Skip to main content

Questions tagged [differences]

This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words. For us to be able to help you, please provide the sourced definitions that you are referring to, where the confusion arises, as well as an example sentence that shows the ambiguity.

157 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
3 votes
0 answers
90 views

What is the difference between phrases "is used when" and "is used for when"?

I was recently reading some articles about type conditionals, and one of them had a following line: The zero conditional is used for when the time being referred to is now or always and the situation ...
whatserface's user avatar
3 votes
5 answers
1k views

"Watch" vs. "Watch as"

He watched them run. He watched as they ran. What's the exact difference, in terms of the information/scene conveyed? He was watching the runners in both cases. Do they have different connotations? ...
xyz's user avatar
  • 41
3 votes
1 answer
3k views

What is the difference between span and period in the context of time?

span the period of time that sometimes exists or happens period a length of time That said, I still don't see the difference. I have the following exercise in my schoolbook: The course would have ...
Alister's user avatar
  • 769
2 votes
0 answers
91 views

What is the difference between fascistic and fascist

I've seen these words both used but not interchangeably. My guess is that fascistic refers to 'fascist in nature', e.g if a building is fascistic it is reflective of fascist ideology but not ...
Guest's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes
0 answers
786 views

Architectural firm vs. architecture studio

I regularly translate Hungarian articles into English, and an expression that keeps coming up is architectural firm. Now, these companies in Hungarian are called studios, thus some of my colleagues ...
meghatas's user avatar
  • 367
2 votes
0 answers
984 views

Can "for" and “due to” be used interchangeably?

Trying to understand the logic of the below sentence to make the same kind of sentences. It's pretty hard for me because I mostly use "for" something like "for me" etc. This city ...
ziLk's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes
0 answers
2k views

Why is “remove to” no longer used?

By Googling, the difference between remove and move can be found as follows: As verbs the difference between remove and move is that remove is to move something from one place to another, especially ...
wordsalad's user avatar
  • 415
2 votes
0 answers
6k views

over the years/thoughout the years/for years

What are the cases in which each of those is used? Can you give more detailed examples and differences in meaning and usage than the ones I found below if there are any? Here's what Google says: ...
dee's user avatar
  • 616
2 votes
0 answers
66 views

Type of clause question ?

No matter what they say about him, it's false. introductory phrase followed by comma and it's false. So is the whole sentence acting as the main clause in these constructions ? It's false can't ...
bluebell1's user avatar
  • 305
2 votes
0 answers
60 views

Earn rewards for participating vs Earn rewards by participating

Is it correct to say: You can earn rewards for participating in the company's wellness program. I'm inclined to change it to You can earn rewards by participating in the company's wellness ...
Allison Valencia's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
106 views

After verbs, how does 'from' compare with 'of'?

(TL;DR) 1. I've been plagued by the postverbal use of the preposition 'of'. After verbs, when describing attributes like origin or source, what are the differences between 'from' and 'of'? The verbs ...
user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
3k views

What are the difference between knelt and kneeled?

kneeled (Dictionary.com): to go down or rest on the knees or a knee. knelt (Dictionary.com): a simple past tense and past participle of kneel.
XPMai's user avatar
  • 341
2 votes
1 answer
858 views

What is the difference between "even if" and "given that" in this context?

I am doing a CAE, Use of English, Part 1 (Multiple choice) exercise and I came across the following paragraph: As nomadic peoples in Asia are known to have been playing the game over two thousand ...
Alister's user avatar
  • 769
2 votes
1 answer
135 views

Does an inverted protasis mean just plain “if”, or does it mean “even if”?

When the first part of a conditional’s if-clause is inverted and the if consequently dropped, is the missing if just a plain old “simple if”, or is it more of an “even if”? For example, in this ...
anotherworld's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
59 views

Is it true that every argument is a complement but not every complement is an argument?

The textbook "The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language", page 226: Argumenthood In the simplest cases the propositional meaning of a clause (ignoring the component contributed by the ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 742
1 vote
0 answers
49 views

Difference between "they thought that the general would lead them to victory" and "they thought that the general would have led them to victory"?

