Questions tagged [doubled-consonants]

Questions about double consonants, such as the "tt" in "sitting".

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
1 answer
134 views

Why no double "v" in "river" or "quiver"?

After googling around for a while, I was unable to see anything that explained either causality or history/etymology for the single "v" in either "river" (why not "rivver"...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
66 views

Why is double -ll- used after a vowel digraph in "surveilled, surveilling"?

Why is the letter l double in the inflections of the verb surveil? It's not in those of (as)sail or veil, and AmE has canceled but mostly cancellation. It's a counterintuitive spelling similar to ...
user avatar
  • 2,187
1 vote
0 answers
40 views

Why is the "r" doubled in "arrhythmia"? [duplicate]

Why is the "r" doubled in "arrhythmia" relative to "rhythmia"? I'm guessing it's because English resists hyphenation of prefixes and suffixes ("a-rhythmia"), ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
52 views

"Bias": reason(s) for doubling the last consonant before inflectional endings

Forms such as concussed or discusses may lead people to wrongly double the final consonant of focus ―at least that's the only reason I have come up with. Yet, I cannot come up with a potential ...
user avatar
  • 2,187
0 votes
1 answer
436 views

Is there a rule why the correct spelling for "Marketing" is not " Marketting"? [duplicate]

I have always assumed that you doubled the consonant when the vowel preceding it is short. bet and betting for example; Why is this different for market and marketing?
user avatar
  • 131
19 votes
1 answer
5k views

Why is the past tense of vomit generally spelled 'vomited' rather than 'vomitted'? [duplicate]

"Vomit" is not a recent addition to English, and nor does it have a peculiar pronunciation. Yet, the past tense of vomit does not follow the notion that a vowel followed by a consonant and emphasis on ...
user avatar
  • 343
0 votes
0 answers
58 views

What's the rule for doubling 't' in verbs like 'getting' vs. 'targeting' [duplicate]

In verbs that end with "et", what is the rule for doubling the final consonant for present participle? Examples where doubling is used: getting typesetting forgetting Examples where a single 't' is ...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
251 views

Can a plosive consonant in a word be pronounced as an unreleased consonant?

ESL teachers always tell people to suppress the normal release of the consonant "p b k g t d" if it's at the end of a word and the next word also begins with a consonant. But what about words with a ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
773 views

'Histogramed' or 'histogrammed'?

The following rule (or 'rule', this being English) is sometimes quoted: If a word has two or more syllables, double the final consonant when adding a suffix if and only if the final syllable is ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
476 views

Why does "inferred" have two Rs while "inference" doesn't?

Earlier today I spelled "infered" with one R and my handy editor promptly added some red squiggles. Acknowledging the error of my ways I added the missing R happy carried only writing my document. ...
user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
819 views

Australian English: developed or developped?

According to https://proofreadmydocument.com.au/writing-tips/spelling-tips-the-doubling-up-rule/ and https://www.macquariedictionary.com.au/resources/view/resource/20/, we should spell the past ...
user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
505 views

Is "buffeted" the AmE version of the BrE word "buffetted"?

I am referring to the use of the verb "to buffet" meaning "(especially of wind or waves) strike repeatedly and violently; batter." The use of "buffeted" and "buffeting" is widespread. However use ...
user avatar
  • 6,078
4 votes
2 answers
9k views

Why do we write "fixing" instead of "fixxing"?

When we have one vowel and one consonant and we want to add 'ing', we usually double the last consonant. Why don't we add an extra 'x' to the word 'fix'? We don't double 'w' and 'y' maybe because they ...
user avatar
  • 97
4 votes
1 answer
141 views

How do native English speakers pronounce words with contiguous hard consonants?

For example, in the word blindness the d and n are quite different and I find it hard to pronounce the d explicitly without making a brief pause. In normal and fast speaking, is it common to omit the ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
6k views

Are "worshiping" and "worshipping" interchangeable? [closed]

Every online source seems to agree with the preconceived notion I had that the correct usage is "worshipping" with two p's, saying that "worshipping" is an exception to a rule about doubling the ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
2k views

What are the rules when to use double letters for words that end with a consonant when modified both in British English and in American English? [duplicate]

Example of such words are: http://grammarist.com/spelling/cancel/ http://grammarist.com/spelling/travel/ As far as I know, at least in American English, words that have single syllable double their ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
241 views

Is there a grammar rule for nouns coming from verbs? [duplicate]

I'd like to know if there is a grammar rule stating when the last consonant of the verb has to be doubled. E.g. why: "to cut" -> cutter, "to program" -> programmer, but "to read" -> reader?
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
12k views

Why "controlled" not "controled"? [duplicate]

Unlike British English and other varieties, American English does not double the letter "l" in words such as "traveled", "canceled", etc. However, it does with the word "controlled". Is there any ...
user avatar
  • 1,404
4 votes
2 answers
10k views

Why do we have double letters?

