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Questions tagged [coordinating-conjunctions]

Questions about coordinating conjunctions, such as “and”, “but”, “or”, “nor”, and “so”.

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Is the word “it” needed after a comma in this situation?

Here is an example of my sentence: The physical therapy visit was not dated, did not contain the name or date of service, and therefore could not be validated. Someone is trying to correct me and ...
Annie's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
70 views

Semantic Opposition of 'But': Are These Unlike Constituents Viable Opposites?

I have recently been researching the usage of the word 'But' with specific attention given to its function as a coordinating conjunction, wherein it is used to create contrast. Throughout my research, ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
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0 answers
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What’s the term for the common part of coordination?

What do you call the part that is common to a list? Example: I buy apples, bananas and citrus fruit. can be expanded to three sentences I buy apples. I buy bananas. I buy citrus fruit. How do you ...
Kai Burghardt's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
89 views

CGEL: Clarification on the Given Rules for Contrasting Constituents with 'But'

Please could someone clarify a statement in The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by Huddleston and Pullum? On page 1311 (under section 2.5 'But'), the text makes this comment: A single ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
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What happens when a sentence and an aside require different sentence structures?

How do you handle when an aside -- a parenthetical or a dashed aside -- doesn't fit with what follows, but since the aside is the "closest" thing, the original thing doesn't fit either. ...
Deane's user avatar
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1 answer
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"So" and "yet" as conjunctive adverbs rather than coordinators

I have recently been digging into the "FANBOYS" concept and how "so," "yet," and "for" are not truly coordinating conjunctions in the same vein as the other ...
GrammarCop's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
280 views

Is it grammatical to say "... is both popular and has presented ...'

This particular example comes from a peer-reviewed publication with authors who seem to be native speakers: This trend is both popular and has presented a variety of challenges I wonder if this is ...
MWB's user avatar
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-2 votes
2 answers
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Use "and" and "or" in a single sentence to enable three options. Please parse [closed]

So I am trying to parse the following sentence structure: X must provide A and B or C. No commas are present and two coordinating conjunctions are present with no hints as to how to parse. I have ...
Thomas Craig's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
53 views

Does comma+conjunction require a subject after it?

Take these examples: "He walked to the store, and he bought bread." "He walked to the store, and bought bread." "He walked to the store and he bought bread." "He ...
Thebiguglyalien's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
244 views

An annoyingly technical question about right nonce-constituent coordination in Huddleston & Pullum (2002)

I'm currently reading Huddleston & Pullum (2002), aka CGEL, specifically the chapter on "right nonce-constituent coordination"; the relevant pages are pp. 1342-1343. My question is about ...
alphabet's user avatar
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Coordinating conjunctions, consequences of actions, and commas

I've managed to completely confuse myself by thinking myself in circles. I know that when a coordinating conjunction joins two independent clauses (unless they're particularly short), you need to use ...
tinyhipsterboy's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
91 views

Middle English “Whan that” vs “Whan”

whan pronoun Definitions (Senses and Subsenses) whom MED online University of Michigan How does one construe “that” in the phrase “Whan that”? This seems to be the normal construction in ME, but ...
sks's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
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The way to join multiple relative clauses

One sentence on this website says: It is caused chiefly by kleptocratic governments or private interests in league with governments that make market exchange unprofitable, that make investment in ...
nomen's user avatar
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1 answer
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Regarding a sentence involving coordination and subject-auxiliary inversion

When I am reading a paper, I come across a long sentence: Only when this pain remains with you, is with you eternally, can you enjoy eternally the pace and dance of humanity, can praise the shouts ...
thatness's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
600 views

Are FANBOYS the ONLY coordinating conjunctions that can coordinate two independent clauses? Are there any others? [duplicate]

I wanted clarification on exactly which coordinating conjunctions can take independent clauses. This question rose when I looked up the definition of because in some dictionary. That dictionary said ...
Vida's user avatar
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Is adjective ellipsis possible when coordinating between uncountable nouns and countable nouns preceded by articles?

