Questions tagged [descriptive-grammar]

Descriptive grammar is a set of rules about language based on how it is actually used. In descriptive grammar there is no right or wrong language. It can be contrasted with prescriptive grammar, which is a set of rules based on how people, mostly writers of style books and grammar text books, think language should be used. See https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/descriptive-grammar .

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104 views

Using the plural form of proprietary for software

I came across this sentence in an article. There is a balance of proprietary and open sources in the market. Should it be either of the following instead? There is a balance of proprietaries and ...
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1answer
55 views

Meaning of sentence in Frankenstein

In Frankenstein, Chapter 15 I cherished hope, it is true, but it vanished when I beheld my person reflected in water or my shadow in the moonshine, even as that frail image and that inconstant ...
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74 views

In spoken language, if a name is used to substitute the pronoun I, which is the correct verb to use as the first person?

For example I am Aunt Jalene talking to a kid. Instead of saying I try to cook I said Aunt Jalene (I as the first person) tries/try to cook. Should it be try or tries?
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66 views

Transform or Transforms?

Is this sentence grammatically correct? "It can melt away anger and transforms your bad mood into a good mood." I am confused between transform and transforms.
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127 views

Which preposition is correct with “settling”? The complete sentence is given below

This is the complete question which I came across during a competitive exam. Eager to control the South Atlantic, the British Navy had tasked Admiral Byron ________ (with/for) settling an island off ...
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1answer
823 views

Right a wrong & wrong a right [closed]

You can say "right a wrong" & "righting wrongs" But can you say "wrong a right or "wronging rights"
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1answer
407 views

Might be OR Might have been [closed]

The sentence: Had the doctor been more careful, my cousin might still have been alive. In this construction, the two fragments of the sentence are more parallel with their use of been. Had he ...
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4answers
700 views

what does a native speaker say when he wanted to leave his work? [closed]

If someone, who is a medical doctor says that he's leaving his current company, I mean the hospital that he works for, is that something that a native speaker would say? I'm leaving my hospital? What ...
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0answers
24 views

Addressing two cities in the same country

Should I use "In 1347, the port cities of Messina and Genoa, Italy..." or "In 1347, the port cities of Messina, Italy and Genoa, Italy..."? just want to know if one is grammatically incorrect.
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1answer
52 views

Grammar of past events

How is it grammatically correct to say "Did you hear what I just said?"?. Is it also possible to say something as "Did you hear what i say?"?. I mean, that direct following the past simple grammar ...
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1answer
163 views

Conjunctions, coordinators

I really know that for the levels of studying English language, we had always said that "for" is a coordinator. However, I would like to know what for serves in this sentence For God so loved the ...
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2answers
262 views

Explain the difference between the following 2 sentences [closed]

They always eat in front of the TV in the living room. They're always eating in front of the TV in the living room.
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4answers
182 views

Earliest I've been to work

I am supposed to clock in at 8 am every day to work. I was late today, just like every day, but today I was only late by 5 minutes, less than every other time. Is saying "earliest I've been to work" ...
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1answer
37 views

Which is correct work or worked?

Which sentence is correct: It would be a good idea if you work hard. It would be a good idea if you worked hard. Thanks in advance for help
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1answer
37 views

Finites in a conditional sentence

In the sentence below. How many finites are there? 'Interviewers ask respondents if they have been the victim of a crime in the past 12 months; if they have, respondents provide information about ...
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1answer
26 views

I named my company Higher Standard Service, is this proper english? [closed]

So i named my company Higher Standard Service because our company motto is to provide a higher standard "of" service. I want to be sure that by leaving out the "of" in the company name i don not sound ...
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3answers
125 views

Since 'few' is used for countable nouns and 'less' is for uncountable nouns

Since 'few' is used for countable things and 'Less' is for uncountable things then why do we say; I have less than 2 days/months/years. ? Yes, time is an uncountable concept but we sure can count ...
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3answers
419 views

Learning to end sentences with “hence”. Examples?

I dabble in creative writing here and there. Wordsmiths like Tolkien and Lovecraft are a pleasure to read for their sheer skill in sentence structure and plethora of words. I'm now attempting to ...
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1answer
77 views

Avoiding use of double negatives

I teach an ESL Class for Spanish speakers. I've taught them the rules regarding "double negatives". Today, I had them translate the Spanish equivalent of "It isn't that he doesn't understand me." ...
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1answer
381 views

how to attribute a singular property to a plural noun?

Please consider the following examples: The size/sizes of the planets is/are written here. The door/doors of a 100 houses is/are 100Kg. Men's nose/noses is/are bigger than that/those of women. Which ...
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2answers
120 views

Is “The cat paws in the water to get the fish” a grammatically correct sentence? [closed]

Is this sentence, "The cat paws in the water to get the fish" grammatically correct?
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0answers
50 views

How can I describe a conjunction that ends a sentence (so, and, or, but …)?

Recently I (American English speaker / academic / raised in Appalachian and Southern dialect household) noticed myself falling into a conversational pattern with coworkers where I would end a spoken ...
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1answer
32 views

Clarity on the definition of the word “predict” [closed]

When someone says "I look forward to your predictable path" and "please continue down your very tired and predictable path" and "your arguments are right out of a playbook", what's the meaning of '...
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1answer
34 views

Type of usage in these examples? Clauses/fragments

Peter senses his father's danger and tries to reach him, but is forced to watch helplessley as his father is driven away. Her father struggles with complex emotions about the child he raised as his ...
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0answers
131 views

“fresh and relaxed”

I have to identify the syntax used in these two sentences and explain. A. After a short vacation in Japan, Mr Chang appeared in my office, fresh and relaxed. B. After a short vacation in Japan, Mr ...
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2answers
47 views

Degrees of comparison - “is the” vs. “is more”

Can we say "John is the stiffest of Rachel and Mark.", OR "John is more stiffer than Rachel and Mark."? Which one is better?
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2answers
126 views

How do we grammatically describe 'thing'

There's a thing I'd like to ask, it's something you might know. When we say "bring me that thing over there" or "it's with my things", how do we grammatically classify this use of thing in English? ...
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2answers
6k views

Take an umbrella in case it may rain?

