Questions tagged [double-possessive]

for questions about using two different possessive markers, like “of Bob’s” or “of mine”

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The Double Genitive with Animals? [migrated]

Can I use the double possessive below as I would in, say, the phrase a friend of Bob’s? a bone of my dog’s a toy of my dog’s Are the phrases above, however awkward, still grammatical? Never mind ...
Jmarlowe's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
76 views

"He is a friend of Tom and mine" "He is my and Tom's friend" [duplicate]

I have read all the related Q&A I could find on here, but there didn't seem to be one that answers my question exactly. There was one question that was related, but I don't think this would be a ...
desmo's user avatar
  • 521
-1 votes
1 answer
109 views

"Of his" or "of him" in this situation?

The sentence I saw on a TV series: I wanna grab him by that stupid knit tie of his. First I saw it, I thought it is incorrect because I only saw the use of "of him" before. Is this ...
cetinkaya's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
147 views

Are phrases of the form "A <possession> of <name>'s" grammatically correct?

I recently found myself about to write "David, using a metaphor of Saul's, said...", with the intended meaning that Saul had coined the metaphor (rather than it being a metaphor involving ...
sdenham's user avatar
  • 189
1 vote
1 answer
139 views

NPs containing double genitives: "this harassment of her of yours"

I am interested in which nominal phrases of the general form Article + Noun + of + Accusative pronoun + of + Genitive pronoun sound more or less grammatical to most speakers. Primarily, what ...
Zoltan's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
102 views

Double possessive when thing possessed is plural

"This year we planned a cruise with four friends of ours." I've only ever seen a double possessive with words that are singular. For example, "I am a friend of Bob's" or "It's the password of Mark's."...
Arthur Graves's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
269 views

Are both these sentences grammatically correct? [duplicate]

I have recently found the following. I do know the first sentence is wrong. (1) "I am not a fan of him." Meaning : I am not his fan. (2) I am not a fan of his. Meaning : I am not one of his ...
Sandip Kumar Mandal's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
515 views

Apostrophe 's, "of", or nothing to show possession/ownership?

Let's go straight forward, the subject is NOT using 's or of, but why sometime we should show possession/ownership using 's or of, why sometime not ? Examples: The family name = the name of the ...
Donatello's user avatar
  • 117
10 votes
1 answer
1k views

Why does English employ double possessive pronouns such as theirs and ours?

I am a native speaker of AmE. I understand when and where to use their vs theirs, etc. etc. (i.e. Don't migrate this to ELL!). I've searched the site and google, and I have not quite seen an answer ...
David M's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
194 views

What's the difference between "the seat in front of you" and "the seat in front of yours"? [duplicate]

I came across an airline announcement and the following question arose. Which would you say it is THE correct sentence, and why? For your comfort and safety, please stow the luggage labelled with the ...
JonnyBgood's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
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friend of the familyname's or familynames [duplicate]

Is it "John is a friend of the Smith's." or "John is a friend of the Smiths." ? Thank you for your answer :)
Vincent Quirion's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
112 views

Double Posessive Usage [duplicate]

In the following instances of possessive, genitive: 1) It has taken Dan's father's breath away. Is the possessive grammatically, correctly used? or should it be: It has taken Dan's father ...
Tommy's user avatar
  • 306
2 votes
1 answer
128 views

Possessive of a possessive [duplicate]

There is a sign at my work that says "Join the fight for Alzheimer's first survivor" and I am wondering about the use of "Alzheimer's" here. They are not reffering to a survivor of Alzheimer, they are ...
Sdarb's user avatar
  • 151
0 votes
1 answer
58 views

Use of the possessive

Is the possessive apostrophe "s" added to family? "I am a friend of Conor's and his family. vs I am a friend of Conor's and his family's?
Butsch's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
263 views

I have this sentence: 'They were no longer afraid of losing the respect of their colleagues.' Do I need an apostrophe after 'colleagues' or not?

