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14
votes
3answers
2k views

Recent trends in English grammar

A lot of questions have been dedicated to how the evolution of English got many constructs of the old either fall out of use, merge, or evolve into different forms but still with 1:1 relation to ...
1
vote
2answers
501 views

Shakespeare's Macbeth “Conduct me to (mine) host” Mine host vs My Host

The first time I heard "mine host" in Shakespeare's Macbeth, I went to Wiktionary to see if it once was used instead of "my," however, I ended up with that it should not be followed by a noun but ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the grammar behind 'if either thee dislike'?

This sentence appears in Shakespeare's 'Romeo and Juliet': Juliet: My ears have yet drunk a hundred words, Of thy tone's uttering, and yet I know the sound. Art thou not Romeo, and a Montague? Romeo: ...
4
votes
1answer
233 views

Is “Be ye…” subjunctive or imperative?

In Early Modern English, the second person plural (singular) declensions were: Nominative: - Ye (Thou) Oblique: - You (Thee) --and-- Genitive: Your (Thy & Thine) & Yours' (...
3
votes
0answers
231 views

Does Early Modern English Have Ablative Case? [closed]

I was thinking the other day, and a phrase popped into my mind that sounds as if I have heard it before, and I quickly realized it is not grammatically correct {on the surface.} It is: "Get thee mee ...
-4
votes
1answer
1k views

Do vs Dost, the difference [closed]

"Thou coward knight, why wilt thou not do battle with me?" -The Age of Chivalry, Chapter 16 In this sentence, why is do not dost? Very commonly do I see the word dost be used in older text in place ...
6
votes
3answers
291 views

In EModE should 'may' become 'mayest' when expressing a wish

I'm translating a text from Sanskrit, which has a singular/plural (and, actually, dual) distinction in the second person. It has long been the custom in English translation to render the 2nd singular ...
1
vote
2answers
325 views

What is the grammatical designation of “that” in “…that she may have…”?

The following sentence is the Modern English translation of a line from the Old English poem Judith: He (God) advanced a gracious favour to her, that she may have a steadfast faith. My question ...
7
votes
4answers
1k views

“That heresies should arise, we have the prophesie of Christ…”

That heresies should arise, we have the prophesie of Christ; but that old ones should be abolished, we hold no prediction. This is a quote from Religio Medici (1643) by Thomas Browne. It's quoted in ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Why is the Elizabethan English incorrect in this quote?

I saw a Geico commercial with Elizabethan verb forms that bothered me because they were being misused: Trick Number 1. Lookest over there! Servant looks Haha! Madest thou look! So endest the ...
0
votes
1answer
862 views

Thee or thou in these sentences: [duplicate]

Think thee that I would desert thee? Think thee that I don't care? or: Think thou that I would desert thee? Think thou that I don't care? Which one is right?
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Future Subjunctive

I have a few issues to discuss linked to the Future Subjunctive. 1) Can "If I were you." mean the same as "If I were to be you." In other words, can "If I were you." have the reference to the future ...