Questions tagged [compounds]

Questions about words that are created by combining two or more other words together.

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20 views

Compound nouns vs possessive (of) [duplicate]

Which should I choose: The factory roof or the roof of the factory? Are there some grammar/rules about the difference? What case should I use the first sentence in? What case should I use the second ...
0
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1answer
36 views

Various mails in chain [closed]

Which is more correct to say See mail trail See trail mail I want to know the right sentence to use when writing mail. Some people use mail trail while some use trail mail. It puts me ...
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0answers
63 views

“drinks cans” compound noun [duplicate]

I've met a "drinks cans" compound noun on this webpage. See how food and drinks cans get recycled As I know, there is a specific rule for the plural compound nouns that are made of two nouns. In ...
2
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2answers
78 views

Term for creating a fantasy word from all letters of two existing words?

If I have two words - let's say "lamp" and "vampire" and I put all of their letters together to form a new fantasy word. e.g. "vapamlimper" does this process have a name? I already considered terms ...
2
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2answers
69 views

‘Dog issue’: a compound or a noun phrase?

I’m so confused of the following expression: ‘the hot dog issue’. The dialogue is following: A: Have you heard of the hot dog issue? B: Yes, I have. These days, the dog’s euthanasia problem is very ...
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1answer
49 views

Why is it incorrect to say/write “I want to know today weather” instead of “I want to know today's weather”? [closed]

"'s" indicates possesive case. Although it's absurd to say that "today" owns "weather", possesive case can indicate other relationships too. For example, in "Picasso's paintings" it means "by Picasso" ...
2
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1answer
31 views

“Uploaduser” or “upload user”

I'm working on a product where you can enable an upload user (or uploaduser?) which is a special user that has upload privileges. I'm not a native english speaker and I cannot figure out whether it ...
-1
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1answer
45 views

“A servile propaganda operation”: is the “propaganda operation” collocation leveraged proper in this context?

[...] has ever had at his disposal—a servile propaganda operation.1 I was looking at some ngram for collocations with propaganda and there are many more results with campaign and machine for instance ...
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1answer
29 views

Hyphenated abbreviation of component-sharing compound

In German it is unconspicuous to write 'An- oder Abwesenheit', but writing 'pre- or absence' in English would be conspicuous and perhaps either jocular or affectatious. I cannot think of an example ...
2
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2answers
79 views

Beesting or bee sting

A friend made a typo when writing "bee sting" and wrote "beesting" but apparently this is also a word according to Merriam-Webster. Does anyone actually use "beesting" if so, is it a result of some ...
6
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3answers
985 views

“Fish and chips shop” or “fish and chip shop”?

When referring to a restaurant specializing in fish and chips would you call it a fish and chip shop or a fish and chips shop?
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1answer
58 views

What part of speech is the word hair in 'hair spray'? [duplicate]

Consider the following sentence as an example. I used some hair spray. What part of speech is hair? Intuitively, I want to say it's an adjective modifying spray since hair spray is two separate words ...
1
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1answer
29 views

“Personal Use Program” or “Personal-Use Program”?

Help me settle a discussion on this topic. Everywhere I look, within my company's internal documents as well as documents from other companies, a "personal use" program is not hyphenated. A colleague ...
2
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2answers
83 views

Plural or single with compound objects

Suppose you want to say something like There are two crates, having three and one balls respectively. How to say this correctly? Is it ‘…one balls’ or ‘three balls and one ball’, or something ...
1
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1answer
63 views

Mishearing something overheard

Consider the following situation: A & B are having a conversation. C overhears it. Either A or B says something C considers controversial. C later speaks about this in private, but has misheard. ...
16
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2answers
1k views

Why is it gerontology and not geronology?

