Questions tagged [coordination]

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1answer
59 views

When to use “And” at the start of sentence? [duplicate]

I know that and is used to join two sentences or phrases. There are some places I've read that have And is used at the beginning of a sentence. What are the occasions when this is done?
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9 views

Disecting a sentence with the coodinating conjunction “or”

The sentence: "The token has passed a third-party review or security audit that deems it as safe, or be using a well-known audited framework" Does "third-party" only count for "review", or does "...
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40 views

Low-level “and” versus top-level “and”

Here is an imaginary situation: I'm an owner of a small bookstore, just opened. We don't have any fiction books; only the mathematics and physics ones. Some of our books are about math only, some - ...
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1answer
29 views

Does 'Then' after 'And' require a comma?

I was writing a compound sentence, that required a 'Then' after the coordinating conjunction. I was wondering if the 'Then' needed a comma before and after it, such as thus: "It is best to review ...
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2answers
67 views

Who is lost in thought in “I had no glimmer of what was in his mind, nor did he enlighten me, but sat lost in thought…”? [closed]

I'd like someone to clear up the sentence that seems ambiguous to me. It's from "The problem of the Thor Bridge" by Conan Doyle. I had no glimmer of what was in his mind, nor did he enlighten me, ...
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1answer
42 views

“And” vs “Or” in a list with a negative modifier

If a given set of instructions says, for example: Failure to complete assignments A, B, and C will result in punishment. Does that indicate that failure to do all of those assignments and only all ...
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4answers
226 views

Nonrestrictive Clauses and Coordinating conjunction separating two independent clauses

Quick, not so simple question. I know that, if you join two independent clauses with a coordinating conjunction (like "and"), you need a comma before the coordinating conjunction. For example: I ...
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1answer
47 views

Connectors and Coordinating Conjunctions. Connector FOR

After FOR (as Coordinating Conjunction) could be a -ING verb ? I know after FOR can be a clause with Subject, verb and complements for example: I asked him to stop, FOR I had something important to ...
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1answer
86 views

Comma or no in a two item list where those items are phrases

I am editing some copy, and I'm not sure how to handle these examples. Here is the structure that concerns me: As a consequence of the magic curse, the cakes dance the salsa[,] and the birds eat ...
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2answers
44 views

You and Ted's dinner conversation tonight

This was addressed to a family regarding what they should talk about at dinner that night. Should "you" be "your"? What is the rule?
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1answer
1k views

Difference between BUT and YET

We perceive a difference between "but" and "yet"; that is, they're not perfectly interchangeable. So how can the difference be defined, anyway? They're both conjunctions. I was trying to explain to ...
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1answer
56 views

Comma or semicolon between independent clauses that have internal commas and that are joined by a coordinating conjunction

In high school I learned that when joining two independent clauses where either contained a comma I should always use a semicolon before the coordinating conjunction. For example, If Alice had known ...
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1answer
51 views

Can a conjuction prevent run-on sentences without punctuation?

I understand that run-on sentences join independent clauses without a word to connect them or a punctuation mark to separate them, but can a connecting word suffice to prevent a sentence from running ...
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1answer
379 views

Can we use "Since…, thus… as a grammatically valid sentence?

I am wondering if below sentence (and in general, all similar sentences) is grammatically correct and semantically meaningful: Since I have graduated from school, thus I should find a job.
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1answer
49 views

Can “ comma + and” be part of a non-restrictive clause?

Companies have competed with each other, providing better services, and have done so, while keeping costs low. Is the sentence above correct? I know that when there is a "comma + one of the FANBOYS" ...
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1answer
52 views

David’s friendly demeanour, brilliant sense of humour and warmth, “make” or “makes” you feel right at home. [duplicate]

Should I use make or makes in the following sentence? David’s friendly demeanour, brilliant sense of humour and warmth, make you feel right at home. I say make, but my friend says makes.
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1answer
99 views

Correct or not: noun and adjective being predicative together

I'm thinking about such a sentence: He is a lawyer, arrogant and smart. or He is an idiot, arrogant and short-sighted. Please note that here I just want to list the noun and the ...
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2answers
95 views

Is “if you need help or having trouble” correct?

