Questions tagged [demonyms]

names of inhabitants or citizens

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1answer
59 views

Does the adjective “Arabian” refer to the people or to the location? [duplicate]

Arab and Arabian are both related to people: He is an Arab. He is an Arabian. Which is used for the location of a country? Egypt is an Arab country. Egypt is an Arabian country.
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118 views

What is the demonym of “Chaco”? [closed]

How can I say the demonym of "Chaco"? In Spanish it is "chaqueño", but I don't know what the correct word is in English.
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1answer
439 views

A citizen of eSwatini

eSwatini (officially the Kingdom of eSwatini) is the new name of Swaziland. What should one call a citizen of eSwatini in English? A citizen of eSwatini is called a[n] _____. I can think of the ...
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Why is it “Rhine”, but “Rhenish”?

Being a native German speaker, I just came across the word "Rhenish" (as a translation of German "rheinisch", belonging to the Rhine). I am a bit confused about this, and am at a loss for the proper "...
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3answers
157 views

How to translate Portuguese demonyms containing gender?

I can say "Brazilian company" (empresa brasileira, in Portuguese) for a company in Brazil. If the company resides in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais, in Portuguese we say "empresa mineira", or for ...
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1answer
59 views

City name without demonym in “Belgrade journal Philosophia”

The apparent peculiarity of the phrase mentioned in the title is that the city name itself is used at the beginning of the phrase instead of its demonym Belgradian. Is there a rule of English grammar ...
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1answer
70 views

Would it be i-Kiribati or I-Kiribati? [closed]

So the demonym of Kiribati is "i-Kiribati". Apart from being cool, what is the correct way of writing this? Would it be a capital "I" all the time? eg. "I'm an I-Kiribati" or would it be a small "i" ...
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2answers
138 views

What does the noun “Hawaiian” really mean in English? [closed]

Headlines this morning (Saturday 1/13/2018) proclaimed that "Hawaiians woke up to emergency alerts" on mobile phones that a missile strike might be incoming. But no local news source here in Hawaii ...
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3answers
507 views

Why is “man” in “Snowman” pronounced differently than in “Frenchman” or “Englishman”?

It seems that in the words Englishman, Frenchman, and Scotsman, the ‑man part is pronounced /mən/ (just like in Roman). Whereas in snowman, the ‑man part is pronounced /mæn/ (just like in no man). ...
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0answers
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Correct use of 'Indian' [closed]

Would it be correct to call someone who is a first generation Indian(of the continent of India) simply as Indian? Or can you only call them an American? Or both? Essentially, is the criteria of being ...
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2answers
888 views

The Greek or the Greeks? [closed]

Why are the people of France collectively the French, the Chinese the Chinese, but the Tibetans, ancient Greeks and the Germans countable plurals? The Jews aren't the Jewish which seems more ...
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3answers
719 views

Is 'Japanese' in 'the Japanese' (people from Japan collectively) a noun or an adjective?

Oxford Dictionaries classify 'Japanese' in 'the Japanese,' meaning people from Japan collectively, as a noun although some people I consulted insist it is an adjective. They base it on the examples '...
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1answer
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Is calling someone who resides in the country of India an “Indian” considered a racist slur? [closed]

This morning as I'm sure we all have, I was called by "Microsoft Tech Support". I wasted a half hour of their time saying I couldn't log in before they hung up. Later I had told my Dad, as he asked ...
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1answer
446 views

What would a “Down Under” citizen be called? [closed]

Today is the 26th of January, it is Australia Day. My question is about its nickname Down Under and derivatives. Q. If you had to, what would you call the citizen of a country called “Down Under”? ...
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1answer
273 views

Equivalent of Spaniard for other nationalities

In English, the term for a person of Spanish descent is (at least traditionally) a Spaniard. Its etymology is, as far as I can tell, pretty unique among modern words: c. 1400, from Old French ...
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1answer
350 views

Austro-Hungarian or Austrian-Hungarian?

