Questions tagged [degree-of-comparison]

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Is "Our creamiest coffee, now creamier" correct?

Kopiko's tagline here in the Philippines became a hot topic. Others had been saying that it is grammatically wrong but others said that it is correct.
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3 answers
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Unequal Comparison Relations

Comparison He visits his family less frequently than she does He speaks Spanish more frequently than I In the first example why "does" is used after the pronoun she and why "do" ...
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0 answers
42 views

Is "far further" correct?

"Between his support for packing the Supreme Court and legalizing abortion up until the point of birth, there's no question that Buttigieg was far further to the Left of former President Barack Obama."...
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0 answers
16 views

Changing of degrees [duplicate]

Consider this sentence: This is the best book I have ever read. Now if I transform this into a sentence and use positive degree as Never have I read a book as good as this. Is this sentence ...
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6 votes
3 answers
2k views

Relation between "trivial", "more than trivial", and "less than trivial"

I am a non-native speaker who thought understood the meaning of 'less than trivial' to mean more complicated than trivial. My intuition came from assuming that given an adjective then 'less than' ...
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1 answer
10k views

What is the comparative degree of the word "last"?

What is the comparative degree of "last"? I have searched a lot on Google but have not been able to find the answer.
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1 vote
1 answer
298 views

is ‘fine’ in the sense ‘of very good quality’ gradable? [closed]

Fine in the sense of very good quality seems to be an absolute adjective, and since absolute adjectives are not gradable, so I am wondering if this principle applies to fine in the sense ‘of very good ...
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2 answers
1k views

Does the phrase "not nearly as many as" imply some level of similarity?

If a sentence would say: X has nearly as many Ys as Z. I think it would be understood that it means that X has fewer Ys than Z has, but it is not that much fewer. I.e. X has almost as many as Z. ...
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Why the word "fine" is often used as "just satisfying" instead of "very high quality"?

The definition still says, of high quality. "this was a fine piece of filmmaking" · "fine wines" But too many times, we see people using the word to describe a so-so state, like &...
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1 answer
1k views

What’s the correct use of “last/late/latter/latter” in time expressions?

I always get these adjectives and determiners confused as regards their use and shades of meaning. Let's take a structure meaning “in the last few years”. Would it be right to use any of the following ...
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2 answers
231 views

Comparative form of adverbs [closed]

What is the comparative form of the adverb always?
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2 votes
1 answer
1k views

sentence structures using different degrees of adjectives

I am not a native speaker. I feel very confused whenever I write sentences like the following using comparative or positive degree.I want native speakers to guide me which of the following sentences ...
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43 votes
15 answers
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Single-word antonym for "cheapest"?

I've been doing a translation for an article and it occured to me that I don't know a one-word antonym for the word 'cheapest'. I tried googling it, and the best suggestion I got was 'expensive', but ...
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Is there a term/phrase that covers vague comparisons?

Take the phrase "X Corp has a turnover greater than some small countries". A pedant will want to know the criteria for "small" country, are they developing or industrialised countries, what's the GDP ....
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1 vote
1 answer
166 views

Can I change a sentence of the adverb of 'Apace' as Apacer in comparative adjective joining 'er'

Can I change a sentence of the adverb of 'Apace' as Apacer in comparative adjective joining 'er' For example: "She continued to work apace but he did apacer than her" I really looked for it in ...
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3 answers
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What are the best words to describe subjects being compared?

I tried to Google this but no luck so far. I was wondering if there was proper words to describe the comparison of 2 subjects? The first subject would be the object being compared in relation to the ...
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4 votes
1 answer
576 views

Why "respect you most" instead of "respect you more" in the following quote by Samuel Johnson?

"Go into the street and give one man a lecture on morality and another a shilling, and see which will respect you most." British Literature 1640-1789 I can't figure out why Johnson used "most" ...
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2 votes
3 answers
3k views

Definite article with the superlative degree of adverbs

Our rotary telephone is the least frequently used device in our house. Ben moved most quietly as the boys walked down the darkened ally. In the first sentence a superlative adverb is used with the (...
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4 votes
1 answer
6k views

Is there a word for "conjugating" an adjective?

Verbs can be conjugated to past/future tenses. Nouns can be pluralized. Adjectives also have comparative and superlative forms. For example fast, faster, and fastest. What is the word that describes ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Comparative... Marginally, Substantially and Exceedingly above average

Is my understanding of the use of "Marginally", "Substantially" and "Exceedingly" correct as per the depiction below?
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3 answers
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Has the illogical "three times bigger" replaced "three times as big" in common usage?

If A is one time bigger than B, it is equal to 2B. So if A is three times bigger than B, it is equal to 4B. Yet I am seeing "two times bigger" to mean "twice as large" in more and more places. Any ...
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4 votes
3 answers
6k views

Which season do you like (better / best), spring or winter? [duplicate]

Which season do you like (better / best), spring or winter? I was told the answer is better, but why is that so? Both better and best would make sense, I think.
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5 votes
5 answers
47k views

Which is more proper "rarest" or "most rare"?

In the following usage, which is the correct form for the superlative of the adjective "rare"? "the rarest on Earth" or "the most rare on Earth"?
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1 vote
2 answers
523 views

"More acrid than" but "stupider than" Why is that? [duplicate]

I've just read this quotation here at StackExchange: "Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that." I've checked a few online dictionaries and there ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Degrees of comparison for words ending in "-ly"

Would you make a word ending in -ly positive, comparative, or superlative? I'm sort of leaning towards positive at the moment, and if the answer is positive, would you put more and most for ...
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3 votes
2 answers
5k views

As fast as Or As fast

He is as clever if not cleverer than his brother. Ranjeet is as fast as or perhaps faster than Rohit. Are both these sentences correct? As per Wren And Martin High School English Grammar And ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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What is wrong with mixing “taller” and “tallest” like this?

Although the towers appear identical, the west tower is the tallest, standing 16 feet taller than the east tower. What might be wrong? Does it have to do with comparative and superlative degrees?
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5 votes
4 answers
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The superlative of sincere

Is the usage sincerest gratitude wrong?Can we use such in acknowledgements?
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6 votes
6 answers
19k views

In mathematics, when referring to pure numbers is largest or biggest correct?

When referring to a list of number is largest or biggest correct? For example, I want to find the biggest number in an array. Or should it be the largest number. Finally, would either biggest or ...
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2 votes
4 answers
1k views

Is this superlative degree because of usage of most or is it positive degree?

Most of the rare plants are found in silent valley. Am confused as to which degree this sentence belongs, as it has the word 'most' which is superlative, but also the adjective, 'rare' is in positive ...
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2 votes
3 answers
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"Brief" and "complete" — need an intermediate between them

Let's say you have some ideas and are going to share them on the Internet. You have a Twitter account, a blog and an ability to publish your thoughts in a magazine. You're writing three articles, all ...
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4 votes
3 answers
960 views

Does "No more" by necessity imply there was some before?

If I say "I have no more apples" do I have to have had some apples to begin with? Is there an instance where I could start with none and still say I had no more sensically?
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5 votes
1 answer
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Good and bad - suppletive adjectives

In English, there are three suppletive adjectives: good, bad and far. Their comparative and superlative forms derive from different stems, i.e., we have best instead of *goodest, worse instead of *...
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29 votes
6 answers
64k views

Equivalent of "former" and "latter" for more than 2 items

Former and latter are valid only when there are two choices. If I have a list of more than two items, is there an elegant way to say the first one or the last one?
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