Questions tagged [dialects]

This tag is for questions related to mutually intelligible variations within a language.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
36
votes
5answers
2k views

Regional dialect or just improper grammar? Eating on leftovers or just eating leftovers

On several occasions I have heard white people from the deep south part of the United States (Louisiana to Georgia) say that they will be eating ON leftovers, instead of just eating leftovers. For ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

The phrase: "Find out more information about it at . . . "

I hear this on local radio in northwestern Pennsylvania. "You can find out more information about it at ..." This grates on me a bit. I expect "Find out more at . . . " or "Find more information ...
1
vote
1answer
293 views

What English dialect adds an 'r' after a 'w' in certain cases? [duplicate]

While watching videos online I've heard multiple brits pronounce "drawing" as "drawring". What dialect does that? Please contribute more examples of this as well, as that is the only one I can ...
1
vote
0answers
109 views

How do you say "to brown-bag it" in your neck of the woods?

Is the North American phrase "to brown-bag it"--which means to take a packed lunch to work, school, etc.--used or at least readily understood in the UK and other English-speaking countries? How would ...
2
votes
0answers
711 views

"Cash me ousside" girl's speech

Danielle Bregoli, a.k.a. the "Cash me ousside" girl, became a meme after she appeared on the Dr. Phil Show. (See also: http://www.tmz.com/person/cash-me-outside-girl/) Is Bregoli's speech an affected ...
5
votes
1answer
970 views

What do Americans call a "lie-in"?

The Random House dictionary gives the main definition of "lie-in" as: a protest demonstration in which participants lie down in a public place against regulations and resist being moved. The ...
0
votes
2answers
109 views

there's no more you? [closed]

I'm reading the lyrics of the song So Sick, and I'm puzzled about the following line: Gotta fix that calendar I have that's marked July 15th because since there's no more you. There's no more ...
2
votes
0answers
65 views

All I'm askin' / Is about the interesting preposition placement in the song "Respect"

The Aretha Franklin song "Respect" has the interesting lyric "All I'm askin' / Is for a little respect" [link] where in everyday English, I would expect "All I'm askin' for / Is a little respect". I'...
20
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the origin of "six" as a word to refer to the toilet?

A common euphemism for the toilet in the spoken Welsh of north Wales is "lle chwech", literally "six place" ("chwech" being "six" in Welsh). Note this refers mainly to the room rather than the ...
0
votes
1answer
827 views

Absence of hard "t" [duplicate]

What dialect is this: omitting a hard "t" in a word such as button. Sounds like they're saying buh en.
1
vote
1answer
149 views

Is Simplified Technical English based on American English or British English?

Simplified Technical English was originally developed for use in aviation maintenance manuals, but has expanded beyond this use into a variety of technical fields. It is a "separate" controlled ...
0
votes
1answer
368 views

Is the English spoken in the Cook Islands similar to New Zealand English?

I saw a Cook Islands tourism ad, and the English spoken there seemed very similar to New Zealand English. For example, the accent, and the use of "bro". (The sense of humour is also very similar to ...
1
vote
1answer
311 views

use of "any more"

It's a regionalism to use "any more" to mean "nowadays." It's supposed to be used in a negative sentence, e.g. "Nobody wears sneakers any more." But there are parts of the country where people will ...
1
vote
0answers
97 views

Where does "Do you want the bill grabbing?" come from?

I heard this phrase at a restaurant the other day - in Sheffield, England. The waitress said first, "Do you want anything else getting?", and then after that, "Do you want the bill grabbing?" This ...
14
votes
3answers
295 views

Are there dialects where "would have" is used to describe a factual event long in the past?

I've recently noticed that a few people I know, all native American English speakers in their 50s-70s and originally from the Midwest, use "would have" and related forms when talking about factual ...
21
votes
5answers
13k views

Is “I’ve boughten many vinyls” correct in its use of “boughten”?

Per Merriam-Webster (https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/is-boughten-a-word) boughten is an adjective. According to my non-native-English-speaking friend the sentence "I've boughten ...
1
vote
3answers
562 views

Is"peanut" is pronounced as "pienut" in Australian English?

