Questions tagged [contraction-vs-full-form]

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Do you have to change the order of the words when not using an apostrophe? [duplicate]

For example: Didn't you like the opera? Did not you like the opera? Did you not like the opera? Which one, (1) or (2), is correct and why?
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1 answer
38 views

Sentence-final contractions [duplicate]

There are some pieces of inflection like the genitive marker that can attach to phrases (cf. [The man in the hall]’s taste in wallpaper is appalling) and so they sometimes behave like a contraction. ...
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2 votes
0 answers
62 views

When is the "t" pronounced in won’t, don’t, can’t?

I am a speaker of Canadian English. I have noticed that when people pronounce won’t, don’t, and can’t, often when speaking normally, they don’t release the “t”, as in connected speech. The standard ...
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2 answers
177 views

Can someone respond to a question by just saying "I´ll" instead of "I will"? Why or why not? [duplicate]

My friend keeps on responding to questions by just saying "I´ll". This doesn´t seem grammatically correct to me. However I would like to know what would be the proper use of that contraction....
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-4 votes
1 answer
292 views

‘Twas good until ‘twasn’t

Since society generally seems to want 2 condense & abbreviate the English language, why don’t we use the words “‘twas” and “‘twasn’t” (which is not even a recognized word, btw!!) more often than ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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is "weren't you..." considered grammatically correct? Because expanded, it would translate to "were not you..." [duplicate]

Same with "wouldn't you..." because it would directly mean "would not you..." If the goal is to communicate "would you not" or "were you not," is this a legitimate structure? Example: Weren't you ...
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1 answer
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Why does the ' in "it's" matter?

I understand that it shows that there is a contraction. This is helpful for understanding for neologism-like contractions, but the contraction of "it is" is so common you just read it the same as its ...
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1 answer
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Why isn't there "is" in "They did it, thinking it more glamorous than..."?

Could you please help me with the grammar of this sentence? It's from an essay in a book on IELTS by Cambridge University Press. People turn to buying the new brand from overseas nations, perhaps ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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HAVE (negation, contraction)

Why is (1) considered correct, but not (2) ? (1) This would have been such had it not been for... (2) This would have been such hadn't it been for... P.S.: Besides, should there be commas as ...
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0 votes
1 answer
406 views

Can the contracted form of "will" be used after "and"?

Is it correct to write: hope you enjoyed the demo and'll consider the idea Or I must all the way use the entire word for "will" in that phrase? Thank you in advance for clarifications
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2 answers
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Is ‘don't do’ ungrammatical/redundant? How about ‘don't <verb>’?

‘Don't’ is a contraction of ‘do not’, and ‘do’ is a verb meaning ‘to perform/execute’. Strictly speaking, then, are these two common constructions ungrammatical? a) ‘Don't do this/that.’ Since it ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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Why isn’t “It’s” a complete sentence, but “It is” is? [duplicate]

I’m a native English speaker, so I understand that It’s. is not a complete sentence, whereas the sentence It is. is a complete sentence. What linguistic mechanism prevents “It’s.” from being ...
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What’s the difference between "cannot" and "can’t"? [duplicate]

Can anyone explain the difference between cannot and can’t is? Is the only difference that cannot is more formal than can’t is?
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3 votes
3 answers
16k views

Is 'Night an acceptable informal variant of "Good Night"?

The spoken use of "night" as an informal, familiar version of "good night" (wishing one a restful sleep) is common, but I'm not sure what the proper written equivalent is - if there is one. I have ...
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1 answer
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Creating a contraction with the words "adjustment has" [closed]

Which would be the best way to correct this sentence? "An adjustments been made to your account." Is it correct to add an apostrophe ("an adjustment's been made")? Or should the long version be used ...
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1 answer
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"Isn't that..." expanding to "Is not that..." [duplicate]

My question is whether the use of "isn't" in sentences of the form "Isn't she lovely?" a rule, or an exception to a rule? Because if you expand the contraction out, then you have &...
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3 answers
112 views

Is this(apostrophe plus is)a contraction? What is the original form?

What is the uncontracted equivalent of ' is (apostrophe plus is) in the sentence, “Aye, when he comes into 'is money, like” in the following? If it is “it is,” what does “it” refer to? Does “it” ...
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3 votes
2 answers
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Contraction of "I was"?

Is there a contraction for "I was"? There are contractions for "I am" (I'm), "I will" (I'll), "I have" (I've), "I would" (I'd), and yet the simple past tense seems conspicuously missing. Why is ...
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14 votes
6 answers
4k views

Is there a case where "of the clock" is more appropriate then "o'clock"?

