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Questions tagged [contractions]

A contraction is a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a word, syllable, or word group, created by omission of internal letters.

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271 views

Exceptions to the rule that AAVE can omit “is” and “are” iff the corresponding form in standard English can be contracted?

According to Wikipedia: Only the forms is and are (of which the latter is anyway often replaced by is) can be omitted; am, was, and were are not deleted. These forms cannot be omitted when ...
2
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2answers
866 views

Is it correct to replace “what does” with “what's”?

I recently came across a sentence in a online publication that used apostrophe-"S" as replacement for "does". I was wondering; is this allowed? I only know "what's" as replacement for "what is". The ...
1
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1answer
1k views

Is there a term for removing contractions?

Is there an English verb for removing contractions from a body of text? Like changing "I wasn't there" to "I was not there".
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2answers
83 views

Use of AMEX, MasterCard, Visa without the word “card”

Do you say my AMEX, my Visa Gold, my MasterCard to mean your credit cards issued by a relevant company? I always take (my) Visa Gold, when I go abroad on holiday. Will you accept AMEX (at a ...
3
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1answer
2k views

Technically, would the contraction “I'm” be a sentence? [duplicate]

Way back in high school, I asked my English teacher a question while we were on the topic of sentence fragments. If the words "I am." make a complete sentence, then would the contraction "I'm" be a ...
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3answers
731 views

Can I use a contraction with names or only with subject pronouns?

I have a doubt. Can I use this contraction? Karen and Tony've got a computer Instead of the full form of have got : Karen and Tony have got a computer Which one should I use? Or, are both ...
3
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2answers
1k views

Can “it's” be used as a question? [duplicate]

In my experience, people say "it's" in place of "it is," but never in the form of a question. I think the question "It's?" sounds awkward, but I'd like to know if it's grammatically correct. Is it? ...
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1answer
88 views

what is the reason ..we say can't? intead of can not [duplicate]

Numerous exceptions r there in English grammar ,why it is so? Like I m still confused between India HAS/HAVE won the match?
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1answer
2k views

Why is it “'s” after Let and before a verb, example “Let's go” or Let's do something"? [duplicate]

We often learn the structure “Let’s do something”, but why it there an apostrophe-s after let and before the verb? Why does we need ’s in this structure? Does ’s means is or does it mean was?
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1answer
3k views

Is the contraction of “and”, “'n'”, capitalized in a title?

Should it be, for example, "Fish 'n' Chips", or "Fish 'N' Chips"?
3
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0answers
98 views

Contraction of 'Am I not'? [duplicate]

To the best of my understanding the correct contraction of "Am I not" is "aren't I". However, growing up in Scotland I very frequently heard an alternative contraction "amn't I". I think this though ...
2
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3answers
461 views

Why did common contractions become common?

Examples: Real life isn't like that, y'know. Y'all are awesome. I dunno why. Where'd you go? This is my theory: these phrases/sentences have been said so many times that people felt ...
16
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4answers
1k views

Why can I contract *across* a word, skipping the word in the middle? [duplicate]

I wrote this sentence: Why wouldn't it be valid? --and I realized that without the contraction it becomes: Why would it not be valid? As opposed to "why would not it be valid," as the ...
2
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2answers
5k views

What is the English term for a word meaning a shortened/contracted version of itself? [duplicate]

I remember being taught this by my Literature teacher in school long ago but I can't remember the actual term, maybe complicated sounding like 'onomatopoeia'. I don't mean apostrophes e.g. wouldn't. ...
1
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1answer
132 views

Has there ever been “ 'tis ” in AmE?