I hope this is the right place to ask this, if not please give a feedback. According to the Wikipedia, the term gerontology is made up from two parts, geron and -logia, which mean respectively "old ...
2
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0answers
38 views

“Testbed” or “test bed”? [duplicate]

"A testbed is a platform for conducting rigorous, transparent, and replicable testing of scientific theories, computational tools, and new technologies" (Wikipedia). While Wikipedia seems to prefer "...
0
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1answer
421 views

“everywhere” vs. “anywhere” vs. “somewhere”

Which one is correct to use? We usually stay home because it's more comfortable than go everywhere/anywhere/somewhere
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2answers
142 views

Proper use of “forward out”

I want to use "Forward out" to indicate that no matter which port messages are sent out they always arrive at the same destination. Are the following sentences grammatically correct and serve the ...
3
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1answer
128 views

So there is no solid rule to form PLURAL COMPOUND NOUNS right? Why say “gumball machine” but “securities dealer”?

In the dictionary, a security (FINANCE, STOCK MARKET): a financial investment such as a bond or share that is traded on a financial market a securities agreement/audit/dealer a ...
0
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1answer
39 views

In which grammatical number should the first word in a compound be? [duplicate]

I've recently caught myself spending too much time wondering about several off-sounding compounds I've come across, e.g. browsers list (as in, a list of browsers) and tasks queue (as in, a queue of ...
1
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1answer
67 views

“-field” joining rule for compound words?

Is there a rule when to join a word with field and when to leave them as two separate words? Examples: I walked through a cornfield. I walked through a maize field. I walked through a ...
0
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1answer
70 views

Dash after the prefix “non”

Is the hyphen that we often see in words such as "non-zero", "non-trivial", etc. optional? In case the answer is negative, is there any rule of thumb on which one may rely in order to recall when ...
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1answer
23 views

Client and server side componets

I'm having a problem to refer to the components that are in both, the client-side and the server-side. I started writing: "client and server-side components" (1) I did that in order to avoid ...
1
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1answer
184 views

Is there a term for an equivocal compound e.g. “guinea pig”

"Sweetbread," "guinea pig," "shortbread" (a typical Scottish biscuit), "egg cream" (a carbonated drink), and "firefly" are all not what their two nouns claim. A sweetbread is neither sweet nor ...
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3answers
32 views

Term for entering a market with a lower pricing and simpler offer [business] [closed]

There is a term meant to describe the following situation, in business strategy: Suppose there is a market with a few companies acting as a closed oligopoly, with only full-featured and very pricey ...
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0answers
50 views

What is the verb portion of a hyphenated/compound/multiword adjective or noun called?

For example, in the noun "victim-blaming", what is the "blaming" part called? Is it some special type of verb, or perhaps something else? Words of this form can generally be made up and can still be ...
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1answer
74 views

Compound Adjectives: Usage after “is” / Usage with noun

I'm currently writing a text in which I have some object called a graph, which has the attribute of being planar in a special way, namely in the multi-level way. I'm pretty certain that I should call ...
2
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1answer
159 views

The use of “vicinity”

The noun "vicinity" is used with the preposition "in" before it and sometimes with "of" after it: There are a few hotels in the vicinity. There is a good shop in the vicinity of the station. ...
7
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7answers
2k views

I am a pansexual trans/gender-fluid person

There's a risk of me potentially offending someone but I am an outsider trying to get to grips with this terminology. Online, I read someone who identified themself as a pansexual trans/gender-...
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0answers
38 views

sentence identification

What are these sentences ? The moors, which were covered in heather, appeared mystical under the gray mist. My favorite type of food is Japanese, especially sushi, I wish I knew how to make it myself ...
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1answer
35 views

Which is more correct: “two- or three-note riff” or “two-or-three-note riff”?

When I read "two- or three-note riff," I sense an emphasis on the riff containing two notes with an occasional third note; whereas, a two-or-three-note riff seems to mean either or. Am I reading too ...
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3answers
102 views

Trade marks or trademarks?

What is the correct format to use when referring to trademarks in British English? Is "trademarks" generally preferable? I've seen both used in different contexts, the UK GOV page uses "trade marks", ...
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2answers
196 views

Intelligent-intensive or Intelligence-intensive?