Take an umbrella in case it may rain. can anybody tell me why this statement was wrong? and the right one is Take an umbrella in case it rains.
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1answer
74 views

What do you call someone who is ungrateful, only sees things negatively and never acknowledges you

I am a team player and like to contribute. When asked to take on a task. I always say yes and I never get a thank you. He never provides all the details to what he wants and then asks why I didn’t ...
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3answers
90 views

“Some of the [superlative adjective] I've ever been” — another way to phrase this?

I can't seem to find a non-awkward way of expressing this sort of sentiment: suppose you want to tell a friend about some time you were really, really cold, but it wasn't the coldest you've ever been. ...
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1answer
51 views

Is there a term for using “or” to introduce something like an appositive?

Recently someone was trying to explain to me that "or" can have a non-disjunctive function, and this came to mind as a possible example but I can't figure out the terminology to describe it. I know ...
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1answer
97 views

In a world of descriptivist dictionaries, how is linguistic relativism avoided in discussions?

“If you wish to converse with me, define your terms.” —Voltaire During discussions and debates, especially those of a more academic or technical nature, it is important to establish agreed upon ...
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2answers
7k views

We are a group of people who/which/that..?

Which of these three is correct? We are a group of people who meet.. We are a group of people which meets.. We are a group of people that meets.. This is different from the case when "People" is the ...
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1answer
40 views

Defining and Non defining Relative clauses

Is the following sentence a define or not defining relative clause. Since, when we remove the part enclosed in commas, the remaining part doesn't make sense, I think it is a defining relative clause ...
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2answers
244 views

Alternative to “less good at” [closed]

Is there an alternative, yet polite way of saying: "For those less good at English" I know it's technically correct but it doesn't sound right to me. The context is that we are offering a service ...
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3answers
301 views

Pronoun: what does it refer to here?

In the following sentence, what does the pronoun it refer to? A differs from B in that it is.... I read before that a pronoun refers to the closest name (B in that sentence); however, here it ...
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1answer
2k views

He discovered that his father had a special box in the basement

He discovered that his father had a special box in the basement I was told that I should not use "that" in the above sentence although it is grammatically correct to use it. Why I shouldn't use "that"...
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0answers
30 views

parts of speech of a word in a sentence

What is the part of speech of before in the following: Long before anyone coined the term sci-fi? I am wondering whether it is an adjective, an adverb, or a preposition?
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2answers
66 views

Is “Provincial Centre for Public Administration Services” correct phrase?

My little province in Vietnam has just established a center, which is meant to be a central place for all services provided by the local government that the provincial citizens can come and deal with ...
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2answers
4k views

of the highest quality vs high quality

Which sentence makes the most sense: ...produce the most sophisticated tool and of the highest quality to perform the job or ...produce the most sophisticated and high quality tool to perform ...
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1answer
70 views

is “all” implied in a list?

If I have a list that begins with: "Cars He Wants to Buy" Is it implied that that list contains ALL the cars he wants to buy? Or is it implied that it is just some? My thought was that an "all" is ...
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2answers
857 views

Why do we say “eat healthy” instead of “eat healthily”? [duplicate]

Why do we say "eat healthy" instead of "eat healthily", even though the latter is the only "correct" one, according to the comments in "eat healthy" or "eat healthily" What ...
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4answers
336 views

I am looking for a word that can be used to describe a person who can switch bodies with another human

Not to be confused with a person who can morph themselves into someone else or a creature by will, but someone who has an ability to body swap - without necessarily having control over it. I am ...
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2answers
69 views

When describing an action by two persons is it ever correct to name oneself first? [duplicate]

When describing an action by two persons and that action has a negative outcome or nature, is it correct to name oneself first? As in I and he played poorly.
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2answers
963 views

“you is” in place of “you are” [closed]

Recently I listened to this song "You is smart, you is important ..." This is the link for this song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3H50llsHm3k Can I say "you is" in place of "you are"? Thanks ...
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1answer
270 views

Harry Potter grammar question

In the book Harry Potter and The Chamber of Secrets, Chapter 2, page 14, last paragrapgh appears 2 sentences like this, "They lets Dobby get on with it" and "Sometimes they reminds me to do extra ...
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1answer
481 views

Difference between “as” and “like”

Can anyone please tell me what the difference between as and like in the following sentence is. And which one is correct? Here's the example: None of the other students helped the old man across the ...
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1answer
775 views

Multi-colorful or multi-colored? [closed]

Is multi-colorful a word? Or is the correct word multi-colored?
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1answer
6k views

“no one” vs “no one else”

Can anyone please tell me if I should use no one or no one else in the following sentence? Here is the example: John is a very good friend of mine. No one (else) likes me more than he does. I think ...
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1answer
328 views

The usage of “…that one might assume” [closed]

I have a question about the following sentence. In the (A) option, I'm aware that's a classical "as .... as you assume". But my main confusion is that (B) option seems really legit to me ...