They thought that the general would lead them to victory. vs. They thought that the general would have led them to victory. Is there a difference between the two sentences above? Is one ...
Quasimodo's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
67 views

Difference between “my feet” and “my two feet”

I'm trying to translate the following Prophetic tradition from Arabic to English: ألا كل شيء من أمر الجاهلية موضوع تحت قَدَمَيَّ، وربا الجاهلية موضوع كله، وأول ربا أضع ربا العباس بن عبد المطلب. A ...
Khalid Hussain's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
153 views

Are the expressions "to put it mildly" and "to say the least" always interchangeable?

As we know, the expressions "to put it mildly" and "to say the least" are used to avoid describing something in the strongest way possible. But I wonder if there is a subtle ...
BeatsMe's user avatar
  • 1,478
1 vote
0 answers
4k views

What's the difference between astonishing and astounding?

They both seem very similar to me, too similar to make a distinction. astonishing Something that is astonishing is very surprising Collins Dictionary very surprising Macmillan Dictionary ​very ...
desbest's user avatar
  • 706
1 vote
0 answers
180 views

"Taiwan" as an adjective versus "Taiwanese"

I hope this question is not too simplistic for the "linguists ..." forum, but I couldn’t seem to find an answer elsewhere. I am helping a non-native speaker proofread his Ph.D. dissertation ...
lousifei's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
73 views

Correct usage between two word conceive and pregnant

I am confused about the 2 terms used to say that a lady is bearing a life/child in her womb, they are as follows:- To conceive a child. Getting pregnant. Are they used differently with time like if ...
DEEPESH RAI's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
38 views

Difference between 'lattice' and ''diagram'

I would like to know the difference between 'lattice' and 'diagram' in mathematics context.
Edy19's user avatar
  • 19
1 vote
0 answers
54 views

Word-choice when modifying preceding nouns, among past participle, "which", and "as"

Please see the following phrases. (i) "the language used in" (ii) "the language which is used in" (iii) "the language as used in" (iv) "the language as it is used in" I understand that a past ...
Seapineapple's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
97 views

health experts foresee/predict the novel coronavirus spreading in the U.S

One of the top officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned Americans on Tuesday that health experts foresee the novel coronavirus that has killed thousands spreading in the ...
listeneva's user avatar
  • 1,447
1 vote
0 answers
126 views

What is the difference between _chagrin_ and _dismay_?

When would both be appropriate and when would only one be appropriate? How much do they overlap?
Jun-Dai Bates-Kobashigawa's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
342 views

Difference and usage of "contains exclusively" vs "exclusively contains"

Since the late 1800s, the phrase "contains exclusively" has been consistently used more often than "exclusively contains". Ngram viewer: "contains exclusively" vs "exclusively contains". What is the ...
Daze's user avatar
  • 161
1 vote
0 answers
81 views

Book or App to learn subtle differences between synomyms

I've been working on my English vocabulary for about 16 months now. I feel like I'm at a point at which I sometimes know different ways to express something I have in mind, but I struggle to choose ...
Big_Boulard's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
160 views

Why is the adjective "below" rare compared to adjective "above"?

Above and below can be used as both an adverb and an adjective to indicate an earlier or a later part of a piece of writing respectively. However, adjective below is rare compared to adjective above (...
ermanen's user avatar
  • 63.4k
1 vote
0 answers
709 views

'I disagree that either of these options is correct'

I thought that I mastered the usage of "either" (and neither)...only to be unsure about the following sentence (which I heard, not that it was me who said it): I disagree that either of these ...
John V's user avatar
  • 835
1 vote
0 answers
45 views

Using a verb like 'to finish' with different nouns

Here is an example: I finished lunch. I finished shower. Why is 2 incorrect? What is the difference between these two nouns that makes the grammar different?
danm's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
0 answers
225 views

Is 'a ... lot' derogatory?

