Questions tagged [construction]

symbolic units that connect a linguistic form with meaning

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0
votes
1answer
44 views

It is not + noun + to infinitive

I do know an adjective (without a noun) in this construction can be followed by a to-infinitive, as in: It is not acceptable to kill a goat in that way. It is not good to kill him here. But, is it ...
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4answers
130 views

Is it OK to use “if” at the end of a sentence? [closed]

Is it OK to use "if" at the end of a sentence? e.g. I saw a professor once saying: They can withdraw the paper you don't go to the conference if.
3
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3answers
568 views

What's different between the two sentences?

Hey, I'm watching a TV show, and there's a sentence: I knew giving you that book was gonna come back and bite me in the ass. Can I change it to: I know gave you that book was gonna come back ...
1
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1answer
110 views

Overthinking “…expect there to be…”

This sentence struck me as odd when I casually said it in conversation: I expect there to be bears. ...meaning I wanted [sarcastically] bears in the cave we were planning on exploring. What ...
11
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2answers
26k views

Difference between “subsequently” and “consequently”?

When studying and reading course material in "softer" sciences that are descriptive the word "subsequently" appears in a way like "and subsequently" ...what does it mean, disctinct from "consequently" ...
5
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7answers
1k views

verb or adjective in “The blue page is *stapled* to the red page”?

Consider the following sentence. The blue page is stapled to the red page. Although "stapled" is (apparently) past-tense, nonetheless the above sentence is clearly expressing something about the ...
0
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2answers
84 views

what is the structure of this sentence?

I cannot grasp the structure of this sentence. Natural selection will tend to maximize r for the environment in which the species lives, for any mutation or gene combination which increases the ...
4
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4answers
419 views

What is the proper term for etching or digging of wall to hide conduit of cables

I am creating a scope of work and I can't seem to find the right term to say... (including context) Contractor should provide in wall conduit. If no in wall conduit is available, contractor should ...
2
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0answers
19 views

Omitting will in “if-will-sentence” [duplicate]

My daughter is learning if-sentences in school right now.They learned that the rule for type I sentences is "if-clause: Simple Present, main clause: will-future or (Modal + infinitive)" How does the ...
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1answer
399 views

Selective with/in/about [closed]

I need to find out which preposition is more suitable for the sentence below; "Could we not just be selective with/in/about our potential themes." Thanks!
3
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3answers
320 views

Why can 'X as well as Y' be written as 'as well X as Y'?

Prof. Brooks Landon, U. Iowa, Ph.D., U. Texas at Austin, Building Great Sentences: How to Write the Kinds of Sentences You Love to Read (Great Courses), 2013, p 193:         ...
1
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1answer
37 views

Which phrase sounds better( more natural and common for native speaker).“ Victim of art”

I have doubts about the phrase "Victim of art". Should I change it to "Art victim" or it can be used as it is but may be I miss articles? Or, please, suggest your own version with the same sense. ...
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1answer
819 views

Threat on/to/for

As I was writing a sentence, it struck me that I am not all that quite sure about the noun 'threat', and how a sentence using the words 'threat' and 'cause' can be constructed. For instance: "...
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0answers
27 views

Now we live in a well-ordered society

Context from a video: After Moses led the Israelites out of Egypt, God decreed the laws and commandments, which guided the Israelites' life on earth and taught people how to worship God. These laws ...
0
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1answer
5k views

What's the correct response to “would you care to…”?

I was asked, "would you care to grab coffee sometime?" and didn't know how to correctly respond to it. Obviously I could respond with a "yes, sounds great" or a "no, thanks", but what would a parallel ...
0
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1answer
39 views

a-verb-ing construct (e.g. a-hopping) [closed]

I sometimes here casual phrases in English like a hipping and a hopping (a hippin and a hoppin). How exactly does this fit into English grammar and what is the history of the construct?
3
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3answers
7k views

“Attached {is/are} X, Y and Z.” If X, Y and Z are all singular, is it correct to use “is” here?

