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Questions tagged [conversational-deletion]

The tendency in conversation to omit portions of a sentence considered referentially obvious or implied to exist.

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0answers
22 views

Is it ok to use just “Careful!” instead of ”Be careful!” preceded by “be”?

Is it “correct” if I say Careful! here without be in front of it? Careful! There is a car coming! Careful! Just one step back and you will fall off the cliff.
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0answers
110 views

What do you think about “Sorry.” as a complete sentence? or What are your thoughts on subject omission? [duplicate]

I've been poring over materials on Japanese (日本語) and found it common of them to contrast the language with English in saying that pronominal subjects can be —and typically are, as with 私は (Watashi ha,...
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0answers
104 views

Is article and auxiliary verb omission in modern English an emerging phenomenon? [duplicate]

I am obviously not talking about newspaper headlines etc. in this question. I tried looking it up online but wasn't able to find much. In many instances of spoken English (and, probably, making its ...
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0answers
239 views

What's the full sentence of “No point both of us getting wet”?

I came across the phrase "No point both of us getting wet" from 'Me before you' novel. Is this phrase from the full sentence of "There is no point (in) both of us getting wet"? If so, anyone could ...
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2answers
522 views

How is it we can omit 'what' from 'What the f--k are you doing?' but not 'how/who' from 'How/who the f--k are you doing?'

What is the difference between What (the) from How (the), Who (the), and other question words so that we can omit not only What but also What the from such sentences as (What the) frick/hell/fuck ...
2
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0answers
58 views

Is there a term that describes leaving out the implied subject of a question? [duplicate]

For example, "Not going? Be sure to cancel at least 24 hours in advance." has an implied "Are you…" in front. Is there a term for this concept? Is it proper grammar (or at least accepted in business ...
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2answers
108 views

Analysing “Ain't got no use for no coal company”

I'm writing my thesis and I have a problem analysing this sentence: "Ain't got no use for no coal company" (Grisham, 2014: 157). I know there's no subject - is it therefore an ellipsis? I don't ...
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1answer
75 views

Term to describe such conversational phrases [closed]

Is there a term to describe colloquial, chatty phrases such as: Weird, I know. Who knew there was a place called Pikachu. You may be wondering... I'm doing a written assignment and I have to ...
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3answers
759 views

Is “Tomorrow good?” a complete sentence?

Is this a complete sentence: Tomorrow good? As I understand it, first you change the interrogatory to declarative so the question becomes whether Tomorrow (is) good is a sentence.
0
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1answer
400 views

Is it okay to start a sentence with “Doesn't matter”? [duplicate]

Is it okay to start a sentence with "Doesn't matter"? Like: Doesn't matter which train you board, you are going to be late for the meeting.
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4answers
3k views

Why do some questions not start with an auxiliary verb?

When I learned English, my teachers told me that all questions must have an auxiliary verb at the beginning, just like Are you mad? or Is she playing? do. But when watching some movies or talking ...
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3answers
983 views

Meaning of the phrase “Four pounds if he's an ounce” [duplicate]

In The Thirty-Nine Steps, Sir Walter is describing a fish and says "Look at that big fellow. Four pounds if he's an ounce." I've heard similar phrases before but never understood what is being said ...
12
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3answers
309k views

“Good to hear” vs “Glad to hear”

Which one is correct: Good to hear you enjoyed the radio show. or: Glad to hear you enjoyed the radio show.
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4answers
838 views

Use of “elide” --common or esoteric? [closed]

Is the word "elide" a word commonly used by English speakers, or is it a more esoteric word used in law or crossword puzzles?
1
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1answer
4k views

How to use “not that”

I am confuse with the use of 'Not that'. When we say "Not that I like bread, but I don't like to eat more carbohydrate." It means to me that I like bread and I don't like to eat more carbohydrate. Is ...
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2answers
2k views

Pronoun “you” can be omitted as subject in imperative form, what other pronouns can be omitted, when and why?

The pronoun you can be omited as a general rule, but sometimes I’ve seen sentences that should have used I or it as the subject but it was omitted.
4
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1answer
432 views

What do you call a past participle+noun construction clause such as “No offense meant” “Your point taken,” “With that said,” and “Given that”?

In reference to my question about the usage of “No offense meant/taken,” I noticed that there are a lot of shortened forms like “No offense meant/taken,” “Your point taken,” “That said,” and “Given ...
11
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4answers
2k views

Is there a name for the practice of dropping pronouns in written speech?

I’m specifically thinking about emails I receive all day where someone will write: Haven’t seen it yet. Will respond when received. If it were spoken, we would certainly hear: I haven’t seen ...
41
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4answers
25k views

Why is the subject omitted in sentences like “Thought you'd never ask”?

"Thought you'd never ask" is "I thought you'd never ask" with "I" omitted. "Hope this helps" is "I hope this helps" with "I" omitted. In English grammar, normally every sentence should have a subject,...
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3answers
2k views

Meaning of “just about everybody else has” in this context

— I ever tell you how much she depends on you? — I ever tell you what an asshole you are? — Nah. But that's okay, just about everybody else has. They both laughed. Is it "...everybody else has ...