A sentence like "The man has white hair and beard" is totally acceptable in languages without countable/uncountable nouns or articles, and languages where modifiers follow the head noun (...
Dom's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
320 views

Can all coordinating conjunctions be used to connect nouns, adjectives, etc. as well as clauses?

To the best of my knowledge, there are seven coordinating conjunctions only five of which can connect nouns, phrases, adjectives, and clauses. That's what they are said to do: connect those things. ...
Robin's user avatar
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1 answer
56 views

for/and/so: Are all three of those conjunctions equally acceptable in this situation?

I’m trying to connect two different clauses, each with its own subject and tensed verb, but I don’t know when to use one conjunction instead of another to do so. To summarize, I know that: And = ...
meepyer's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
40 views

Is "and" needed here?

Could anyone tell me if the following sentence is correct? Do we need an and before funded? The professor undertook the XXXXX research project, aiming at improving the efficiency of the YYYY system, ...
SoftTimur's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
405 views

Using “including” vs. “and include”

I came across this sentence: The benefits of exercise are vast, including improved cardiovascular health.... I can tell something’s off here — I believe it should be either The benefits of exercise ...
dewy vapours's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
43 views

Can 'although' and 'even if' both be correct in the following sentence? [closed]

Which one do you think is more appropriate in the following sentence? I feel 'even if' sounds better to me. But I am not sure. I take the dog for a walk every day even if sometimes it is raining. I ...
user454962's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
34 views

Should I add a comma in this sentence?

When are you leaving and how long are you going to stay there? It's from my English textbook. I remembered that If you want to connect two simple sentences into a compound sentence with "and&...
cuyoyo's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
46 views

Using "As" at beginning of a sentence

A company called Goodbrothers (for the sake of argument) wants to advertise its environmental credentials, using As Goodbrothers, we always pay attention to environmental concerns. In this context, ...
user351999's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
72 views

Syntactically, are elements joined by a coordinating conjunction considered one unit?

When we join two nouns by a coordinating conjunction, we can say that this forms a noun phrase. This is evident, as it can be supplemented by an appositive (example below). Peter and Jane, a devote ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
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0 answers
18 views

How to grammatically explain this sentence? [duplicate]

No compassion for the suffering or willingness to engage in dialogue with feminism. I know it can be paraphrased as: "[He] has neither compassion [for women's suffering], nor willingness to ...
Lemon's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
495 views

is the phrase "Leading To" a coordinating conjunction? [closed]

I read that it is a rule of thumb to use a comma before any coordinating conjunctions that link two independent clauses (I have issues with knowing when to add a comma). for example, I have the ...
Thanoss's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
36 views

Commas Around a Disjunct After a Coordinating Conjunction? [duplicate]

Which punctuation is correct for this sentence? : "I took the dog to the park this morning and, of course, he needed a bath afterwards because he rolled in the mud." "I took the dog to the park this ...
kasethula's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
78 views

Question on the use of 'but'

I would like to ask a question about the use of the conjunction 'but' in a specific sentence. Before I ask the question, I shall provide some context (for otherwise this answer will be closed). ...
Eric's user avatar
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0 answers
29 views

Two 'and's in a title [duplicate]

I have written a paper which I have titled in the format Adjective1 and Adjective2 Noun1 and Noun2. Both adjectives modify only Noun1. The two nouns are inherently not related and the point of the ...
Ken Gonzales's user avatar
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0 answers
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Commas after a coordinating conjunction [duplicate]

I know that one puts a comma before a coordinating conjunction when there are two independent clauses. However, in the following sentence, when the phrase in non-essential, would one put a comma ...
English Lover's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
182 views

Is it ever grammatically correct to say "And you, my."

If it is acceptable to answer I love you. with And I you. which we could represent as: And I love you. Would it be acceptable to answer: You're my hero. with And you my. in other words: And ...
Molly's user avatar
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14 votes
2 answers
6k views

'For' is a coordinating conjunction, but 'because' is a subordinating conjunction. Is that right? Can someone explain why?