Which of the titular phrases is the most appropriate and correct to express a work or task that mainly relies on the intelligence of an entity? Stats of matches from Google Books: Intelligent-...
0
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1answer
81 views

Hyphen in compound word?

Better with or without hyphen? Dollar-quotes Use dollar-quoted strings to simplify! Use dollar-quoting to simplify! Does it matter whether the second part is another noun? And does it make a ...
1
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1answer
52 views

Why it is “Okun's Law” and “Philips Curve” rather than “Okun Law” and “Philips' Curve”? [duplicate]

How exactly do these kinds of compound words work? "Okun's Law" and "Philips Curve" rather than "Okun Law" and "Philips' Curve"? Is there any grammar book I can look for?
5
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3answers
114 views

Is there a word for confusing words like 'everyday' with phrases like 'every day'?

I see people confusing words that are compounded from two words with a phrase made from those words. This is easy to do, as they look and sound very similar: For example: "everyday", an adjective, ...
2
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1answer
73 views

Two-word verbs described with One-word nouns

I've noticed that certain (compound?) verbs are combined into one word when the process is used as a noun. It seems to generally be processes with a preposition in them. If the noun isn't combined ...
0
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1answer
50 views

Why is the sentence “millennial-tinged”?

I recently came upon with a sentence: In her office at Oxford University Press, Paton was drafting a brand new entry for the Oxford English Dictionary. Also in her in-tray when I visited were the ...
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0answers
64 views

Is “a-okay” acceptable in lowercase?

Interestingly, Merriam-Webster has an entry for "A-OK" but not for "A-okay." Most other dictionaries I have referenced have an entry for "A-okay" including Oxford Living Dictionaries, dictionary.com,...
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1answer
79 views

Hyphenation in compounds with abbreviation remarks

So far I understood, that hyphenation should aid readability. Examples [1, 2]: North America-based company A Gaussian mixture model-based approach We propose spherical Gaussian-based ...
7
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2answers
6k views

“Filepath” or “file path”? [closed]

A path, the general form of the name of a file or directory, specifies a unique location in a file system. "Filename" is a compound, but how about "filepath"/"file path"? "Filepath" seems incorrect ...
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1answer
5k views

“Try and get some rest” OR “Try to get some rest”? [duplicate]

Which sentence is grammatically correct? Try and get some rest (or) Try to get some rest
1
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3answers
334 views

How to correctly hyphenate a phrase with clarifying word in parenthesis

How do I correctly hyphenate this phrase: using a client (browser) initiated session using a client- (browser-) initiated session using a client (browser)-initiated session The session ...
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1answer
66 views

preposition modifying compound object

"The ethical standard is to abstain from sexual intimacies with colleagues or with staff for whom you have supervisory, evaluative, or instructional responsibility." Does the above sentence mean ...
7
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4answers
2k views

What's the plural of “Confirmation of Entry”?

I've recently wondered about the plural of the expression "Confirmation of Entry". A "Confirmation of Entry" is a piece of paper that Cambridge Assessment English gives candidates who are going to ...
0
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1answer
2k views

Feminine form of “god king/emperor”

I'm trying to figure out what the correct feminine forms of "god king" and "god emperor" are. Do I just replace "king" and "emperor" with their feminine equivalents (i.e. "god queen" and "god empress")...
3
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1answer
1k views

What are the two parts to a compound word?

I'm wondering what each word that compromise a compound word is called. For example, You would say: "Life" is the first ____ in "lifetime". There are two ____s in "lifetime". Is the answer I am ...
1
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1answer
246 views

Why is the noun “blacklist” (written without a space) in the dictionary, but not “whitelist”? [closed]

Checking Oxford Dictionaries Online, I find the noun blacklist, written as one word, and the noun white list, written as two. There is no black list defined as a compound written open, and there is no ...
1
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0answers
98 views

How to avoid ambiguity and convey specific meaning in compound names ? (name + name)

There are already other questions regarding compound names (noun + noun) and now I better understand the general rule, which seems to be, unless dealing with an exception, to only make plural one of ...