Which is correct? Attached are our compensation plan, an independent contract agreement, and a W9. Attached is our compensation plan, an independent contract agreement, and a W9. I thought because ...
0
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1answer
50 views

Can you help me understand the construction of this sentence? [closed]

Can you help me identify the individual components of this sentence, please? Asking askers asking askers asking. I realise the second occurrence of asking is a verb, however, I am unclear on the ...
1
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1answer
1k views

Have someone/ something do something (not the usual meaning)

Have someone do something usually means asking a subordinate or a qualified worker etc to do something. But I keep coming across this construction, only with what seems to be a different meaning. I'd ...
0
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1answer
47 views

Is the construction “as… also” grammatically correct?

I came across the following sentence: "Every element of visual data can be viewed as in 3D also in 2D" Is it correct to use here the construction "as...also..."?
1
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1answer
63 views

Preposition followed by pronoun and noun phrase

I am reading Scrivener's Plain Introduction to textual analysis, written in 1874, and was surprised by the following construction : It was presented to the University by Theodore Beza, for whom and ...
2
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2answers
4k views

Is this a positive or negative sentence?

I heard a sentence like this: How will Bill ever know that? Can someone tell me if this is a positive or negative sentence and what are the guidelines to decide which it is?
3
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2answers
562 views

Negating a clause

This is my first post, I really like this site! Basically I have problems to distinguish the negation of a verb that is applied to a clause, and a verb that is applied to a negation of a clause. The ...
1
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1answer
11k views

When do you use “what'd you say” and when do you use “what d'you say”?

In informal writing you can say: "What'd you say" or "what d'you say?" When do you choose the former or the latter? Which one is more common?
4
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2answers
370 views

Why the construction “They it was who…” is grammatically correct?

I just came across the following sentence on Olaf Stapledon's Star Maker: They it was who controlled our whole adventure... I have the impression this a rather archaic, yet valid, construction. A ...
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2answers
111 views

What is the difference between “Human brain” and “Human's brain” [duplicate]

Many times i get confused whether i should use 's with a noun or not. For example: Engine parts or Engine's parts Human brain or Human's brain Wordpress plugin or Wordpress' plugin Computer program ...
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3answers
2k views

Criteria used to determine if a “Chinese inch” is an “inch”?

This is a follow-on question to "Term for construct in which adjective completely changes the meaning of its following noun?" Is a "Chinese inch" an "inch" or something entirely different in which ...
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1answer
503 views

“How many girls did you ask their name for?”

Is this question grammatically sound? It sounds slightly weird to me, and not sure if it can be paraphrased. Could somebody clarify please?
6
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2answers
5k views

Question regarding the usage of “Bang”

Can anyone shed some light on the origin of the use of the word "Bang" to imply a positive adjective? For example, here are three colloquial phrases which use the word bang to lend strength to the ...
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1answer
102 views

“What has X got to do with Y” - how come this “wordy” construction survived thus far? [closed]

When someone is wondering how two things may be related to each other, they will probably say "what has X got to do with Y?". This utterance uses simple words, with no words specific to the idea of ...
3
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2answers
289 views

Who is Greek president vs Who is THE Greek President

I saw this in a quiz on Stuff: Who is Greek president? Surely the word "the" should be in there somewhere? But I get the feeling I've heard things like "US President Barack Obama" instead of "The ...
106
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9answers
10k views

Is there a word for a person with only one head?