Well, I have been struggling with this for a while now. My friend wrote a piece of documentation for his software, in which he included this sentence: This repository contains [software name] API ...
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2answers
60 views

In the table, water usage in Brazil and America “is compared” or “are compared”? Which one is correct?

Which of the following sentences is correct? In the table, water usage in Brazil and America is compared. or In the table, water usage in Brazil and America are compared.
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19 views

“What {is/are} the meaning and connotations of this phrase?” Which is correct here, “is” or “are”? [duplicate]

Consider the question: What is/are the meaning and connotations of this phrase? Clearly you would say: What is the meaning of this phrase? What are connotations of this phrase? and ...
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2k views

can “and therefore” be acceptable in the following sentence?

In my view, children and adults cannot be seen as identical in the eyes of the law, and therefore age must be taken into account when punishing offenders. As and is a coordinator and therefore is a ...
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1answer
35 views

“…We can only lose, and our love become a funeral pyre.” - distributed modal verb or subjunctive?

From The Doors, Light My Fire. The lines are: "Try now, we can only lose And our love become a funeral pyre." I would never hold their lyrics up as great writing, but I have always wondered exactly ...
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2answers
624 views

“…my passion for teaching and my knowledge of the English language makes me” or “…make me…”?

I am working on my resume. I don’t know if I should use make instead of makes in this sentence. I believe that my passion for teaching and my knowledge of the English language makes me an ideal ...
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0answers
487 views

The nuance between “and so do I” and “but so do l”

I am not an native English speaker; I am therefore often perplexed by analogies between synonyms or phrases. Here's a question I occasionally came up with, and I wonder whether they both are ...
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1answer
84 views

In this example, is the correct usage 'she' or 'her'? [closed]

In this example, is the correct usage 'she' or 'her'? Jenny administers the second high-dose adrenaline shot and her and Bron change places on the table. Chest compressions are tiring, so they ...
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1answer
38 views

“But” usage grammar

I read the below sentence somewhere. I think it's not making sense. "But" is contradicting the earlier said clause. "He is dead, this is what the police is concluding after searching for him across ...
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0answers
260 views

“Since my bachelor’s and master’s degree” or “…bachelor’s and master’s degrees”?

What do you think is the proper sentence (and why) between Since my bachelor’s and master’s degree Since my bachelor’s and master’s degrees My head tells me the second one is the proper ...
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1answer
86 views

Is it correct to use “his or her” after “Neither Jake nor Janet…”?

Is the following sentence grammatically correct: "Neither Jake nor Janet brought his or her homework to class." I understand that it has recently become acceptable to use a singular they for ...
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1answer
1k views

How to distinguish between Principal clause and Subordinate clause in a sentence? [closed]

How can I distinguish between a principal clause and a subordinate clause in a sentence to use a subordinating conjunction? I saw him, I stopped my car. I know I have to add when before I saw him. ...
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1answer
183 views

“I was late, and so I got fired.” Can we use two conjunctions in a row?

Is it incorrect to use "and so" to link an antecedent and a consequent, when "so" alone would do it? Note: there is an existing question with a similar title (Use of “ and so”) in the EL&U ...
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0answers
122 views

Does this paragraph contain a comma error?

Should there be a comma before the coordinating conjunction 'and' in this paragraph? "The High court determined that no contract existed between the two parties because under an objective standard, a ...
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2answers
417 views

“…the person or body who…” vs. “…the person or body which…”

When referring to both natural and non-natural persons (i.e. organisations) at the same time, is it appropriate to use 'which' or 'who'? For example: 1. '... request the person or body who has the ...
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1answer
459 views

Can subordinate conjunctions in some cases act as coordinate conjunctions?

I'll just mention a simple example to make myself clear. English Rules suggest that a Compound Sentence can be formed using the following structures: 1.) [Independent Clause] , coordinate conj. [...
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1answer
437 views

The time and place “is” or “are” listed in the invitation?

