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Questions tagged [diacritics]

Questions regarding glyphs that are added to letters, e.g. the acute accent (´) in résumé or the diaeresis (¨) in naïve.

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1answer
106 views

Diacritics or meaning difference for deja vu

Could be trivial but would like to know, what is the difference between déjà vu and deja vu Is it primarily the pronunciation difference or something else?
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4answers
392 views

“Naïve” yet “naivety”?

I am used to spelling "naïve" thus - "naïve". I am also used to Microsoft Word automatically changing "naive" to "naïve". Hence, I was surprised when it didn't change "naivety" to "naïvety". I then ...
2
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1answer
62 views

pronouncing -ó in poetry [duplicate]

Do you guys know how '-ó' is pronounced? Context: The Windhover, Hopkins.       No wonder of it: shéer plód makes plough down sillion Shine, and blue-bleak embers, ah my dear,       Fall, gall ...
3
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2answers
276 views

How come in English we don't put symbols above our letters to change how they are pronounced? [duplicate]

How come in English we don't put symbols (things) above our letters to change how they are pronounced? In French for example they have an acute accent ( ´ ) and grave ( ` ) and the cedilla that goes ...
0
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1answer
100 views

Using diacritics

I'm trying to figure out how to make the word Faro sound like Pharaoh as in the Egyptian Pharaoh instead of Far-Oh. I'm looking into diacritics right now but they are confusing what I'm understanding ...
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8answers
2k views

Usage of diacritics in loanwords

I was told here that not using diacritics (specifically the cedilla) is bad usage for those who know — I assume — their diacritics. Is that correct? Is garcon a correct spelling, in English, of the ...
7
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1answer
851 views

Did Old English have diacritics?

I was learning English, which is my second language, when I came across the methinks word. I went to google to look up its meaning and usage, when to my surprise I saw this description: Old English ...
3
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0answers
68 views

Should accents be used in French words when used in English? [duplicate]

In essays, or writing in general, is it more acceptable to include or leave out accents in French words (or even natively accented words in general)? For example, would I say The bread was served ...
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0answers
110 views

Was the use of accents in -ed adjectives ever common-place? When were they first used in modern books?

The distinction between the words blessèd (/ˈblɛsəd/) and blessed (/blɛst/) (see Grammarbook) appears to be wearing thin in modern language, possibly due to reduced accent usage and its resultant lack ...
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0answers
572 views

List of characters with diacritics accepted in English words [closed]

Some diacritics and special characters (like ligatures) are accepted in Contemporary English: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_terms_with_diacritical_marks Examples of English spellings: ...
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1answer
235 views

Why are diacritics used in words that apparently don't need them? Is it some sort of poetic license? [duplicate]

In his poem Spring and Fall, Gerard Manley Hopkins uses diacritics where one would normally not see them. Does anyone know why? Here is the poem: Márgarét, áre you gríeving Over Goldengrove ...
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1answer
1k views

Are -èd adjectives still usèd words?

The distinction between the words blessèd (/ˈblɛsəd/) and blessed (/blɛst/) (see Grammarbook) appears to be wearing thin in modern language, possibly due to reduced accent usage and its resultant lack ...
4
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3answers
229 views

Is there an equivalent of diaeresis, but for consonants?

I know that diaeresis is used to show that two adjacent vowels are not a diphthong but should be pronounced separately, as in naïve or Zoë. Is there an equivalent mark or format in current ...
4
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4answers
599 views

“Accentuation signals” in English

Unlike in English speaking countries, here in Brazil it is very common to have names with accents. My own name is an example of it: Túlio. In my case, in letter u we have an accentuation signal ...
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2answers
453 views

How to mark a stressed vowel in a text?

I write an article containing many Russian names and surnames, and sometimes it is important to specify which vowel is stressed (e.g. to distinguish Baskov from Baskov). In Russian we put an accent ...
1
vote
1answer
438 views

English regarding the letter i being pronounced as ee

I don't have an answer but I sure have a question. What diacritic or accent is used when the letter i in a christian name (with no vowel either side of it) is supposed to be pronounced ee?
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1answer
86 views

Is there a word for the letter that a diacritic is applied to?

