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Questions tagged [countable-nouns]

Countable nouns can be modified by a quantity.

65
votes
11answers
19k views

“Less” vs. “fewer”

I've just received a memo which says (effectively) As more people leave, there will be less people available. I want that word to be fewer. Are there guidelines for which word ought to be used ...
32
votes
6answers
30k views

Types of things vs. types of thing

When speaking precisely or technically, one would say that "Homo erectus and homo sapiens are two species of hominid" rather than "Homo erectus and homo sapiens are two species of hominids." The ...
12
votes
13answers
25k views

Plural of “advice”

The dictionary says that advice can only be used in the singular. But in a specific part of computer science (aspect-oriented programming) this word is used to reference some object that implements ...
8
votes
1answer
5k views

“I like apples” vs “I like apple”?

If I understand it correctly, nouns for fruits (and certain types of foodstuffs, such as pizza) are used as mass nouns if thought of as "food substance", rather than "portions". So is it correct that ...
7
votes
4answers
93k views

Why is bread uncountable? How do you describe the “three breads” in the picture?

In this picture there are "three breads", but they are not loaves because loaves can be cut into pieces, and they are not slices either because they weren't cut with a knife. So the only way to refer ...
3
votes
2answers
631 views

Discrete units of continuous quantity

Is it proper to speak of units of a continuous quantity as if they are discrete or continuous? For example, I never know whether I should say that some food has "less calories" than another food (...
2
votes
4answers
4k views

Why is liquid a countable noun? [closed]

I read this sentence in a description to a podcast from https://www.eslpod.com/website/index_new.html Batter, “batter,” when we talk about cooking is a liquid, made usually with eggs, and flower, ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

When can uncountable nouns be countable?

I have a question about uncountable nouns that are used as countable in certain situations. When it comes to some uncountable nouns such as fruit, cake, coffee etc., I have found out that they can ...
1
vote
2answers
6k views

Are frozen pizzas countable or uncountable?

As you know pizzas are countable But when you add another word like, frozen, does it remain countable? Generally, when you add an adjective to a countable word are there any changes?
11
votes
4answers
117k views

So, “Some advice” or “some advices”? Which is correct?

"Some advice" or "some advices" as in "I got some advice / advices for you"? So, Which is correct? In Oxford Learner's Dictionaries, "advice" is uncountable noun, so "Some advice" is the correct one....
6
votes
3answers
1k views

A code or some code?

When talking about the source code of a program, my Computer Science teacher sometimes refers to single pieces of code as 'a code'. For example: For today's task, you need to write a code which ...
1
vote
4answers
9k views

I like dog or I like dogs which is correct and why?

Why do we say 'I like dogs'? Why can't we say 'I like dog' if we are referring to a particular dog? Most people use 'I like dogs'. Which is correct and why?
8
votes
2answers
15k views

Is it “if you need further instruction” or “if you need further instructions”?

Having a debate with a friend about whether it is "instruction" or "instructions"
2
votes
2answers
15k views

One type of good - singular or plural

I've read conflicting advice on the use of the word "goods" in an economic context (e.g. "goods for sale"). One piece of advice is that it is a plural noun that should never be used singular (e.g. "...
23
votes
1answer
1k views

British Mass Nouns versus American Count Nouns

British English often employs mass nouns where American English would only employ count nouns. Count nouns are nouns which take pluralization and numerical quantifiers like 'many'. Mass nouns can't be ...
8
votes
4answers
7k views

Is radish countable or uncountable?

Are vegetables like cabbage, lettuce, radish countable or not when we talk about food? Which is correct? "We have some cabbage in the kitchen." Or "We have a cabbage." "I added some radishes to the ...
6
votes
1answer
392 views

Countable ingredient pluralization for English cookbooks

The rule for countable ingredient pluralization appears to be: If more than one countable ingredient is necessary to fill the required amount, then the ingredient is pluralized. For example: 2 ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Can 'surgery' be a count noun in the sense of 'medical procedure'?

This is something that has bothered me for a long time. Several years ago a remember noticing in the media a shift from using "An operation" to "A surgery" when talking about someone who was ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Is “troop” unique among English words in meaning both a group and an individual member of that kind of group?

The term "troop" can mean a group of soldiers, or it can mean an individual soldier (perhaps in this usage it was originally short for "trooper"). In fact, in modern usage, the plural "troops" almost ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

My favorite food is apples. Is it ok? [duplicate]

My favorite food is apples. Or my favorite food are apples.
-1
votes
1answer
7k views

“Most of what” and “is” or “are”

I've gotten into an argument about whether "Most of what I've read is books" or "Most of what I've read are books" is correct. I think it should be "is" because "most of" refers to "what I've read" ...
1
vote
2answers
585 views

Possible “rule” for uncountable nouns

In looking at many of the answers to ESL learner's questions about countable and uncountable nouns it seems that answers usually take the form "Uncountables can be become countables. There's no rule ...
1
vote
2answers
7k views

Is 'experience' countable or uncountable? [closed]

"Seeing the Grand Canyon was certainly____(an /some) experience." Is experience countable or uncountable? Should I use some or an?
0
votes
1answer
901 views

Plural of “radiation”, “reflectance” and similar words

I am not a native speaker, nor do I know the proper grammatical name of this kind of words to look up this question. So please excuse the possible duplication or simplicity. But as far as I know, the ...
0
votes
3answers
14k views

Why do we say “I am in a good mood” and not just “I am in good mood”?

I'm just curious to know, why do we say "I am in a good mood" not "I am in good mood"? Is there any grammatical rule for that?
-2
votes
1answer
2k views

Do nonsense and bull**** have corresponding plural forms?

For example, I've heard nonsenses, but I've never heard bullshits. Why one is plural and the other is singular? They mean the same thing.