Questions tagged [dialects]

This tag is for questions related to mutually intelligible variations within a language.

36 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
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1answer
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Southern Dialect: Word for a time of day?

I remember reading a story somewhere that a Southerner wrote about one of his life experiences. He mentioned that in the region he lived there was a time of day that cooled off a large amount in less ...
3
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0answers
212 views

Are there American English dialects which distinguish /ɑ/ and /ɒ/ but not /ɑ/ and /ɔ/?

I relied on the Logic of English (LoE) phonograms to give myself a better understanding of English pronunciation since the spelling gives me a hard time (even as native speaker), but I noticed that ...
2
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0answers
1k views

Regionality of "scarf" vs "snarf" as in "to scarf down food"

A friend asked in a group chat who uses "scarf" and who uses "snarf". Some of us had only heard one or the other. I was reminded of the American English dialect heat maps (e.g., LINK), and I was ...
2
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0answers
710 views

"Cash me ousside" girl's speech

Danielle Bregoli, a.k.a. the "Cash me ousside" girl, became a meme after she appeared on the Dr. Phil Show. (See also: http://www.tmz.com/person/cash-me-outside-girl/) Is Bregoli's speech an affected ...
2
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0answers
65 views

All I'm askin' / Is about the interesting preposition placement in the song "Respect"

The Aretha Franklin song "Respect" has the interesting lyric "All I'm askin' / Is for a little respect" [link] where in everyday English, I would expect "All I'm askin' for / Is a little respect". I'...
2
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0answers
425 views

Is day-ta more common in the South or the North of the US?

So I've read that dah-ta is more common in the US than in other places, but is day-ta or dah-ta more common to hear in the South? I haven't been able to find that out for sure.
2
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2answers
5k views

Is there a clear preferred usage between *lifespan* and *life span*

I haven't been able to find any clear guidance on this. To me, life span looks wrong, but I have no evidence to support my intuition. A tentative look (webster vs oxford) suggests that perhaps BrE ...
1
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0answers
88 views

How many allophones possible of phoneme /ə/ are there in American English?

I am an ESL student. I want to speak American English fluently. Due to influence of my local dialect in my country, I only discover that there is [ə ɐ ɪə ɑ] doubtably according to my ear, and native ...
1
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1answer
55 views

Dialectal variation in subtleties of usage of the word "sore"

I grew up in southern England, and now live in Scotland. There are many interesting and well-known quirks of usage that differ between Southern English English and the various Scottish dialects and ...
1
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106 views

Do American and British English speakers understand the phrase ''to make a hames of sth''?

This phrase is used in Ireland (Hiberno English). It means to make a mess of something. Interestingly enough, everyone in Ireland knows what this phrase means but very few actually know what a hames ...
1
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0answers
97 views

Can "raise a point" and "make a point" mean the same thing generally?

I personally think "to raise a point" means "to mention some point of interest" while "to make a point" means "to state or demonstrate something of particular ...
1
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0answers
129 views

Why do Christians in American deep south say "whenever" when they mean "when"?

As a midwestern American (Iowa), I want to understand the history, reason, and mechanics of why southern Americans say "whenever" when the word "when" would suffice. For instance: ...
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65 views

Slight GOAT-fronting in GenAm

According to the Wikipedia page, GOAT in GenAm is realized as a slightly fronted [ö̞ʊ]. I have also heard some GenAm(-like) speakers produce that variant, though others produced a completely back ...
1
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0answers
59 views

Are there English dialects that still use the verb "to snithe"?

Wiktionary says that it's used in some dialects in Northern England, but I wonder if that information is still up-to-date. Have you personally heard the verb being used?
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0answers
234 views

How should you pronounce the word "wolf "?

If the dictionary’s IPA for the word wolf is /wʊlf/, then why do I sometimes hear people pronounce it /wolf/ instead of /wʊlf/? Aren’t /ʊ/ and /o/ different phonemes?
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296 views

“We was” and other dialectal variants

According to the British Library site, the use of nonstandard forms of past tense expressions like we was are common in some English dialects The verb 'to be' has two simple past forms in ...
1
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0answers
168 views

Different pronunciations of "-ead"/"-ed"/"-aid" words

I find that American/British English dialects tend to pronounce words like "bed", "red", "dead", "bred", "said", etc. with the exact same vowel sound: the IPA ɛ vowel (- and so this question may seem ...
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0answers
109 views

How do you say "to brown-bag it" in your neck of the woods?