'Tis is the contraction of it is. I heard that it was contracted due to the way it's pronounced--the accent; because the accent is at the T. So, just wondering if American English uses this 'tis, ...
4
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1answer
438 views

Correct usage of *'ve contractions

Coincidentally over the last few days, I have twice seen what I view as an 'incorrect' use of I've, viz. How could I've done this better? On attempting to explain why this sounds wrong to a ...
0
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1answer
729 views

Can “you've” be used as a possessive “have”? [duplicate]

Generally, "you've" is used in conjunction with another verb, such as "I see you've arrived" or "She asked if you've seen this". Is it also acceptable to use "you've" without a second verb, using the ...
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2answers
13k views

Contraction of “There are” to “There're” [duplicate]

I'm a soon published author going through my final edit of the book and I got stuck thinking about this one. I understand that when writing this you should type in "There are". When people are saying ...
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3answers
9k views

It seems natural to say “who'd've” in speech, but is this incorrect?

It definitely seems strange in writing. All of the following make sense: who would have who'd have who would've But what about this? who'd've
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6answers
8k views

Etymology of “let us” and “let's”

The verb let means “allow”, “permit”, “not prevent or forbid”, “pass, go or come” and it's used with an object and the bare infinitive. Are you going to let me drive or not? Don't let him ...
0
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1answer
25k views

Is it correct to shorten “you have” to “you've”? [closed]

If "you are" can be shortened to "you're", can "you have" be shortened to "you've"? Is it acceptable? If yes, what are the situations where it can be used?
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2answers
579 views

apostrophes and possession [duplicate]

So I was taught that I should use apostrophes when something possesses something else, but I'm not sure about the use of it's in the following situation: ...and they found their way to a castle. ...
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1answer
2k views

Why do we say won't instead of willn't? [duplicate]

If won't is the contraction of will not, where did the "wo" come from in won't? Why is this convention over willn't?
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1answer
417 views

Is there a contraction known as the're?

Recently, one of my relatives started studying the English Language and she came to discuss that the contraction of there are can also be written as the're because that's they way she learnt it at ...
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2answers
2k views

“I'd done…” vs “I had done…”

Is the former less common for native English speakers because it kinda sound like I done? I'm basing this assumption on Ngrams. But I may be wrong. Example sentences: Plus, I was ashamed to admit, ...
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1answer
7k views

Bob's vs. Bobs? [closed]

Many of my friends use an apostrophe-S after a proper noun to conjoin the word with the word is. For example: "Bob's angry today." This does not make sense to me. I know that an apostrophe can be ...
0
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1answer
111 views

Contraction Rampage [duplicate]

I don't see this getting used quite often, but is it alright to use chain contractions in essays, reports, letters, documents, etc.? I shouldn't've'd eaten that doughnut. They'll've a ...
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1answer
216 views

Different ways of using <pronoun> + 'd + <verb> [closed]

I'm sorry the title makes little sense but I don't know how to phrase it differently. In a sentence like When I was a kid, I'd go to school every morning the 'd stands for I used to, right? But ...
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2answers
359 views

the slang contraction of “what'd he” as in the sentence “what'd he come at you with”

What is the slang contraction of "What'd he" as in the sentence "What'd he come at you with"? "What'd he" is already a contraction but I mean in the same manner like whatcha = what're you=what've you, ...
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3answers
438 views

Was “Do not you want to know…” correct 200 years ago, and is now incorrect?

"Do not you want to know who has taken it?'' cried his wife impatiently. -Pride and Prejudice (1813) According to one of the answers in Is "Don't you know? " the same as "Do ...
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1answer
255 views

Why are many English contractions considered okay to use in contraction-form, but believed to “sound wrong” when used individually? [duplicate]

Some popular examples: Don't you know any better? Now use that with out the contractions: Do not you know any better? Want to bet that many English speakers would find this weird or wrong sounding?...
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0answers
77 views

Using “it's” instead of “it is” [duplicate]

I like the way contractions operate and I know the difference between "it's" and "its" based on contraction and possession. That is, "it's = it is" and "its" is possessive. However, there are some ...
3
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2answers
210 views

Contractions of “have” in the sense of “to possess”

I see this usage frequently on various SE sites: I've an [object] This usage of "I've" seems very strange [edit: archaic or poetic] to me as a native speaker of US English. I'm accustomed to only ...
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10answers
21k views

