Questions tagged [conversation]

For questions related to natural spoken conversations. Please use the dialogue tag for authored or scripted conversations

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3answers
95 views

How to answer cheers?

I occasionally have meetings with my supervisor. When the meeting finishes, my supervisor says: "cheers". I don't know how to answer that. What is a natural respond to that? How do native speakers ...
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1answer
37 views

I would like + please

I received an email with the below sentence: -He gives a talk and then I and anyone else interested can discuss with him afterward. In response to the above sentence, can I write the below sentence ...
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2answers
55 views

Response to “Excuse me” when some one wants to pass you [duplicate]

It has happened to me a lot that when I am searching for an item in aisle in a supermarket and somebody says "excuse me" and passes me. What is a natural response to excuse myself here? What should ...
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2answers
50 views

response to thank you after helping [closed]

I kept a door for somebody to pass and he said: "thank you". What should I say in response? I said: "no problem!". But I am not sure my response was the best one.
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3answers
57 views

Using “Excuse me, …” for asking questions

It has happened to me a lot that I stop random people in the street for asking a question about direction. I said "Excuse me". In answer to my "excuse me" People usually say "Hey". I am wondering if I ...
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1answer
60 views

Where should a period be placed when a sentence ends in a word that is meant to be copied exactly? [closed]

Where should a period be placed when a sentence ends in a word that is meant to be copied exactly? Contrived example: Let's say that my friend is house-sitting and I want to text them the password to ...
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1answer
49 views

Is having “a past” always refering to a bad history?

If someone has a past, does that always mean a bad history? For example: is it appropriate to say "He is a photographer, with a painter's past" or it would be a bad introduction even in an informal ...
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0answers
28 views

Why do people use present tense when they are quoting someone? [duplicate]

I've heard and used this a lot but was wondering why and is it even correct. When you are in a conversation with your mates and you are telling a story and when you try to quote someone, you say "...
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1answer
121 views

Will/would be able to

My friend: I am ready to go to any country in the world if there's a treatment. Me: There's a hospital in the US – they WOULD/WILL be able to treat this. What's the difference between WOULD BE and ...
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1answer
77 views

How to ask to repeat a phrase?

If voice during phone conversation become gibberish, how to ask a person to repeat last words? I'm living in Cyprus and all local people when speak English just use 'tell me' for this. It this a ...
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1answer
76 views

Would it be possible to respond “Not” if someone ask me that “Do you ~”, or “Did you ~”?

Is it alright that I say just a word "Not." about the question starting with "Do you~?", or "Did you~?"? (Not Are you~?, Were you~?)
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0answers
47 views

How to shout to a stranger 80ft away to let her know that her cards have fallen onto the ground? [closed]

During my recent trip visiting U.S. I noticed a girl's credit card falling onto the ground. She was walking and did not notice this. The girl (maybe ~20 years old) was ~80ft away from me. I tried ...
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2answers
63 views

How would i ask for application process completed succesfully [closed]

We applied to International Revenue Service for obtaining ein for our new established USA based company, filled out and thereafter sent SS-4 form through fax and I need to check out on the phone ...
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1answer
851 views

Synonym for “sure” and “yes please”

When somebody suggests me something (maybe offering me something, or suggesting me for a proposal/plan), and I would like to show my agreement/approval for that. Instead of just saying "sure" or "yes ...
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2answers
87 views

How to say “dulcet” in verbal English (or slang)?

For example, if somebody sitting next to me hummed or sang a song and I want to tell him that his song is dulcet, in a polite but informal manner (or even slang). How can I express that? Should I ...
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1answer
86 views

My wife, I just have the one, is

A: Those are my wives B: Well, my wife, I just have the one, ... This conversation is taken from the series shameless, s07e03, min. 22:47. What is the meaning of the definite article in B's ...
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1answer
2k views

I am your friend. What about you?