In formal papers, I've always been told to avoid contractions, but unlike "do not" versus "don't", I don't think that I have ever heard "of the clock" spoken aloud. Is there a case (aside from time ...
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1 answer
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appropriate usage of I am / I'm [duplicate]

I am trying to explain to someone why the following quote should use "I am" rather than "I'm": I don't care how old I'm, I still like [media] I feel that I am correct, but cannot recall the rule.
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1 vote
1 answer
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Is there a term for removing contractions?

Is there an English verb for removing contractions from a body of text? Like changing "I wasn't there" to "I was not there".
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1 vote
1 answer
490 views

"Why aren't I afraid?" [duplicate]

I came across this sentence in an e book. "Why aren't I afraid?" Is this the proper way to phrase the question?
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0 votes
2 answers
688 views

the slang contraction of "what'd he" as in the sentence "what'd he come at you with"

What is the slang contraction of "What'd he" as in the sentence "What'd he come at you with"? "What'd he" is already a contraction but I mean in the same manner like whatcha = what're you=what've you, ...
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7 votes
3 answers
523 views

Was "Do not you want to know..." correct 200 years ago, and is now incorrect?

"Do not you want to know who has taken it?'' cried his wife impatiently. -Pride and Prejudice (1813) According to one of the answers in Is "Don't you know? " the same as "Do ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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Is there a rule for abbreviating is to 's?

Sometimes, we abbreviate sentences like "Nobody is ready" to "Nobody's ready". Is there a rule about this, and is "Nobody's ready" correct or is this considered incorrect? My apologies if this was ...
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2 answers
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Using contractions in questions

I am very sure about the use of contractions in positive and negative sentences. But I am not sure about their use in questions. I've seen many examples of the use of contractions in questions, but I ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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Contractions: Are “I would’ve” and “I’d have” both equally permissible?

Instead of “I would have done something”, are both of these versions ok? I would’ve done something. I’d have done something.
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11 votes
3 answers
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Expanding a contraction, where the expansion is not as it would seem

Consider these two sentences, one with a contraction, one without: I didn't check my voicemail. I did not check my voicemail. didn't is expanded to did not. Now consider: Why didn't you ...
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0 votes
2 answers
268 views

"I'd chase him down" vs. "I had to chase him down"

I was reading an article and I encountered this sentence: Sometimes the warchief target would run off and I'd chase him down a field for longer than I care to admit. To me, if I remove the ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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is there any difference between "you'd" and "you would" in the meaning?

As in the title, is there any difference between the following sentences? You'd better put your results to another place. You would better put your results to another place. And, when do I use any ...
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10 votes
4 answers
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Can you say "are not we all?" instead of "aren't we all?"

Because "aren't" translates to "are not" I pose the question, can you use both interchangeably (in the context of "aren't we all?")? "Are not" sounds very grammatically incorrect in this situation. ...
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19 votes
3 answers
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Can the "don't" contraction be expanded when used as a command?

I refer to the usage of "don't" as an imperative to tell someone what not to do. As in, Hey! Don't you dare touch that button! When it is used in the interrogative or as part of a statement, "don'...
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5 votes
4 answers
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Can "let us" always be used in place of "let's"?

Me: Perhaps we need to make a left turn at Albuquerque Him: Let us try that Now I would have said, "Let's try that". "Let us" sounds wrong to me in this instance. Is it? Are there contractions ...
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3 votes
2 answers
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When is it ok to create a contraction of words followed by “s”?

When is it correct to create a contraction of words followed by is? For instance is who’s a correct short form of who is?
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13 votes
6 answers
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Is "Don't you know? " the same as "Do not you know?"?

Well, we know don't is the same as do not, right? Therefore, can I say "Do not you know?", instead of "Don't you know?"? Well, I know that chances are I can't do that, but technically that should be ...
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12 votes
7 answers
210k views

"There are so many" vs. "There is so many"

There are so many questions on this website. There is so many questions on this website. The former "sounds right," but the contracted form of the latter does as well: There's so many ...
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15 votes
4 answers
138k views

"Do you not" vs. "Don't you"

I live in the UK and I mostly hear people saying Don't you..., but some people say: Do you not...? What is the difference and which one is more correct? You can put any example really. Something like:...
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17 votes
2 answers
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Do contractions (e.g. "don't") and full phrases (e.g. "do not") have the same meaning?

What is the difference between "don't" and "do not" in the English literature as well as spoken English? Are they same? The same question goes for "wouldn't" and "would not", "couldn't" and "could ...
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52 votes
6 answers
39k views

Is there some rule against ending a sentence with the contraction "it's"?

I heard this lyric in a song the other day and it just sounded so wrong that I assumed it must be incorrect grammar, but I can't find any specific prohibition that applies. That's what it's. That ...
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