Grammatically correct sentence where “you're” and “your” can be interchanged? [closed]

Most grammar checkers are capable of detecting the the misuse of "your" and "you're"; providing the necessary correction. I'm curious though, is there any sentence that can be constructed where ...
20
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2answers
1k views

Space before apostrophe

In the 1928 Scribner’s (NY) edition of The Plays of J. M. Barrie, I’ve noticed an odd convention: where a contraction happens in middle of a word (e.g., “don’t” for “do n(o)t”), the apostrophe has the ...
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2answers
198 views

Can “very” (and its synonyms") mean less intense? [closed]

I recently found something mildly intriguing. Very should mean more than the following adjective. This room is dark Means that it is casually dark if you will. While This room is very dark ...
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1answer
980 views

’Tis the season

Google has a new doodle that says ’Tis the season when you put your cursor on it: What is the origin of this usage? or even the contraction ’tis? Details: There is a popular carol called “Deck the ...
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5answers
14k views

Why do not we ask negative questions without a contraction on the not after the verb?

I have found multiple questions touching on this but not a single one that has a comprehensive answer. The information is all there but in little bits. "Do you not" vs. "Don't you&...
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1answer
10k views

Using a name as a contraction with “is”, syntax looks possessive?

"Bob is fat." Would it be proper to do "Bob's fat."? To me, this looks possessive, as if we're talking about his fat rather than using "fat" as an adjective. What's the proper way to do this? "Bob ...
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1answer
136 views

How do you form the plural of an elided/contracted noun?

The noun, without elision, is "beatings". Singular, elided, is "beatin'" (note the apostrophe). So what's the plural? I considered "beatins'" (note the apostrophe) and "beatin's" but neither of them ...
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1answer
797 views

Is there a rule for abbreviating is to 's?

Sometimes, we abbreviate sentences like "Nobody is ready" to "Nobody's ready". Is there a rule about this, and is "Nobody's ready" correct or is this considered incorrect? My apologies if this was ...
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2answers
2k views

Using contractions in questions

I am very sure about the use of contractions in positive and negative sentences. But I am not sure about their use in questions. I've seen many examples of the use of contractions in questions, but I ...
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1answer
427 views

Usage of “tum” in English speaking countries, other than the UK

I'm sure I've heard tummy used in American English and the English spoken in commonwealth countries as a sort of euphemism for stomach. I'm not sure so much how common it is to hear it reduced to tum, ...
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1answer
212 views

History of assimilation for going to be

When did the assimilation of going to be into gonna be start being used?
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0answers
68 views

When is it acceptable to use “I've” by itself? [duplicate]

I have a friend from a foreign country who for years has used "I've" in a way that sounds funny to me. He often writes sentences like "I've an exam tomorrow." Is he correct in this usage? I have ...
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2answers
2k views

Are what-cha and arent-cha examples of elision?

Are these words examples of elision? What effect do they create? If a child says them what does this suggest about their language development? Thanks for any help!!
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2answers
853 views

I know “of” sounds like “ov”. Does “I've” sound like “If”?

I was studying connected speech and I read when we say for example I've finished my homework we pronounce the 've and f in finished as only one sound. Is it only in this case or whenever I use ...
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2answers
4k views

Contraction [SUBJECT] + is with proper noun ending in s?

The possessive form (the car of Jesus) would be Jesus' car. If we say Jesus is 11. Would it also be Jesus' 11? Jesus's 11?
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1answer
2k views

Contractions: Are “I would’ve” and “I’d have” both equally permissible?

Instead of “I would have done something”, are both of these versions ok? I would’ve done something. I’d have done something.
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1answer
9k views

When did “ain't” become slang?

In Anthony Trollope's The Way We Live Now, there are several places where "ain't" is used instead of "am not", such as: "I ain't afraid of him, if you mean that," continued Lord Nidderdale. — ...