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6
votes
2answers
144 views

“…I don't have money, but what I do have *are* a very particular set of skills.” Is this correct?

If you are looking for ransom I can tell you I don't have money, but what I do have are a very particular set of skills. I'm talking about that verb in italics, because I'm not sure if I'm an idiot ...
0
votes
1answer
119 views

“Babies grow very quickly.” In this sentence is “grow” a copula or a lexical verb?

"Grow" is classified as a change-of-state copula but by definition, copulas may be followed by adjective phrases, noun phrases, or adverbial prepositional phrases. "Very quickly" is an intensifier (...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Can a linking verb be transitive?

I found the following example on oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com. This is from the first entry of the verb feel. A pattern 'feel something' is given under this entry, while the verb 'feel' is listed as ...
1
vote
4answers
5k views

“lie quiet” vs “lie quietly”

Is it correct to say “I will lie quiet beneath his touch”? Shouldn’t it be “I will lie quietly beneath his touch”?
0
votes
1answer
58 views

What is correct between the two sentences?

Consider these two versions: You can live peacefully without your wants, but your life can be miserable with all your wants within your reach. You can live peacefully without your wants, but ...
0
votes
3answers
15k views

What are all the words that make up a complete list of linking verbs in English?

What are all the words that make up a complete list of linking verbs in English? My English teacher from what I can remember listed them as follows, am I missing any? is • am • are • was • were • be ...
1
vote
1answer
824 views

“Appear” followed by a verb: Necessarily a copula (linking verb)?

I’m wondering how I can structurally determine when a verb is being used as a copula and when it is not. Specifically, is the verb “appear” followed by a verb NECESSARILY a copula (i.e., linking verb)?...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

A weird usage of “were” instead of “was” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Was” or “were” in subjunctive clauses “If I was” or “If I were”. Which is more common, and which is correct? Why have the ...
4
votes
3answers
14k views

Use 'got' instead of 'was'? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is “to get” sometimes used where “to be” could be used? Sometimes I hear people say things like this: I just got robbed. (Personally I would rather say 'I was robbed' ...
24
votes
5answers
21k views

Is there any other way you can “wax” as you do when you “wax philosophical”?

The wax in the phrase "wax philosophical" is a pretty strange bird. Its wax is obviously not the ordinary definition of wax, which my dictionary summarizes as an "oily, water-resistant substance", a ...