I want to offer a friendship, where there is a cultural barrier that I need to respect; And there is a barrier in the other direction too - but less strong. I want to offer the friendship by stating ...
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1answer
98 views

How can I improve my speaking? [closed]

When I speak I use a small vocabulary, even though I know a lot more than that. Those words tend to be vague and boring. I know other alternatives for those words, although it doesn't come out ...
1
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1answer
358 views

How to punctuate rhetorical question in an informal sentence?

I am writing a story where my character says something like, "It's been what? Twenty-five years? since I've seen you". Now, how do I properly punctuate this in my sentence? Do I use ellipses or ...
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1answer
80 views

Can “some couldn't know” be used to console somebody?

A : "Hey pal, I don't think I can go on anymore. I feel people around me are much greater than me. I feel I'm useless and nobody cares about me." B : "Don't worry. It's okay. Some couldn't know." (= ...
1
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1answer
175 views

Word for not insignificant small talk?

From Merriam Webster small talk is defined as "light or casual conversation" However describing a conversation with my parents as small talk would indicate a shallow relationship. Is there a word ...
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0answers
55k views

Best reply to “Have a nice weekend”?

Someone says: "Have a nice weekend!" Which of these replies suits best? Consider saying this to a foreign person, not a friend: "Same to you." "You too." "I wish you, too." Feel free to post if ...
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2answers
119 views

Daily Conversation

John: May I speak to Ali please? Father: _______________________________. Yes, you may Hold on please. Some of my students give number 1 answer. I do not intend to accept number 1 as a valid answer ...
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3answers
1k views

What is the difference between didn’t get to sleep and “toss and turn”? [closed]

I saw this saying in a conversation book: I didn’t get to sleep for two or three hours. Then after that I tossed and turned all night. And I’ve consulted Merriam Webster dictionary. Doesn’t “toss ...
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1answer
2k views

If I were you or if i was you? [duplicate]

I think they both acceptable, but which one you recommend me to use in conversation. If he were/was an elephant. Isn't were sounds too formal/oldfashioned?
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1answer
3k views

Difference between saying basically and essentially?

I've observed that the word "basically" is not appreciated by any of my professors, specifically in the writing context (as opposed to in conversation). Is saying (writing) "essentially" a more ...
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1answer
2k views

What does “Sunny Greetings” mean when starting a conversation?

Recently I met a new friend who uses the message "Sunny Greetings" every time we start a conversation, especially via message. What makes this word "Sunny" becomes appropriate? Will it depend on any ...
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3answers
5k views

What phrase do you use instead of “Nice to meet you” when the two of you have already met but [closed]

I'm not a native English speaker. I would like to know what phrase can be used instead of "Nice to meet you" when the two of you have already met but this just happens to be the first time you ...
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1answer
2k views

what's the difference between “artificial” and “man-made”?

My colleagues and I started a conversation about skiing. I told them about my last year trip to a mountain but unfortunately there wasn't any snow at all. People there managed to make some artificial ...
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1answer
92 views

Does using “most” in conversational English convey use of some statistic or data gathering?

In a conversation someone said the following: Most of the engineers working in the high-tech industry switch jobs for money. I was a little adamant about the use of Most in the above statement. I ...
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2answers
486 views

“I understood her to say” [closed]

‘I did. But when I reached the telephone, he had grown tired of waiting and had rung off. I should never have allowed Miss Wickham to take me away from the house.’ ‘She wanted you to see the big ...
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0answers
586 views

What is this type of non-answer called? [duplicate]

I walk into a store and ask the clerk: "Do you have any diet Dr Pepper?" The clerk answers, "We have regular Dr Pepper." Searching for a description of this type of response, I've found a lot of ...
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0answers
3k views

What would you call “the other party” in a conversation in which you are participating? [duplicate]

The ideal word would be "conversee" but that obviously isn't correct. "Recipient" doesn't feel right either. I suppose "interlocutor" is somewhat better, but that doesn't refer to the "other", in this ...
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1answer
5k views