While reading on the Austro-Hungarian rule in Bosnia and Herzegovina in Wikipedia: Their goals, however, were no obstacle to economic cooperation with the Austrian-Hungarian authorities [...] ...
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1answer
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History and English demonyms

A friend of mine told me English demonyms, words that identify people from a particular place (Roman, Japanese, Dutch etc.), largely depend upon the historical period in which the term originates. ...
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1answer
948 views

Why is there a V in “Peruvian”?

I wasn't aware of any other demonyms that add a V, except the unofficial Whovian (a fan of Doctor Who). This Wikipedia page turned up a few more more: Barrow-in-Furness → Barrovian Oamaru → ...
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2answers
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What should I call a person from New Zealand?

The question “They are Australian” vs “They are Australians” on English Language Learners made me think of what people from New Zealand should be called. With Australian people it's quite clear, you ...
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3answers
281 views

Demonyms - When a place ends on an “s” sound, why are its inhabitants sometimes spelled with a “t”? (e.g. Mars - Martian)

I am not natively English speaking and I was wondering about this spelling when I saw the title of the movie "The Martian". This pattern also seems to apply to other things ending on an "s" sound, ...
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What do you call someone from the Sun?

Is there a proper word that can be used to refer to someone (some living/sentient entity) that originates from the Sun? I'm guessing "solar" would not be the proper word for this.
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British and Canadian but not Coloradan?

In the May 11 issue of this year's New Yorker, the ever-excellent Atul Gawande wrote (emphasis mine): Among those which caught my eye: a British case report on the first 3-D-printed hip implanted ...
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What's the origin of the demonym Thai?

I was curious why we called people from Thailand "Thai" and those from Taiwan "Taiwanese." The latter by itself is a bit less surprising, though. See also: Are there any rules governing what we call ...
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1answer
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Adjectives that Imply Nouns [closed]

Often we may see adjectives with nouns that are implied, but not explicitly written. I see this mostly with sports team names and demonyms. For example: The Notre Dame Fighting Irish Is "Irish" a ...
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What is the demonym for a citizen of Niger?

If a citizen of Nigeria is a Nigerian, what is a citizen of Niger referred to as? The Wikipedia article on Niger and the online Oxford Learner’s Dictionaries say that the proper term is Nigerien, as ...
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1answer
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United Kingdom's three-name-cities; is there a generic way to write them?

There are city names in the United Kingdom like "Stratford-upon-Avon" or "Newcastle upon Tyne". Then, I wonder: is there any general rule on how they should be written? Case: In general, I see the ...
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1answer
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Are there any universal rules in appropriating “_an,” “_sh,” “_es,” “_ch” for the demonyms of countries? [duplicate]

Suffixes indicating people and language of country vary by country: _an: American, German, Italian, Belgian, Australian, Russian, Ukrainian, Korean, Mexican, Brazilian, Chilean, Argentinean, ...
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Why can we say 'an American' but not 'a British'?

I am confused with the use of an indefinite article in front of British or Chinese. To my understanding, we can place an indefinite article in front of any “countable noun”. So, we can say a cup and ...
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1answer
202 views

Adjective of proper noun containing “and”

A person from The Turks and Caicus Islands is known as what? Likewise with Trinidad and Tobago, St Kitts and Nevis, São Tomé and Principé, and Bosnia and Herzegovina. http://www.un.org/en/members/ I'...
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Does one capitalize “Portuguese” when used in a hyphenated adjective? [closed]

When Portuguese is used as part of a hyphenated adjective, does it take an initial capital letter? Just checking on this while proofreading an article. Examples: portuguese-speaking college ...
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Is the word language in this context a proper noun?