Reading this article by the fantastic Douglas Adams I came across this interesting quote: ‘[I]nteractivity’ is one of those neologisms that Mr Humphrys likes to dangle between a pair of verbal ...
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1answer
517 views

I'm comparing two sentences. What version of these sentences looks Ok for you? [closed]

Please compare two sentences. Which version is correct? 1)"This place is an opportunity to take a rest in THE uniqueness OF THE local nature where you can feel Russian hospitality." 2)"You will have ...
3
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1answer
243 views

Is this construction correct? “Today is [(pro)noun] [gerund]”

"Today is [(pro)noun] [gerund]" Context: Some time ago, my friend and I were messaging each other and then I used this construction. He immediately said that my sentence should've been "Today [(pro)...
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5answers
2k views

What's the reason for using the ‘passive voice’? [closed]

I would like to know the why and when the 'passive voice' is used instead of the 'active voice' in English. The following definition did not help me very much. passive voice the voice used ...
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3answers
10k views

Is this proper usage of “through which?” How can I best construct this sentence?

I'm looking to describe this image, which is attached to a post I'm writing about. http://imgur.com/a/Fu4yy The following sentence is my attempt. "Attached is an image of a Bluepoint Brewery Rastafa ...
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1answer
117 views

Different verbs in comparing dergee of intent/feeling/etc

Sometimes people compare degree of something (an intent/feeling/etc) by giving completely unrelated example (by using "same way as" or "like"). Is something like "The boy wants that bicycle like a ...
19
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3answers
3k views

A term describing the replacement of a specific word in a saying with one that ryhmes

I understand this is quite a complicated title, however I have failed to discover a word (or a few words) to adequately describe the creative language used when changing a saying (or well-known phrase)...
5
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6answers
2k views

Can an adverb be a noun?

I have seen this post for the answer to my question, but this is not much help in case of the question I am going to ask. Here is an example sentence - The new design of Twitter profile is more ...
2
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3answers
1k views

“After work at X” or “after finishing work at X” or “after finishing working at X”

After work at the store that day, I took a detour. After finishing work at the store that day, I took a detour. After finishing working at the store that day, I took a detour. Are the ...
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2answers
599 views

Word for the adjective of 'social science'

I'm having trouble wording this sentence: Several groundbreaking clinical and social science breakthroughs were made with the help of ... Social science as a noun can't modify breakthroughs. Is ...
-2
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1answer
400 views

what does “The foregoing limitations …” mean [closed]

Most of the text below is the same as what I already posted in SE law; but I'm looking for what the language might mean, regardless of the various legal aspects (i.e., the Michigan Supreme Court has ...
1
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3answers
2k views

'Participle phrase', 'Participle clause', 'Participle construction'

I am studying in Korean. In my grammar book, below sentences are called 'participle phrase' 1) Seeing police officer, he ran away. 2) Buying it online, you have to use a paypal. 3) Realizing his ...
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1answer
13k views

Root + “-ophone” construction to describe speakers of a language

I've long used the terms anglophone and francophone to describe English and French speakers respectively, but I recently found myself about halfway through a sentence where I needed a similar term for ...
0
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1answer
6k views

Confusion with the phrase 'Under what circumstances'

Below is what is causing me a lot of confusion. Say, I did a test, and will have to redo it if I get below a certain mark, and I want to pose a question asking what mark it is (Or there might be ...
3
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1answer
89 views

Is there a name for the type of shorthand sentence that excludes yourself as the subject? e.g., “Going to the park.”

See this all the time. Doing it right now. Leaving out the "I am" piece of the sentence. Does this have a name?
2
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2answers
870 views

Adverbs in noun phrase coordination

Consider the following example sentence: The ball often hit the tree and never the man. I am trying to represent this sentence as a constituency-based parse tree, but I am having a hard time ...
2
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2answers
6k views

“Was to ” vs “was to have ”

What is the difference in the meaning between following sentences: John was to have picked strawberries yesterday but the downpour made the field too muddy. John was to pick strawberries yesterday ...
0
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1answer
255 views

It saves you endless agony - Correct?

My sentence reads: It may not save you bucks, but, it surely saves you endless agony. Is this correct? Or, do you suggest any alterations?
1
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2answers
90 views

Is there a term for constructions like “he/she”, “his/her”, “yes/no”, etc

I'm referring to a construction in a text where two options are provided, of which only one will be valid in practice. For example: The user has the option to choose his/her own avatar.