Questions tagged [dialectal]

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2
votes
1answer
55 views

Do people “make parties” in New York?

They made a party for you. Sounds plain wrong to my ears. People don't "make a party" unless their intended meaning is that they attend it, much as "I made the train this morning." However, I lighted ...
3
votes
1answer
87 views

one or [the] other in American and British English

I'm wondering whether the definite article should be placed before "other" in the following sentence, and whether there is dialectal variation in this regard: You should ask one or [the] other of ...
8
votes
2answers
621 views

“the 'first/last' of the [day/night/week, etc.]” for "the 'beginning/end' of the [day/night/week, etc.]

Where in the U.S. and Canada do they say, at the first/last of [the day/night/week, etc.] for at the beginning/end of [the day/night/week, etc.]? Luck had it that they only experienced a very minor ...
3
votes
1answer
494 views

“vastly” for “to a [very] great degree; extremely” in contexts not involving comparison or measurement: BrEng vs. AmEng usage

Does using vastly to mean to a [very] great degree; extremely in contexts not involving measurement or comparison, now sound common and idiomatic to British ears, or is it still likely to be ...
0
votes
0answers
390 views

“varietal” vs. “various” vs. “varied”

Please, consider the following sourced excerpts: An ideal romantic daytime date might be to pack a blanket and take your lady to Old Town Silverdale. Settled in 1854, this beautiful little town ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

“Invite someone [over] to dinner” vs. “… for dinner”

What's the difference between "invite someone [over] to dinner" and "invite someone [over] for dinner"? Please, consider as an example: Thank you for inviting me [over] to dinner. Thank you ...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

Is “put someone on/over to” for “put someone through/connect someone to” idiomatic?

Where in the English speaking world do they say, "put someone on/over [to]" for "put someone through/connect someone [to]" as in: If you'd like to speak direct to one of our ...
1
vote
2answers
347 views

temporal “directly” in AmEng usage: “immediately/without delay” or “shortly/in a little while”?

What does directly commonly mean in standard AmEng when used as a temporal adverb, immediately/instantly/at once/right away/without delay -or- soon/shortly/in a little while? DIRECTLY At once; ...
6
votes
3answers
905 views

“conclude” vs. “decide” in AmEng

Can, in some instances, conclude and decide be used just about interchangeably as far as AmEng goes? Please, consider the following examples: The committee concluded on a plan of action. The ...