I'm wondering why we have double letters in words that make the same sound as if it were a single letter. For example apple. The pp makes a p sound, and sound the same as if the word was spelt aple. ...
user avatar
  • 149
0 votes
0 answers
1k views

Silent Letters In Words Containing Double Letters

I'm doing an exercise, which says find the silent letters in some words. one of them is "OFFICE" Does this word have 1 or 2 silent letters? The final 'E'     Or     final 'E' + one of 'F's Are double ...
user avatar
11 votes
3 answers
5k views

Why is the 'L' in detailed not doubled?

I cannot quite understand why the 'L' is not doubled when forming 'detailed' from 'detail'. Is that an exemption to the consonant doubling, or did I simply not understand the rules? From the answers ...
user avatar
  • 377
6 votes
2 answers
6k views

Is it "transferrer" or "transferer"?

According to thefreedictionary, "transferrer" is someone who transfers something. However, it also lists the alternate spelling "transferer", with only one r in the middle. For the related "...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
1k views

When double "l" is considered American English?

I'm struggling with "enroll" and "enrollment". Both answers (this one and this one), given to this question, as well as Wikipedia seems to be suggesting, that double "l" is more common in British ...
user avatar
  • 154
2 votes
1 answer
3k views

Double Consonants in Gerund

Is there any rules regarding gerund that tell when to double the consonant of a word and when not to? I'm a little bit confused regarding this matter. Based on this link there are words that can be ...
user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
37k views

Why is "batting" spelled with two t's, but "combating" spelled with one?

The "bating" in "combating" is pronounced the exact same way as "batting". It doesn't make sense to me.
user avatar
  • 49
7 votes
2 answers
2k views

Other special hyphenation examples than eight-teen

According to The TeXbook [Don Knuth, 1984], solution to Exercise 14.8, the word eighteen should be hyphenated eight-teen. It is, indeed, standard practice in pre-reform German to contract triple ...
user avatar
  • 205
5 votes
4 answers
969 views

Adding an L when appending an -ium suffix to a word? (Metallium vs. Metalium)

I am Romanizing a business name from Hebrew, and am wondering what the most appealing or 'correct' spelling might be - 'Metallium' or 'Metalium'. The owners of the business went with the latter, but ...
user avatar
  • 151
22 votes
1 answer
9k views

Why is "fridge" spelt with a 'd' but "refrigeration" spelt without one?

The question is in the title, why does the word, refrigeration not have a 'd' in it when fridge does?
user avatar
  • 493
5 votes
1 answer
21k views

Why is "happened" spelled with a single "n"? [duplicate]

I've seen the words plan -> planned, planning begin -> beginning Why is "happen" different and why is "happenning" an incorrect spelling?
user avatar
  • 161
-1 votes
2 answers
3k views

How is the past tense of "error" spelt in British English? [duplicate]

How is the past tense of "error" spelt in British English? Wiktionary says that it's "errored", but its entry for errored doesn't explicitly say it's valid for British English, and I thought it'd get ...
user avatar
  • 17.8k
37 votes
3 answers
217k views

“Programming” versus “programing”: which is preferred?

I was surprised that my spell checker did not complain for programing with one m, so I Googled it, and found on free dictionaries that both forms were acceptable. Which one is more common? Does it ...
0 votes
1 answer
1k views

Pronunciation of a double C [closed]

I always pronounce words like "accelerate" and "eccentric" as "asselerate" or "eesentric". I don't know why but the "ks" that I hear in common pronunciation irks me. Is it correct to pronounce the c's ...
user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
21k views

Past participle form of "exit"?