He went to bed, for he was tired. (For = coordinating conjunction) He went to bed, because he was tired. (Because = subordinating conjunction) Is this correct? If so, I'm confused. In all the examples ...
Sarah's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
39 views

Question about parallel structures

One of the tasks that we have to do on PTE exam is to paraphrase a writtent text. I have prepared a template for myslef which is While the impacts of N and N such as N and N are important, the effects ...
Abbas Rajabpour's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
64 views

"I think therefore I am" parataxis?

Is the sentence "I think therefore I am" a case of parataxis (joining sentences without a conjunction)?
Exp's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
144 views

Does a coordinate clause include a coordinator (/coordinating conjunction)?

Does a coordinate clause include a coordinator (/coordinating conjunction)? For example: "It was apple-blossom time, and the days were getting warmer." Is "and the days were getting ...
Exp's user avatar
  • 125
0 votes
1 answer
34 views

A series of 4 elements, which can be considered as 2 series of 2 elements

Below is a sentence from the manual about naming files that I'm working on. Avoid including words that are clear from the parent path (2011), the file type (presentation), are obvious for some other ...
user90726's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
301 views

Is it possible to have an interrogative after an imperative connected with coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence?

I know rephrasing, using semicolon, or just splitting it into two sentences are probably the possible options here (the best choice, however, is my side question). Consider the following as examples: ...
Afsane's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
113 views

How to determine whether "and" or "or" is correct when listing excluded entities?

As an example, a road sign might say: No trucks and buses Or perhaps: No trucks or buses Which one is correct and why?
Starshot's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

How are multiple properties of the same thing properly described?

I am sorry but I could not come up with a better way of describing what I am trying to achieve in this sentence: As such, their creation should follow a rationale and their interpretation be ...
user410347's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
150 views

Are "Yet" and "However" synonymous?

It is quite common to use "yet" and "however" in contrastive constructions, but l am not certain if they have the same sense. John failed. Yet, he's tried his best. John failed. ...
Mohamed Ali's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
68 views

Coordinating conjunctions between different pairs that are close to each other

I'd like to write a sentence with the following "logical structure": I ' can ,-----------'-------------, ...
Nicola Sap's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
139 views

double and's in list and commas

I would like to know if the following sentence is correctly written. The reason I am asking is that I write in British English so do not put a comma before 'and' (that comes before the last item) in a ...
Manish 's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
28 views

Which is the correct usage of "and" in American English in this example? [duplicate]

Scenario 1 A series of unfortunate events has led Makoto "Edamame" Edamura to adopt the life of crime—pickpocketing and scamming others for a living. However, after swindling a seemingly ...
Matthew Trip's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
179 views

Using an present-participle verb as conjunction?

Seeking feedback on the validity of this sentence, which tries to use the present-participle "helping" as a kind of conjunction: (company name) is the best marketing platform helping teams ...
Rikki Tikki's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

Improper placement of a comma

Consider the following sentence, "Skye will become a doctor, and a priest if he finishes theology school." My understanding is that the comma before the "and" does not follow the ...
Indira Singh's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
74 views

Is ";so," an acceptable grammar structure?

For a while, I've been using "so" with a semicolon. For example, I would say, "I like bugs; so, I went to the bug convention happily." I've always thought of the semicolon as a ...
GuffManDude's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
198 views

Is the distinction between "complex sentences" and "compound sentences" real? Is the distinction purely a matter of personal taste?

I am not cheating on my homework. In fact, I no longer have homework; I graduated from college years ago. If you read the entire discussion below, and not just the begining, that should become ...
Toothpick Anemone's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
1k views

"There was/were my brother and two sisters?

"There was [or were?] my brother and two sisters, hugging and tears streaming." I've come across a sentence while editing, and I don't know whether to use "was" or "were." The object of the "be"-verb ...
Arthur Graves's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
99 views

Can we use a comma before "and" if it precedes a dependent clause?

Here is an example from Longman dictionary, We are new to the London area, and would like to eat in restaurants or visit pubs with others. My question is that since the second clause "would like ...
Victor.C's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
41 views

Coordinating privilege as a verb

Simple question, I'm sure, but I'm having trouble finding an answer. I'm writing a methodology and want to say "I will privilege [this theory] over [another]." I can't find any instances of the ...
James Elias's user avatar

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