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Questions tagged [dependent-clause]

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4
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4answers
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Conjunction Puzzle: Is this clause dependent or independent?

Third grade teacher here. I plan to teach students to distinguish between simple, compound and complex sentences — but only if I can demonstrate a clear and meaningful difference between the latter ...
4
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1answer
410 views

Can “where” ever be used as the subject of a relative/adjective clause?

Here's the sentence that was confusing: He went back to Santa Monica which was his hometown. Why can't "which" be replaced with "where"? "Where" can be used as a relative pronoun, but it's doesn'...
1
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1answer
754 views

What rules govern the omission of the subject in non-finite clauses?

In non-finite clauses the verb must be in a non-finite form (such as an infinitive, participle, gerund or gerundive), and it is consequently much more likely that there will be no subject ...
5
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1answer
590 views

Comma after nonrestrictive adverbial (dependent) clause at the end of the sentence

I am confused whether comma is required after adverbial (dependent) clauses at the end of the sentence (and the difference, if any, between restrictive and non-restrictive adverbial clauses). The ...
1
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1answer
507 views

Use of then as a dependent conjunction [duplicate]

First of all, I understand that then cannot be used as a conjunction with simply a comma (lacking a semicolon or start of new sentence) to connect two independent clauses and that a semicolon or a ...
2
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1answer
2k views

What's this syntax called: “Him being the nice person he is, helped her.”?

Or "He, being the nice person that he is, helped her." Which one is correct and what's the construction called?
-2
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3answers
3k views

WHY should I put comma after a dependent clause?

For example, If you vote, you can have a say. Or you'd also have to put a comma after any other dependent clause beginning a sentence. So we should put a comma after dependent clause—why?