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Questions tagged [dialectal]

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4 votes
2 answers
140 views

Meaning, origin, and usage of 'mitch' to mean lucky/unlikely

Wuthering Heights' Joseph is, in my opinion, one of the more annoying characters in the book, because of a) his temperament, and b) the opaque transcriptions of his thick Yorkshire accent and ...
Heartspring's user avatar
  • 8,610
3 votes
2 answers
280 views

When and where did 'irregardless' first emerge in print, how did it spread, and to what extent was it viewed as a dialectal word?

Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) has the following entry for irregardless: irregardless adv {prob[ably a] blend of irrespective and regardless} ca. 1912) nonstand[ard] : ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
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9 votes
3 answers
1k views

Meaning of “a dizzard”

I’m working on translation of an American novel, dating back to the late 19th - early 20th centuries, and the main character came from a local little Vermont town. The author describes him as “old ...
Alex V's user avatar
  • 91
2 votes
1 answer
87 views

Do people "make parties" in New York?

They made a party for you. Sounds plain wrong to my ears. People don't "make a party" unless their intended meaning is that they attend it, much as "I made the train this morning." However, I lighted ...
Eddie Kal's user avatar
  • 1,162
5 votes
1 answer
205 views

one or [the] other in American and British English

I'm wondering whether the definite article should be placed before "other" in the following sentence, and whether there is dialectal variation in this regard: You should ask one or [the] other of ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 1,879
8 votes
2 answers
693 views

"the 'first/last' of the [day/night/week, etc.]" for "the 'beginning/end' of the [day/night/week, etc.]

Where in the U.S. and Canada do they say, at the first/last of [the day/night/week, etc.] for at the beginning/end of [the day/night/week, etc.]? Luck had it that they only experienced a very minor ...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k
3 votes
1 answer
665 views

"vastly" for "to a [very] great degree; extremely" in contexts not involving comparison or measurement: BrEng vs. AmEng usage

Does using vastly to mean to a [very] great degree; extremely in contexts not involving measurement or comparison, now sound common and idiomatic to British ears, or is it still likely to be ...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k
0 votes
0 answers
462 views

"varietal" vs. "various" vs. "varied"

Please, consider the following sourced excerpts: An ideal romantic daytime date might be to pack a blanket and take your lady to Old Town Silverdale. Settled in 1854, this beautiful little town ...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k
1 vote
1 answer
4k views

"Invite someone [over] to dinner" vs. "... for dinner"

What's the difference between "invite someone [over] to dinner" and "invite someone [over] for dinner"? Please, consider as an example: Thank you for inviting me [over] to dinner. Thank you ...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k
2 votes
1 answer
5k views

Is "put someone on/over to" for "put someone through/connect someone to" idiomatic?

Where in the English speaking world do they say, "put someone on/over [to]" for "put someone through/connect someone [to]" as in: If you'd like to speak direct to one of our ...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k
1 vote
2 answers
397 views

temporal "directly" in AmEng usage: "immediately/without delay" or "shortly/in a little while"?

What does directly commonly mean in standard AmEng when used as a temporal adverb, immediately/instantly/at once/right away/without delay -or- soon/shortly/in a little while? DIRECTLY At once; ...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k
6 votes
3 answers
1k views

"conclude" vs. "decide" in AmEng

Can, in some instances, conclude and decide be used just about interchangeably as far as AmEng goes? Please, consider the following examples: The committee concluded on a plan of action. The ...
Elian's user avatar
  • 43k