My phrase is "Spanish language TV spend" with respect to advertising on Spanish language TV ads. In this context, should the l in language be capitalized?
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How to unambiguously refer to someone from India [duplicate]

One can refer to an American Indian as a Native American, but I cannot come up with an unambiguous term for an Indian from the Indian subcontinent. How can I refer to someone who is from the country ...
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1answer
183 views

How can I refer to the population of a town keeping the name of the town? [duplicate]

There are words like New Yorkers, Londoners, etc.: (1) they keep the name of the city/town; (2) they refer to the people living in it. How do I fulfill both conditions for a small town called ...
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6answers
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Short, Politically Correct word for Native Americans [closed]

No more than four syllables, more PC than Indians. EDIT: I arbitrarily chose four syllables because any more seemed like a mouthful. I like to be PC and not have to stumble over 6+ syllables.
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Politically correct way to refer to a French individual

What is currently accepted as the proper title for a person from France? Is it still the gender-specific Frenchman/Frenchwoman, or is Frenchperson the new term? (I use French as just an example, ...
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1answer
107 views

Which is the proper usage: a city name or its demonym?

Which is the correct usage? Oh c'mon New York ... how difficult is it to stay in your traffic lane? or Oh c'mon New Yorkers ... how difficult is it to stay in your traffic lane?
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884 views

Are there any terms equivalent to 'Americana' for other cultures?

Given the available definition of Americana as pertaining to "artifacts, or a collection of artifacts, related to the history, geography, folklore and cultural heritage of the United States", are ...
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Why don't Americans refer to Indians (and others from the subcontinent) as Asians?

I know there is a related question here, but I am not seeing an answer to "Why is there a difference?" Merely that an explanation of what is used in each country. I am a speaker of American English, ...
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1answer
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What is the correct way to form a demonym from an acronym?

For instance, what is the equivalent of New Yorker when using the acronym (NY or N.Y. instead of New York)?
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5answers
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“I'm Spanish” or “I'm a Spanish”?

Which one is correct? I am quite sure about "I'm Spanish", but is it wrong if I add an "a" before "Spanish"?
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5answers
11k views

What do you call a Swiss man?

So we call a French male "Frenchman", an English male "Englishman", and a Dutch male "Dutchman". what do we call Swiss males? "Swissman" comes to mind, but it sounds like a cheesy version of ...
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1answer
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How does one capitalize words like “un-American”?

Google's dictionary lists it as "un-American" or "unAmerican" (which looks clumsy to me). Since American is a "demonym," I would usually capitalize it, so I feel compelled to capitalize "un-American" ...
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17answers
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What do you call hypothetical inhabitants living on the Moon? [closed]

I'm writing a fiction where inhabitants live on the Moon, so I want a name for them. I know that 'venusian' means 'of or relating to the planet Venus', 'martian' means 'of or relating to the planet ...
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1answer
551 views

Adjective relating to Great Britain and Ireland

Is there an adjective meaning “from or pertaining to the British Isles” (or if you prefer “from Great Britain, Ireland or surrounding islands”, or “from the Atlantic Archipelago”, or whatever floats ...
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2answers
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Why do only a few English demonyms indicate gender?

A friend recently pondered why Latino/Latina inflects according to gender. I suggested that it's because Latino is a loanword from a language with grammatical gender, but he found it odd that other ...
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If the plural of ‘man’ is ‘men,’ shouldn’t the plural of ‘German’ be ‘Germen’?

What makes these two words so different that 'man' is changed to 'men', but 'German' is changed to 'Germans'?
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2answers
943 views

Referring to people from different parts of United Kingdom

I see four people in front of me. One is from Wales, one is from Scotland, one is from England and one is from Northern Ireland. I can say about each one "He is Scottish/Welsh/English". But, how do I ...
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3answers
680 views

What is the proper demonym for someone from Shreveport?

A tweet popped up in my feed recently that posed a really good question. On first blush I thought "Oh, I can answer this!" then upon further reflection I realized I can't. In the case of "New Yorkers"...
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Is it unidiomatic to say “an Australian person” or “an Aussie person”?

As mentioned in For people, can you say "a British" like you can say "an Australian"?, you can use "an Australian" to talk about an Australian person. But is it also ok to use "an ...
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For people, can you say “a British” like you can say “an Australian”?

According to Wiktionary, you can't use "a British" to refer to individual British people, though you can use it to refer to a race of people as a whole, but you can use "an Australian", and this ...