If I am speaking about a letter that has a diacritical mark (e.g. 'á'), what word or phrase should I use to reference the base letter (e.g. 'a')? I'm looking for something a little more concise than "...
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7answers
2k views

Why does English omit diacritics on foreign names?

Why does English omit diacritics from foreign names that still use the Latin alphabet? For example, why are the Czech tennis player Tomáš Berdych, the Norwegian crime writer Jo Nesbø, or the Polish ...
45
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2answers
7k views

Where does “ö” fall in alphabetical ordering?

Much to my surprise, I just learned that some English-language documents use the ö character. I need to know, when sorting words in an English-language document, where is ö placed? before A? ...
5
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6answers
8k views

How to write Vietnamese names in English correctly? (“Việt Nam” to “Vietnam” or “Viet Nam”?)

Commonly, in writing, the country name in Vietnamese is Việt Nam, in English is Vietnam; its capital city name in Vietnamese is Hà Nội, in English is Hanoi; its largest city name in Vietnamese is ...
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2answers
4k views

Accent Marks in English

Why doesn't the English language have accent marks? I have been trying to understand the critical differences that are present between the English and Spanish language, however I just can not wrap my ...
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2answers
145 views

Using diacritics in new-formed words [duplicate]

There is some historical usage of diacritics in English, like naïve, résumé or even façade. I've been once told that these are used to mark a different spelling, and it may be used like in coöperative ...
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1answer
1k views

Why English does not have diacritics to distinguish between words with different meanings and pronunciations

It just occured to me that there are words in English that have two different meanings, two different pronunciations and are written exactly the same. For example "present" can be interpreted as the ...
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1answer
847 views

How to cite an author who spells his name inconsistently

I am writing a paper where I will cite several works by the Hungarian mathematician Gábor Szegő. Note that his surname includes the letter o with a double acute accent, NOT a letter o with umlaut ö. ...
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2answers
469 views

Usage of macrons in Latin loanwords

I know that diacritics are often retained in loanwords in formal writing (cf. naïveté), but I haven't seen this done with direct adaptation of Latin words; i.e., per se. In Latin, per sē comes with a ...
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1answer
149 views

Term for misused diacritics

Is there a word which describes intentionally misusing or abusing diacritics, in contexts where they are neither needed nor appropriate, for purely stylistic reasons. For example: I submittéd my ...
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0answers
19 views

Writing double voiced vowels [duplicate]

I have a pretty straight forwards question I think. Of the following three spellings, which one is generally accepted as correct (I've seen them all, well, something like it) reemerge re-emerge ...
0
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1answer
2k views

Is the diaeresis legal in “naïve”? [duplicate]

I understand why naïve is spelled with two dots, and that those dots are called a diaeresis. What I do not understand is whether the use of a diaeresis is legal in English; is it? Other than naïve,...
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2answers
255 views

What would Prof. William Strunk Jr. say about writing saute vs. sauté today? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Diacriticals and non-English letters in anglicized loan words: keep 'em, dump 'em, italicize the words, or what? I have no idea what I’m doing. Catch as catch can. “...
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0answers
219 views

What does the umlaut mean over the E in the name “Zoë”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Zoe” or “Zoë”: which is the correct spelling? The ë in the name Zoë suggests that the e should be pronounced as a long a. The name is from the Greek goddess of life and ...
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2answers
6k views

What are the different ways an accent mark can go over the letter A & how are they pronounced? [closed]

I've found specifically these ones: á, à, â, å, ä. I believe they COULD be used in the English language, or root ones such as Celtic & Germanic, but I don't know how they are pronounced. Oh, and ...
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1answer
12k views

What do the letters ï and ô mean? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the distinction between “role” and “rôle” [with a circumflex]? What is the significance of the “ô” character in “rôle” in this work? What is the standard rule ...
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0answers
51 views

What is the proper way to spell résumé? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Should you always use the accent in foreign words like “résumé”? Diacriticals and non-English letters in anglicized loan words: keep 'em, dump 'em, ...
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3answers
38k views

Two dots on the “i” instead of one? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Whereäs” as an alternative spelling of “whereas” Is it spelt “naïve” or “naive”? Someone I talked to used two dots in this word: Naïvely I ...
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6answers
10k views

What is the standard rule for using or not using hyphen and diaeresis on the words like reelect , reexamine, and cooperate?