I'm not sure if you can possess respect. I think if I had worded it differently, such as 'They were no longer afraid of losing their colleagues' respect' I wouldn't have a problem with the apostrophe, ...
Hannah's user avatar
  • 3
6 votes
2 answers
44k views

A friend of John's / John's friend

The question: Suppose John is my friend, and I am introducing myself to his brother, should I say "I am a friend of John's" or "I am John's friend" ?? I would use the former, but some ...
WWang's user avatar
  • 69
2 votes
1 answer
2k views

Why is the double possessive grammatically correct in the sentence, "Joe is a friend of Jim's"? [duplicate]

I've read a bit about the reason for using the double possessive but there are still a few aspects that don't work for me: If the difference between "Joe is a friend of Jim's" and "Joe is a friend of ...
Ilan Katz's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
148 views

Rule governing of and apostrophe in the same sentence [duplicate]

A paragraph on the Wikipedia page on Gerolamo Cardano begins thus: The title of a work of Cardano's, published in 1552 ... I believe this to be the correct usage, although I wonder if The ...
Kedar Mhaswade's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
7k views

When and why we use double-genitive with respect to the word 'of'?

I wanted to know why and when to use double-genitive. So for example why can't we use 'I am a fan of YOU' instead of 'I am fan of YOURS'. This is so as using the word 'of' itself meant that the noun ...
Unknown's user avatar
  • 31
2 votes
1 answer
2k views

Why is "Two friends of my parents' have just left..." grammatically correct?

I just trying to solve this, but my English is not so good. Could anyone help me? Why is the letter a) correct? thanks a lot in advance Complete the following sentence: "Two ________ have just left ...
iamgiulio's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
22k views

Double possession dilemma: should I say “your” or “yours”?

What is the best way to say this? Because of yours and the John Wichel Foundation’s grant we are able to continue our mission to serve all Texans with diabetes. Should it be Because of your ...
Rlativity1's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
4k views

The use of "that of" and an apostrophe

Here is my sentence: "Julia's experience is similar to that of Robert's." Would it be correct to put an apostrophe ('s) after Robert?
Maria W1234's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
382 views

Alternative for double genitive in "the author's master's thesis"

Im my PhD thesis I'm referring to my master's thesis. Avoiding first person, I would refer to it as "the/this author's master's thesis", but the double genitive s sounds clumsy to me. Are there ...
Sebastian's user avatar
  • 225
3 votes
3 answers
3k views

The house of a friend of Bob’s

How do I say (a friend of Bob’s)’s house? It’s like a double possesive. Bob’s friends are a class of people. Tom, a friend of Bob’s denotes that he is one among Bob’s friends. Now what if I want to ...
user261849's user avatar
44 votes
7 answers
114k views

Why is "our today's meeting" wrong?

One of the answers to this question states that "We shall discuss it in our today's meeting" is grammatically correct. To me, that sentence is clearly wrong. While in today's meeting is ...
terdon's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
2k views

Possessive apostrophe for owner of owner of owner of

I've read Preferred way to apostrophise in case of dual or multiple ownership by distinct entities and "Nikki's and Alice's X" vs. "Nikki and Alice's X", but my ...
ForeignStudent's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
4k views

"A friend of my father" vs. "a friend of my father's" — which one is right? Why? [duplicate]

I have seen them both in my reference book, which is written by a native speaker. I wonder why there are two different phrases to describe the same meaning and am looking forward to some reasonable ...
Ning Guo's user avatar
  • 115
1 vote
1 answer
2k views

"his" may be more suitable but why is "him" not ok ? [duplicate]

Consider the following : A friend of him came here yesterday. A friend of his came here yesterday. My question is which one is acceptable. If both are acceptable, do they have any difference in ...
Stanley's user avatar
  • 361
-1 votes
1 answer
781 views

Usage of both apostrophe and “of” together [duplicate]

I was reading Agatha Christie’s The Murder of Roger Ackroyd and noticed following sentence: About those boots of Ralph Paton’s. It is really in old (old as in early or mid twentieth century) ...
abhinavkulkarni's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
11k views

Is it correct to say "a friend of X and mine" if both X and I know each other and the friend?