From this question, here is a quote from The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist by Conan Doyle, published in 1903: The landlord further informed me that there are usually week-end visitors—‘a warm ...
marcellothearcane's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
84 views

Constructions "be but one" vs "but + pronoun"

I've seen these constructions several times and I've found the following definitions (correct or confirm the definitions): but + noun/pronoun = except She gave the presents to everyone but me = She ...
ar.thewaterfall's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
1k views

'Downwards' versus 'Downward'

I was memorizing a specific sentence in a passage about photography, and I accidentally made a mistake of memorizing 'downward' as 'downwards'. I'm a non-native English speaker so I'm not quite ...
user324391's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
2k views

I've had vs I've been having (+ I've been vs I've)

What's the difference in meaning between the following 2 sentences: I've had a lot of problems this year I've been having a lot of problems this year. Second example: I've been waiting for an hour ...
Milo's user avatar
  • 73
1 vote
0 answers
75 views

A comparison in two sets of quantifiers and adjectives

I learn almost every word on my own, in my productive if a bit peculiar way. I inevitably get perplexed by the ambiguity and the interchangeabilty between the words that I discover with more details. ...
Kismet's user avatar
  • 39
1 vote
0 answers
259 views

What is the difference between a nonessential and essential clause?

According to this, adding a specific noun to a sentence can make a clause nonessential. Example - Freddie hopes to return to the city where he met a woman with haunting green eyes. vs. Freddie ...
WaflR4's user avatar
  • 19
1 vote
0 answers
95 views

singular adjective versus plural possessive

Dynamics which are typical of (or can be found in) news websites or the life which is typical of schools may thoeretically be described by either possessive constructs such as schools' life or news ...
stultissimus's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
1k views

exhibition v.s. inhibition

In my experience... Inhibition is commonly used in different ways, say to render difficult, or to hide, to restrict or hinder, etc. Exhibition can be something like making and art show, presentations,...
Joe DF's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
0 answers
649 views

What is the difference between scourge and bane?

I've picked up this word 'scourge' from Jerome K. Jerome's book "Three men in the boat" and when I actually used it with a native-speaker (Australian) she wouldn't understand it asking me ...
Nemoden's user avatar
  • 557
1 vote
0 answers
1k views

What is the difference between "the ban on" and "the ban of"?

What is the difference between on and of here: the ban on door-to-door sales the ban of door-to-door sales?
Jean C Blais's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
682 views

Being vs Getting in passive voice sentences

Are being and getting interchangeable in passive voice sentences? Here we can see that the people have pretty much concluded they are, indeed. However, my schoolbook suggests only being as the ...
Alister's user avatar
  • 769
1 vote
0 answers
58 views

Is it more grammatically correct to use five-point star or five-pointed star?

Possibly this is a contextual situation - I've seen it both ways, and if there are any rules regarding this I'd like to know them.
Art Colaianni's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
252 views

What is difference between 'Before' and 'Until' when they appears in the beginning of sentence?

Is there any difference between 'until' and 'before'? Eg: Before we have xxx, we can only do yyy... Until we have xxx, we can only do yyy...
Gstestso's user avatar
  • 135
1 vote
0 answers
5k views

What's the difference between 'in the year' and 'of the year'?

the coldest month of the year the coldest month in the year To my ears 'the coldest month of the year' sounds more natural than 'the coldest month in the year'. Is there a difference in meaning and/...
Vee M.'s user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
0 answers
17k views

Tables have turned or Tables are turned?

I often get confused while using this idiom. Can anyone give the use case for each of them? Or is that only one phrase is correct among them and the other one is wrong?
Amit Chigadani's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
109 views

simple present tense

Noob question: I've been following a youtube channel called "Jerry rig everything" for a while now. I'm little confused as to why it's not "Jerry rigs everything" since jerry is his name and I think ...
Kishan Vyas's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
1k views

bananas (are vs is) a whole different story?

Imagine I'm talking to someone about a certain thing and then that person compares bananas to it, I don't think the comparison is valid, so I say "no, bananas are a whole different story", is it ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
647 views

'Sparsely' vs 'Thinly'

What is the difference between sparsely and thinly? Can these words be interchangeable? May I use thinly furnished or thinly populated as well as sparsely furnished and thinly populated.
Georgiy Isaev's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
116 views

'Painted' or 'painting' after 'want' + NP

Which is correct? Is it, "Do you want your house painting" or "Do you want your house painted"? Examples of both can be found on the internet. Is there a difference between them? ...
michael's user avatar
  • 27
1 vote
1 answer
4k views

Difference between "report" and "report on"

1 : to give information about (something) in a newspaper or on television or radio [+ object] Their job is to report the news accurately and fairly. [no object]— often + on He ...
luxury20041985's user avatar