What's the meaning of “don't make too much trouble for me”

I asked my friend if she likes roujiamou, a popular snack in China, because I was considering to bringing her this as a small gift when we are hanging out tomorrow. She said "I'd like that, but don'...
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2answers
3k views

'I says' in spoken English

Is it popular to use 'I says' in conversations in spoken English? Especially when we talk about the past in the present. "Hey, John do you remember Linda?" "Yeh" "We were talking yesterday and she ...
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1answer
885 views

What is the meaning of “put in” in a conversation [closed]

I have visited Great Britain a while ago, and I communicate often with people from nordic countries, and from all of them I often hear the "put in" when someone don't understand or don't hear ...
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2answers
30k views

It's really nice seeing you. Do native speakers often use this phrase?

My teacher told us that if you want to start a conversation or greeting in a not necessarily formal way you should say the phrase "it's really nice seeing you" after saying hello. Do native English ...
4
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1answer
10k views

How do you respond when someone tells you their parent is deceased? [closed]

Well I'm still in college and I know from one of my friends that another friend's father died when she was young. Now how do I react politely if she tells me that in some situation. "Oh, sorry to hear ...
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2answers
7k views

How to answer when an American asks “Which part of ___ are you from”?

I'm an alien worker here in USA. This happens a lot when I start chit-chatting with a stranger, he/she would ask "Where're you from?" "China" I say. Then chances are the following question would be "...
3
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1answer
1k views

Is it better to write 'I' or 'Me' for the name of a speaker in a dialogue? [duplicate]

What should I choose when I write a conversation? Should I write like this? I: How are you? John: Fine. or like this? Me: How are you? John: Fine.
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1answer
367 views

How should I address this professor in the US?

Realted to this question How should I address a professor in the US? I have a question how to adress the professor in the US in my concrete situation. In the last E-Mails I wrote "Dear professor ..." ...
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1answer
139 views

What to say in-order to stop a long boring conversation? [closed]

Suppose two friends got into an argument which turned out to be an unending debate. And one of them wanted to end it. What are the different ways to express this?
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1answer
2k views

“I'm not fit for public consumption ”

A new girl around me had been hospitalized over the weekend for a non-urgent issue. The same day, I wrote to her that I was available to visit her, to see if she needed any help or something (and if ...
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2answers
580 views

The correct usage of to and in when asking if this is a person's first time in a city [closed]

I'm not sure how to explain this to my student. He is asking which of the following sentences are correct: Is this your first time TO Tokyo? or Is this your first time IN Tokyo? I'm thinking the ...
1
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3answers
18k views

How to reply properly to 'Thank you' [closed]

Consider following situation You are a polite person and you hold a door open for someone that comes immediately after you. He/she says: "Thank You!" What is the correct expression to reply to him/...
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1answer
135 views

punctuation to indicate non-grammatical pause or omission

Is it inappropriate to use an ellipsis to create a conversational pause in a typed sentence, in a situation where it's not appropriate to use a comma or a dash or anything else? There's no grammatical ...
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4answers
184 views

Adjective for a type of conversation where no real information is conveyed but rather the speakers are establishing a connection.

There is an english word (adj) that refers to a type of conversation where no real real information is being conveyed but rather the speakers are establishing a connection. A casual conversation ...
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1answer
121 views

running into someone after vacation

for the question 16, I don't know either using "How was your break?" or "What's going on". And Q20,"what about you?" and "what are you up to?" seem able to use? Could someone explain their usages?
1
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1answer
833 views

“I know you are” as a response to introduction [closed]

I was watching a movie and noticed this sentence used as a response from a person introducing himself/herself. This is quite odd for me as a non-native speaker of the language. Example: Setting: In ...
4
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4answers
363 views

Is there a word for this type of overhearing?

just those snippets of conversations that you're not involved in that you overhear and its not even louder than the rest of their conversation it just stands out to you. I feel like that deserves an ...