Is the North American phrase "to brown-bag it"--which means to take a packed lunch to work, school, etc.--used or at least readily understood in the UK and other English-speaking countries? How would ...
1
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0answers
97 views

Where does "Do you want the bill grabbing?" come from?

I heard this phrase at a restaurant the other day - in Sheffield, England. The waitress said first, "Do you want anything else getting?", and then after that, "Do you want the bill grabbing?" This ...
1
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0answers
82 views

In which regions of the UK do children "knock on" for their friends?

As someone who has lived most of his life south of a line drawn from The Severn to The Wash - the great linguistic and cultural divide in England - I was not familiar with the expression knocking on. ...
1
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1answer
867 views

Where and/or when is the term "flight ticket" used?

On a forum I frequent some users were complaining about a question using the turn of phrase "flight ticket" as something no English speaker would ever say. I disagreed because it sounds like ...
1
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1answer
3k views

What's the Scottish equivalent of "holy crap!" "oh my God!" "Jesus Christ!", etc?

No swear words, please (sorry). It's for a YA fantasy that takes place on Skye (modern day), and has to be something a teenager might say (again, yeah, I know. Swearing. But surely there's ...
1
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4answers
8k views

What is the difference between "so to do" and "to do so"

I believe that both are correct. I.e. I have got the Christmas Eve off this year but my partner has failed so to do. is equivalent to I have got the Christmas Eve off this year but my partner ...
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34 views

"Why wasn't ya"

In "Wrath of Man", a 2021 movie with Jason Statham as "H", he's being told "what you didn't hear, is that I was meant to be drivin' the truck that day" to which he ...
0
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0answers
61 views

English dialect/accent that switches out the letter "p" with a voiceless bilabial trill (ʙ̥)

Just to clarify the title: not sure if this dialect always switches the "p" out with the "ʙ̥". For example, if the p is in the beginning of word, maybe this doesn't happen. Also, I'...
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0answers
45 views

"She's like a cockroach what turned into a butterfly."

This is a line from Pocketful of Miracles (1961) She's like a cockroach what turned into a butterfly. Apparently in "standard English grammar" this should be She's like a cockroach that/...
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57 views

Any name for this feature of certain dialects where past simple is replaced with past participle?

For the record, I know there is a similar question here that asks about basically the opposite function in some Americam Dialects. I want to know if there is a name for the type of dialectic feature ...
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0answers
237 views

What does the phrase ‘back the road’ mean?

Could someone explain to me the meaning of the phrase ‘back the road’ in the following sentence: “My father still lives back the road past the weir in the cottage I was reared in”? Does it mean ‘next ...
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44 views

"I'm Marsh Turner called."

From the movie Cross Creek, set in 1920s' Florida. Marsh: I'm Marsh Turner called. This is my daughter Ellie. The syntax of this line (as opposed to the standard "I am called Marsh Turner") ...
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0answers
56 views

'I about to died' --- Southern vernacular?

I wonder if anyone here has ever heard this phrase, about to + past tense --- probably a dialectal variant of about + past tense. Is this America's Southern vernacular? And then the judge turned to ...
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0answers
1k views

How much later?

Growing up in the 1980s in New York City, I understood a plain "later" to mean "later in the same day", as in the examples below. As an adult, I lived in St. Louis, met people from many more places, ...
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94 views

to be ended up, to be arrived: regionalism?

I recently saw the phrase "how I been ended up here" in a work of fiction (someone showed me the phrase on a page and I can't remember the title at the moment, but I was told that it was set in 20th ...
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0answers
111 views

Is the 'au' phoneme on the decline?

I live in the midwest, grew up in Chicago. Here, altho there is usually a clear distinction between au like in 'auditorium' and o like in 'on', the 2 are often used interchangeably in ordinary ...
0
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1answer
88 views

What is it called when some pronounces their “t” sharply

What is it called when people pronounce their "t" sounds so sharply that it sounds like the sound "eh" comes after the "t" sound? So the "t" sound sounds like "teh" with a big emphasis on the "eh" ...
-1
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2answers
517 views

Why do we put subject and auxiliary verbs at the end of the sentence?

Why do we put subject and auxiliary verbs e.g., have, be, do at the end of the sentence? I found this kind of sentences from a fantasy book named The last apprentice by Joseph Delany. Examples: ...
-1
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1answer
89 views

Is "one in the same" only a bad transcription of "one and the same"?

Trump suggested the lack of communication was justified because European countries don't inform him when they raise taxes on the US. "When they raise taxes on us, they don't consult us and I think ...