I found that diaeresis is used on the word, reelection in the following sentence of the article titled “Rational Irrationality” in the New Yorker magazine (April 27). “This morning’s news that ...
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1answer
1k views

How can I call these symbols in English? [closed]

I'm a programmer and I wonder how I can call these symbols in English: ~ | ^ `
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1answer
687 views

Anglicization of diacritical marks and non-English letters

In my understanding, many European cultures have compensated for the lack of certain characters on keyboards (especially old typewriters) by “anglicizing” some characters. For example, the German ß ...
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1answer
3k views

What is the term which encompasses accents, umlauts, etc? [closed]

Is there a term that covers grave and acute accents, umlauts, cedillas, tildes and all other characters that can be added to normal letters. I have come across the word diacritics. But this seems to ...
4
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1answer
764 views

What is the significance of the “ô” character in “rôle” in this work?

In this document from 1916, on the last line of the first page is the word rôle. If context matters, the entire sentence is: As might readily be supposed, the control of the lactic acid ...
1
vote
1answer
244 views

What is the third 'quote' (inverted comma) called? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What are these symbols called? ~ ` ^ Most of use are familiar with " and ' but what is the third ` (same key as ~ on a standard US keyboard) character called, and how or ...
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2answers
2k views

What are these symbols called? ~ ` ^ [closed]

What can I call the following symbols? ~ ` ^
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1answer
213 views

Where to use “!”, “;”, “`” [closed]

Where should I use the following symbols while writing something in English language? ! — exclamation mark ; — semicolon ` — grave accent
6
votes
1answer
438 views

Etymology of charlâtanerie

Can anyone provide me with the etymology and details of usage of the word charlâtanerie ? I came across this word while reading The Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allan Poe.The following passage ...
14
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3answers
10k views

What does the grave accent mark on words mean?

What exactly does the grave accent mean in English? An example from Shakespeare’s Sonnet 30: The sad account of fore-bemoanèd moan
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5answers
551 views

Is spelling still drifting?

If you look at texts from a few hundred years ago, they’re almost illegible, what with all the superfluous e’s and y’s running about, the long-S’s (  ſ  ), and so on. Texts from 100 and 120 years ago ...
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5answers
24k views

Why do some English speakers pronounce “fête” as “fate”?

In French, from whom we’ve borrowed the word, it’s /fɛt/ “fet”. But if we pronounced it as if it were an English word after dropping the accent, it would be /fi:t/ “feet”. Yet the pronunciation we ...
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6answers
116k views

“Zoe” or “Zoë”: which is the correct spelling?

I have a relation who has named their child Zoe, on the grounds that “in English we don’t use the dots”, but they pronounce it like the second version. Of course I don’t want to argue that’s not the ...
6
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6answers
8k views

Are there any pairs of words like “beloved”/“belovèd”, “learned”/“learnèd” that maintain a semantic difference to the present day?

When I first read Romeo and Juliet in high school, I remember being intrigued by pairs of words such as, beloved/belovèd and learned/learnèd where there's an accent grave on the 'e' of the ...
3
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2answers
3k views

Why is “sauté” spelled with an accent and “repartee” not?

Why are these words spelled differently? They have the same sound at the end, right?
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2answers
3k views

Should I write “repartee” with an accent?

Does repartee need an accent with it in writing? Also, what does it mean? Edit: Can you please provide an example sentence or two? I'd really appreciate it!