”?

I'm aware of this answer: Today, "Your obedient servant" may sound extravagant and highly ornamental; but in the second half of the eighteenth century, when it first became popular, it must ...
4
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4answers
2k views

18th Century British-English - “Know not” vs “Don't know”

I'm trying to write some dialogue for a character who lives in 18th century England. I want the dialogue to sound as accurate as possible, but I'm not sure what the proper phrasing should be. I ...
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1answer
687 views

What's the difference between “conjoined” and “connected”?

In "An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding", Hume says1: All events seem entirely loose and separate. One event follows another; but we never can observe any tie between them. They seem ...
4
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2answers
1k views

What is the meaning of this long line in this sentense?

I am reading "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen and encountered a strange dash in this sentence: "The officers of the ---- shire were in general [...]" ---- is a long line and not four single dashes....
2
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2answers
370 views

Why was the subject and verb inverted in a declarative sentence?

Preface: I ask only about the syntax and not semantics; I comprehend the meaning behind the following quote (for a paraphrase in 20C English; see p 27 of 35), but I am inexperienced with Early Modern ...
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2answers
69 views

How to dissect/parse 'nave in so many places wilfully corrupted the scripture' ? (1786 UK)

Source: p 175, The Catholic Christian Instructed in the Sacraments ..., by Richard Challoner, 1786 But as for those that have vowed a chastity, they must make use of other means to prevent this ...
1
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1answer
161 views

Should this relative clause, headed by 'where', be joined to the main clause? (1786 UK)

Source: p 174, The Catholic Christian Instructed in the Sacraments ..., by Richard Challoner, 1786 Q. But does not Christ say, concerning continency, St. Matt. xix. 11, 'All men cannot receive this ...
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1answer
52 views

Grammaticality: 'gift … will not be denied him' (1786 UK)

Source: p 174, The Catholic Christian Instructed in the Sacraments ..., by Richard Challoner, 1786 A. Continency is not required of all, but such as have by vow engaged to keep it: and ...
57
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6answers
53k views

What were the rules for capitalising nouns in the 17th and 18th centuries?

It seems to have been common practice in the 17th and 18th centuries in English-language sources to capitalise the first letters of nouns, as in At which Time he prov'd himself the Noah's Dove, that ...