This morning on NHK Japanese National TV there was a short feature on an Australian person who is running an English school, teaching language and cooking at the same time. As a part of the scenario ...
2
votes
1answer
466 views

Has “if I was” be­come gram­mat­i­cally cor­rect in a south­ern US di­alect? [duplicate]

Liv­ing my whole life in Arkansas in the United States, I’m cer­tain that if I were is never used by lo­cals. In­stead, phrases like if I was and you was and they was have all re­placed their equiv­a­...
14
votes
3answers
4k views

Is there a name for the Southern verb form "done" + past tense?

Do linguists have a name for phrases like "he done did it"? What is known about the origins of such conjugations?
5
votes
1answer
2k views

What's the semantic content of the word "yo" in the speech of Jesse from Breaking Bad, and in which dialects is this construct found in the real world

So I've been watching breaking bad. A really interesting dialectical feature of the character Jesse, is his use of the word "yo". At first I thought nothing of it, it's just "slang&...
2
votes
5answers
4k views

Are there variants of "hold my beer" in different English dialects?

The phrase "Hold my beer/drink (and watch this)" is a rather perjorative bit of slang - it implies that the speaker can perform the same act (or stunt) that he just observed someone else perform, ...
4
votes
3answers
5k views

When did the British and the Americans start to pronounce "o" (as in "God") differently?

When did the British and the Americans start to pronounce "o" (as in "God") differently? Was it due to changes in America or England?
5
votes
1answer
761 views

Origin of pronunciation of "er" as "oi"

What is the provenance of this dialect, e.g. "coitainly" instead of "certainly," as often seen in old cartoons and Three Stooges films?
1
vote
1answer
10k views

What's the distinctions of "starter", "appetizer", and "entree" when expressing a small dish that you eat at the beginning of a meal? [closed]

As a foreign English learner, I always curious about the distinctions of quantity when expressing a small dish that you eat at the beginning of a meal. http://www.differencebetween.com/difference-...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Is Waltzing Matilda comprehensible outside of Australia? In Australia?

I'm American, but it seems to me that when I’ve encountered Australian speech or writing, I didn’t have much trouble understanding it. The words are mostly familiar to me. So what’s going on in the ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Are there different pronunciations of 'cucumber'?

I think the word cucumber is pronounced as if you would say 'car' without the 'r' and then 'cumber'. However, many people I know say it in a way that sounds like 'queue' and then 'cumber'. Are ...
1
vote
1answer
295 views

What is the difference between English besides English (UK) and English (US)? [closed]

If you go to some sites, or to region settings in say Windows, you get many choices of English, I know the difference of spelling between English (UK) and English (US). But what of English (France), ...
1
vote
1answer
277 views

Do speakers using [ɪu] instead of /juː/ use “an” as the indefinite article before this?

There are quite some dialects that use vowel-beginning diphthongs like [ɪu] for what is /juː/ in the Received Pronunciation and General American dialects. Do speakers of these dialects (tend to/want ...
4
votes
1answer
152 views

Are there any "nidgets" out there still?

While researching something unrelated I found this entry on Etymonline: an idiot sometimes became a nidiot, which, with still-common casual pronunciation, became nidget, which, alas, has not ...
-4
votes
1answer
137 views

Usage of "better" and "than" in: "I like the Christmas tree better than her" [closed]

What is wrong with the following sentence? I like the Christmas tree better than her. When I said it I wanted to emphasize that I don't like her and that I think the Christmas tree is better than ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Please? Please! What does the word "please" do?

Please is weirder than a 3 dollar bill! Does please make any statement a question? Is it polite? "TAKE OUT THE TRASH" vs. "Take out the trash, please" is one an option? My son always says when ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Why does "-ing" go to "-in" in some dialects?

In some English dialects "-ing" is replaced by "-in" (e.g., "taking" to "talkin'"). "ng" ([ŋ]), the velar nasal consonant, is done at the back of the mouth, but "n" ([n]), the alveolar nasal ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

What does the word stror mean?

I was reading the book The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells when I came across the word, stror. I can't find it in the dictionary. I want to know what it means. The original sentence is :- "This stror, ...
15
votes
1answer
936 views

What language is this OED entry in?

