Questions tagged [ditransitivity]

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2answers
112 views

In “You did me wrong”, is “wrong” an adverb or some other part of speech instead?

Consider: You did me wrong. In that sentence, is wrong an adverb or some other part of speech? I don’t understand the syntactic construction being used here.
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2answers
747 views

the money given him by his uncle

The following sentence is taken from pag. 79 of The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language He quickly spent the money given him by his uncle. Is it grammatical? Would it still be so after adding ...
2
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3answers
295 views

Should object phrases usually only be in the beginning or end of a sentence in English?

I was talking with a friend about an event tomorrow, and I wanted to tell him I'd text him tomorrow after the event and let him know what happened. I said, "I'll text you tomorrow what happens." I ...
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1answer
7k views

“Provide us with X” or “provide us X”? [closed]

Does provide need the preposition with, or is it truly ditransitive? Kindly provide us with your best quotation Kindly provide us your best quotation. He provided directions. He provided ...
1
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1answer
101 views

Can the verb 'last' ever be ditransitive?

(1) That car should last you for ten years. (2) That car should last you ten years. I think these two mean the same thing. In (1), the verb 'last' is clearly monotransitive. How about the ...
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0answers
973 views

Direct and indirect object with “give” and “buy”

I have been studying Longman's English grammar book, and something is really confusing me: We can put it and them after the verb: Give it to me. Buy them for me. Do it for me. With e.g. give and buy, ...
1
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1answer
286 views

Is it a prepositional or a ditransitive phrase? [closed]

Prepositional phrase? I resolved not to allow frivolous preoccupations to deflect me. (I cause, not to receive frivolous preoccupations to deflect me) It had, after all, brought home to me (the ...
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2answers
62 views

Do I need a “with” in the following sentence?

Usually, I know the answer. But the following sentence confuses me: Was he the man she had shared her flesh and feelings (with) for four years? Is the with necessary? Why or why not?
2
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2answers
96 views

Using “to start” as a ditransitive verb

In the Song I Started a Joke by The Bee Gees (I recommend watching this cover – it's amazing), the lyrics contain phrases like […] which started the whole world crying […] This seems to be non-...
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3answers
195 views

Can the verb “gain” take two complements?

Is it correct to say: The prudent guidance and innovation gained Jane and John much fame. I think that this sentence is grammatically incorrect because the verb gain cannot take two complements ...
1
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1answer
46 views

Grammaticality: 'gift … will not be denied him' (1786 UK)

Source: p 174, The Catholic Christian Instructed in the Sacraments ..., by Richard Challoner, 1786 A. Continency is not required of all, but such as have by vow engaged to keep it: and ...
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1answer
396 views

Does “send” require a “to”? [duplicate]

Is the following grammatical? Should I send the letter to her? If it is, then how come that send can also be used without to? Should I send her the letter? What about the use of send in a ...
3
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3answers
7k views

Is saying “Let me show you it” totally wrong?

My kids (8-10yrs) love to say things like this. It just rolls naturally out and I correct them often. Is there is a specific reason the grammar is wrong? Maybe for the brain it is more direct than ...
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3answers
6k views

“I gave him + INDIRECT OBJECT” vs. “I gave + INDIRECT OBJECT+ to him”

Consider these two sentences: "I gave him a pencil," and, "I gave a pencil to him." Is it correct that the important part of the sentence is placed at the end? When we want to emphasize the pencil ...