As I understand it, if X and Y independently have the same friend Z, we should write Z is a friend of X's and Y's but if X and Y collectively have Z as a friend (e.g., X and Y are a couple), then ...
Shou Saito's user avatar
3 votes
5 answers
1k views

Question Regarding Possessives with ('s) and (of) [duplicate]

Question: Is the first one redundant and proper, or is it redundant and not necessarily correct? (1) He is a friend of Doug's. (2) He is a friend of Doug.
Patrick T. Randolph's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
201 views

What's the difference between "a picture of the king" and "a picture of the king's"? [closed]

A picture of the king. A picture of the king's. What exactly is the difference between the two?
Yujin's user avatar
  • 21
9 votes
1 answer
16k views

"A friend of Susan" vs. "a friend of Susan's" [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is it usually “friend of his”, but no possessive apostrophe with “friend of Peter”? I'm currently having hot debates with a friend of mine about which one is more natural ...
zerkms's user avatar
  • 536
19 votes
6 answers
28k views

Why 'a friend of mine' is not 'my friend's friend'?

I have some questions about the expression "a friend of mine" and I'm quite confused with it. Actually I have found some threads about this topic but they don't hit my point. I'm not a native English ...
Étudiant's user avatar
  • 211
1 vote
4 answers
897 views

Double genitive

Which of the following is grammatical? That action would not increase my satisfaction, but the one of my driver's. That action would not increase my satisfaction but my driver's one I ...
Frank's user avatar
  • 596
1 vote
2 answers
7k views

A friend of Jane and Tom or A friend of Jane and Tom's?

We can say: She's a friend of mine. She's a friend of Tom's. She's a friend of my parents'. But today I saw this: She's a friend of Jane and Tom. Is it correct? Or should it be: She's a friend of ...
HQQ's user avatar
  • 355
6 votes
2 answers
157k views

Plural possessive with separate possessions

When we refer to a house that belongs to a family, we say "family's house". Pluralizing family gives us "families". Referring to the houses of several families, we say "families' houses". Forming the ...
yoozer8's user avatar
  • 8,742
36 votes
10 answers
13k views

Why is it usually "friend of his", but no possessive apostrophe with "friend of Peter"?

As this NGram shows, we nearly always use the possessive form of personal pronouns for friend of mine/his/ours/etc. But when it comes to actual names, we prefer friend of Peter without the possessive ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
1k views

Isn’t the expression, "I'm not inclined to be a supporter of Newt Gingrich's having served under him for four years” confusing?

I found the following line in today’s (December 4) Time magazine article titled, Coburn Speaks Up: “On "Fox News Sunday," Sooner State Sen. tells Chris Wallace he would have trouble supporting ...
Yoichi Oishi's user avatar
  • 70.2k
8 votes
2 answers
12k views

Why do we say "of mine/of his" instead of "of me/of him"?

He's a friend of mine. That's a car of his. Why do we use the possessive when the meaning would be the same while not using it (e.g. a friend of me and a car of him)? I thought maybe it is short ...
Daniel's user avatar
  • 57.5k
4 votes
1 answer
1k views

St. John's greatest dinner: how to indicate a possessive of a noun which already ends apostrophe - s [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: If the cricket ground Lord's is a possessive, what if you want to describe something belonging to Lord's? Here's a tricky one that I can't quite figure out the correct ...
dataduck's user avatar
  • 311
14 votes
2 answers
12k views

Why use apostrophe-s to denote possession when using 'of'

Think of the simple phrase "Bill's friend". If you were going to turn this around using the preposition 'of' would you say: A friend of Bill's or A friend of Bill It appears to me that, in the US ...
adj7388's user avatar
  • 1,069
33 votes
4 answers
3k views

Possessive of a word that is already possessive

If the cricket ground Lord's is a possessive, what if you want to describe something belonging to Lord's? Would you say: I was very impressed by Lord's's customer services. It doesn't look right, ...
NimChimpsky's user avatar
28 votes
8 answers
145k views

Why do you say "friend of mine" instead of "friend of me"? [duplicate]

I think friend of mine can be translated to my friend. In that case, doesn't friend of me make more sense? If we translate friend of mine to one of my friends then I guess friend of mine makes sense ...
Brian Kim's user avatar
  • 381