What's the past participle form of the word exit? Is it exit (irregular, like set)? exited? exitted? On one page I found exited but if that's the case why isn't it exitted (double t) like with the ...
user avatar
  • 487
26 votes
3 answers
77k views

Is "targetted" a standard British English spelling?

Wiktionary says that the difference between "targetting" and "targeting" is that the first one is a British spelling and the second one is American. Meanwhile, Oxford Dictionaries says that "...
user avatar
  • 441
15 votes
5 answers
27k views

"Cancellation", "Canceled", "Canceling" — US usage

I'm trying to figure out if there is a specific rule behind the word "cancel" that would cause "cancellation" to have two L's, but "canceled" and "canceling" to have only one (in the US). I ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
259 views

"Traveller" vs. "traveler" [duplicate]

There was a time when traveller's cheques were emitted and sold by the banks in England and by Thomas Cook. However the cheques emitted by American banks/American Express were named traveler's cheque, ...
user avatar
23 votes
3 answers
104k views

Plural of 'yes'

What is the plural of yes? Googling brings up many different suggestions from different sources. Yesses Yeses Yes's Yes' ?
user avatar
  • 1,223
10 votes
2 answers
906 views

Why does "agree" have only one "g"?

According to Webster, agree comes from Latin ad + gratus. However there are other words such as aggregate and aggression that also come from ad + [something], and these words are spelled with a double ...
user avatar
  • 201
1 vote
0 answers
2k views

What is the rule for duplicating the last letter when adding "-ed"? [duplicate]

I wonder if there is any rule for doubling the p at the end of a stem. For example: stop — stopped but help — helped
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
2k views

programme or program [duplicate]

I am wondering which is the correct version? Furthermore, the official length of my programme of study: 3.5 years of full-time study and 16 weeks of internship. Furthermore, the official ...
user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
21k views

Does the word "Vaccum" exist?

If yes, does it have the same meaning of vacuum? Ref: Vacuum (Wikipedia) Vaccum.org (dead link / domain not in use; verified on 28.12.2020). Both the sites define the same meaning, but the spelling ...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
7k views

Why is "writing" spelled with only one T? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there any rhyme or reason to when one should double the last consonant when adding -ed or -ing? It has always been a word that intuitively I wish to spell with two Ts. So ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
2k views

For the verb 'focus' why is the gerund form 'focusing' with a single S, instead of 'focussing' with a double S? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Focussed” or “focused”? The double consonant The rule that I learned was that when you have a short vowel in the last syllable, you double the last consonant before adding ...
user avatar
  • 698
2 votes
2 answers
49k views

"Godness" vs. "goddess"

I've noticed people use (in speech) the word godness for "feminine god", e.g.: Oh my godness! However, in classic texts it is goddess, e.g. Shakespeare's "King Lear": Hear, nature, hear; dear ...
user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
112k views

"Dilemma" vs. "dilemna" [closed]

I understand the correct spelling is 'dilemma' but many people I've spoken with, including myself, were convinced the spelling was 'dilemna'. A quick search on google shows this is not isolated to ...
user avatar
18 votes
2 answers
93k views

What's the difference between 'modeling' and 'modelling'? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is “L” doubled? If I am using the word model in the context of financial models and the UK, then which of these words should I use? Also, are there any key ...
user avatar
  • 199
12 votes
5 answers
4k views

"Plugable" or "pluggable"

When it comes to programming copy edits, there are lots of words that would otherwise be thrown out or replaced. Hive uses a plugable design. Should that be plugable or pluggable? If the ...
user avatar
  • 457
19 votes
2 answers
37k views

Why is "fulfil" spelt as "fulfill" in American English?

In this answer, simplification is stated as one reason for spelling variations in American English. But unlike in color and favorite, the number of letters to spell the word in fulfil increases in ...
user avatar
  • 15.8k
10 votes
3 answers
93k views

Why is the plural of "quiz" spelled with double Z?

The plural of "quiz" is spelled with double "z" while the plural of "box" (and sometimes "bus") is spelled with a single last consonant. Why is it so? Is this the general rule to double the last ...
user avatar
10 votes
2 answers
27k views

Dropping L in compound adjectives. Is it "skillful" or "skilful"?

We have been taught at school that when a word ending in "LL" helps form a compound word, "LL" becomes "L" (e.g. skill -> skilful). I have also come across the usage of this adjective as skillful (...
user avatar