Questions tagged [dialectal]

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2 votes
1 answer
65 views

Do people "make parties" in New York?

They made a party for you. Sounds plain wrong to my ears. People don't "make a party" unless their intended meaning is that they attend it, much as "I made the train this morning." However, I lighted ...
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5 votes
1 answer
177 views

one or [the] other in American and British English

I'm wondering whether the definite article should be placed before "other" in the following sentence, and whether there is dialectal variation in this regard: You should ask one or [the] other of ...
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8 votes
2 answers
663 views

"the 'first/last' of the [day/night/week, etc.]" for "the 'beginning/end' of the [day/night/week, etc.]

Where in the U.S. and Canada do they say, at the first/last of [the day/night/week, etc.] for at the beginning/end of [the day/night/week, etc.]? Luck had it that they only experienced a very minor ...
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3 votes
1 answer
571 views

"vastly" for "to a [very] great degree; extremely" in contexts not involving comparison or measurement: BrEng vs. AmEng usage

Does using vastly to mean to a [very] great degree; extremely in contexts not involving measurement or comparison, now sound common and idiomatic to British ears, or is it still likely to be ...
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0 votes
0 answers
416 views

"varietal" vs. "various" vs. "varied"

Please, consider the following sourced excerpts: An ideal romantic daytime date might be to pack a blanket and take your lady to Old Town Silverdale. Settled in 1854, this beautiful little town ...
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1 vote
1 answer
4k views

"Invite someone [over] to dinner" vs. "... for dinner"

What's the difference between "invite someone [over] to dinner" and "invite someone [over] for dinner"? Please, consider as an example: Thank you for inviting me [over] to dinner. Thank you ...
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2 votes
1 answer
5k views

Is "put someone on/over to" for "put someone through/connect someone to" idiomatic?

Where in the English speaking world do they say, "put someone on/over [to]" for "put someone through/connect someone [to]" as in: If you'd like to speak direct to one of our ...
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1 vote
2 answers
378 views

temporal "directly" in AmEng usage: "immediately/without delay" or "shortly/in a little while"?

What does directly commonly mean in standard AmEng when used as a temporal adverb, immediately/instantly/at once/right away/without delay -or- soon/shortly/in a little while? DIRECTLY At once; ...
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6 votes
3 answers
1k views

"conclude" vs. "decide" in AmEng

Can, in some instances, conclude and decide be used just about interchangeably as far as AmEng goes? Please, consider the following examples: The committee concluded on a plan of action. The ...
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