I came across this citation in the OED entry1 for fag (4th meaning, "a knot in cloth"): 1464 Act. 4 Edw. IV, c. i, ― En cas que ascune autiel diversite ou Rawe, Skawe, cokell ou fagge, aveigne ...
1
vote
1answer
496 views

Any definitions of the word "ask" as an adjective, possibly dialect and possibly meaning astringent? [closed]

Title says it all probably. Does anyone have any recollections of this usage? Any definitions of the word "ask" as an adjective, possibly dialect and possibly meaning astringent?
1
vote
1answer
870 views

Is the phrase "great pickup" a regional (Australian?) thing?

I am someone who grew up in Canada, and been mostly exposed to Canadian, American, and British English. When speaking with some Australians, I've been noticing the use of the phrase "great pickup", ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Origin of "I seen" construct?

I live in western Pennsylvania, US, and over the years I've heard quite a few natives use "I seen" instead of "I saw" or "I have seen", as in: I seen that movie. I seen him leave. I haven't ...
3
votes
1answer
162 views

Are there any English dialects that fully distinguish singular and plural second-person pronoun?

I know that "y'all" and "you all" are common in many English dialects and are often used as pronouns. Are there any dialects in which the number marking of the second person pronoun has become ...
4
votes
1answer
16k views

Why is Hugh called 'Shuggy' in Scottish?

Different english-speaking cultures have different conventions for names. In Australia - your name is shortened or lengthened as a term of endearment. Rose becomes Rosie, Mitchell becomes Mitch and ...
15
votes
5answers
6k views

What is the proper way to say “Clinton”?

I have always assumed that Bill and Hillary Clinton's name is pronounced Clin-tun. But during this year's election coverage, I noticed that a great many people pronounce it as Clin-uhn, with no "T" ...
0
votes
0answers
94 views

to be ended up, to be arrived: regionalism?

I recently saw the phrase "how I been ended up here" in a work of fiction (someone showed me the phrase on a page and I can't remember the title at the moment, but I was told that it was set in 20th ...
2
votes
1answer
143 views

a box of sweets- British / American difference [closed]

I'd like to know what "sweets" means as in "a box of sweets", particularly in American English. Does it necessarily mean "candy"? I'd appreciate your help.
3
votes
2answers
342 views

What American dialects merge pail and pal to /pæl/?

What American dialects merge "pail" (General American /peɪ̯l/) and "pal" (GA /pæl/) into one pronunciation /pæl/? (And likewise "mail", "male", "Mal" as /mæl/, "sale", "sail", "Sal" as /sæl/, etc....
8
votes
2answers
14k views

What caused bell peppers to be called capsicums in some countries?

I have read this answer on the question "Why is the word “pepper” used for both capsicum (e.g. bell pepper) and piper (e.g. black pepper)?", and it contains some useful etymological information. I've ...
0
votes
1answer
175 views

The number of people who do not know an odd number of people, part 2

The answers to the following question have puzzled me: The number of people who do not know an odd number of people I am 100% certain that in whatever version of English I speak, the two sentences ...
3
votes
3answers
33k views

"Who are you?" vs "Who you are?" [closed]

Is there a context in which it is correct/standard to use the expression "Who you are?" as a question? or is "Who are you?" the only possible correct form? Googling "Who you are?" doesn't help ...
2
votes
1answer
426 views

What is it that allows a person to determine that a black person is speaking? [closed]

What allows people to know if a black person is talking, even if they are speaking standard English? They aren't using a separate dialect, nor have an accent, yet it's easy to know if they are black. ...
1
vote
2answers
7k views

Are there different regional pronunciations for "ornery?"

I use a word which I learned from my parents that is pronounced ahn-ree. It's meaning is somewhere between "cheeky" and "rambunctious." My wife asked me how to spell it and I was at a loss. The ...
1
vote
2answers
372 views

In what dialect is "on" used of a programming language?

I have noticed that it is common on StackOverflow for questions to use "on ⟨programming language⟩" where American English would require "in". For example, "Is there a getInt function on ...
3
votes
1answer
916 views

In which regional dialects is "I'm sat" common?

I had always associated the construct I'm sat here (as opposed to I'm sitting here) with the north of England. I know I've heard it from people with Yorkshire or Manchester accents, for example. Yet, ...

1 2 3
4
5
12