Which is correct? the time and place is listed in the invitation the time and place are listed in the invitation
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2answers
318 views

Punctuation and grammar “is important” or “are important”?

Should it be: Punctuation and grammar is important. or should it be: Punctuation and grammar are important. Does it make any difference in the following sentence: Both punctuation as well ...
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0answers
34 views

Can a comma before a coordinating conjunction be parenthetical? [duplicate]

Can an ostensibly misused comma before a coordinating conjunction actually be a parenthetical comma? Consider: Sally picked apples, and placed them in her basket. This is considered a misuse of ...
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2answers
364 views

Comma usage before coordinating conjunction after a long clause

It is correct to put a comma before a coordinating conjunction when the second clause is independent of the first, e.g., Sally picked apples, and she placed them in her basket. but not if you ...
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1answer
150 views

Grammatically correct form of enumeration with “range from * to *”

Although there are many questions regarding the use of "range from * to *", I could not find the perfectly-fitting inquiry from the search, so I'm asking this question. Is the following legitimate ...
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0answers
25 views

Specify a maximum and a minimum value [a question on coordination]

Let's say we are asking the user to specify a maximum and a minimum. What is the correct (and the most natural) way to coordinate the phrase? Specify a maximum and a minimum value Specify a maximum ...
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2answers
129 views

The double “for”

The last thing I wanted to have happen was for some to become upset and for cold feelings to come within us and ruin our will to cooperate. Is the second "for", before "cold", required?
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1answer
360 views

FANBOYS-RULE (Coordinating conjunctions)?

How do I figure out when to use a comma before "so"? 1) I put it on my blog so you can read it. (means: I put it on my web blog because I want you to be able to read it.) 2) I didn't find any eggs ...
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1answer
36 views

Punctuation in this case clear? [duplicate]

I think in the first one, I don't need a comma before "and" cause they are short sentences. In the second however, I'm wondering whether I need the comma before "and" since it is a coordinating ...
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1answer
162 views

coordinating conjunction and (with comma)…?

coordinating conjunctions? Do I have to put the comma before "and" here? a) In 2007, I moved to New York, and Peter moved to Berlin. b) I created a code, and in each of them are numbers. c) ...
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0answers
1k views

“What is your name and height” or “What are your name and height”

When searching on Google, I found that it's a lot more common to use is than are in phrases such as "What is/are your name and date of birth?". Why is that? To me, it feels more natural to use is in ...
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1answer
286 views

“Fish and meat gives…” or “Fish and meat give…”? [duplicate]

Fish and meat gives us protein. Or Fish and meat give us protein. Thank you I appreciate your help.
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0answers
107 views

“What are Liam and Noel's jobs?” versus “What are Liam's and Noel's jobs?” [duplicate]

This question is about use of the group genitive versus joint possessives in a phrase and/or list. Where two or more distinct persons, animals, etc., are in the genitive, the group genitive ...
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0answers
28 views

Using “are” when referring to the sum of different categories of information [duplicate]

I know that the word "infomation" is always singular in English. However, is it grammatically correct to use "are" when refering to sum of different categories of information (e.g., in the following ...
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1answer
60 views

Can “time and convenience” take singular notional agreement in this sentence?

Time and convenience (is/are) turning friends and acquaintances away from our doors. Which is better in this context, 'is' or 'are'? Can the answer to this question be 'is' based on notional ...
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2answers
157 views

Use of “who” after a list of nouns

When used after a list of nouns, does the pronoun who refer to all items in the list or only the last one? How can one avoid ambiguity? E.g.: a) The Romans and the Etruscans, who inhabited modern ...
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4answers
357 views

What is the conceptual distinction between coordinating conjunctions and subordinating conjunctions?

While it is easy enough to identify coordinating and subordinating conjunctions by memorizing lists of them, the actual distinction seems arbitrary. Coordinating conjunctions are said to join (among ...