Questions tagged [compounds]

Questions about words that are created by combining two or more other words together.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2 votes
0 answers
37 views

When do you use hyphens with compound adjectives?

I understand there are numerous questions related to this question but nothing truly clarifies my problem. I have been trying to understand when I should use hyphens in compound adjectives and I seem ...
Benji's user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
2 answers
130 views

Should I hyphenate “Haunted Mansion themed outfit”?

In a sentence “She wore a Haunted Mansion themed outfit.” Should there be any hyphens? a) a Haunted Mansion themed outfit b) a Haunted-Mansion themed outfit c) a Haunted-Mansion-themed outfit d) a ...
Nikki Wynne's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
42 views

Order: "Yours and Derricks" or "Derrick and yours"? [duplicate]

I am thanking 2 people for their help. Do I say Yours and Dericks support or Derrick and your support Which is correct?
Karen Brown's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
90 views

Do native English speakers tend to take the second part of a compound first name for a middle name?

My first name is "Jean-Baptiste". "Baptiste" is not a second or middle name, however I noticed that it's not unusual for native English speakers to address me just as "Jean&...
Jean-Baptiste's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
68 views

Hyphen as compound modifier for mph

I searched but couldn't find the rule. Is a hyphen required for a compound modifier used with mph? I understand it is used for something like "a 6-percent increase." Example: (1) A 20-mph ...
TechWriterTen's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
30 views

Time off request or time-off request? [duplicate]

Hello fellow grammar lovers! I need some help. I'm working on HR resources and have run into a bit of a conundrum about how to write about PTO. I know that I "would like to take time off." ...
user482599's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
56 views

Does the word "non-companies" exist? Is it usual?

I'm seeing some results on Google but it seems quite an unusual word combination. Is it okay to use it or would it be considered "weird"? Context: Free for non-companies We believe Open ...
brillout's user avatar
  • 318
0 votes
0 answers
63 views

Zero-derived nouns in compound verbs

I recently read Wierzbicka 1984 (see Bożena Cetnarowska 1993) and I found this interesting footnote where she points out that some compound verbs of the form have a(n) NP require that the head noun of ...
Zoltan's user avatar
  • 463
0 votes
0 answers
31 views

Hyphenating modifiers

Sometimes it's easy to tell when modifiers need to be hyphenated, such as "time-dependent model", "well-known problem", etc. But sometimes I get confused whether the noun is ...
yiyfy's user avatar
  • 1
-1 votes
2 answers
124 views

Confused about compound nouns vs. adjectives

I was taught that "ball-point pen" = compound noun, but "ball-point" is NOT an adjective because it doesn't pass the primary tests for an adjective (has adjective-making morpheme, ...
Dee's user avatar
  • 97
2 votes
3 answers
861 views

The origin of awesomesauce and weak sauce

John's awesomesauce weekend in Vegas ended prematurely. And he prayed with such authority that my prayers felt like weak sauce by comparison. How did the words awesomesauce and weak sauce originate ...
Goku - stands with Palestine's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
79 views

Suspending non-hyphenated compounds of two nouns [closed]

I know that I can use hyphens to suspend compounds that are written with a hyphen to begin with, for example "first-class fares and second-class fares" can be written as "first- and ...
Joe7's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes
1 answer
86 views

Why are compound words not entirely consistent?

Some compound words are separated by a space (e.g. ice cream). Others are simply joined together (e.g. football, doorknob). Others still are hyphenated (e.g. long-term, off-topic). Why is the handling ...
user467410's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
54 views

Are Loan words still compound? [closed]

English imports lots of foreign words. If those words are compound in their original language, do we still consider them compound in English? Examples Kindergarten Chickpea ???
Dan Grahn's user avatar
  • 482
1 vote
1 answer
292 views

"still-warm" or "still-beating" heart - hyphen or no?

A copy editor wants to remove the hyphen from the "still-warm" in a (medieval-themed) comic: A noise very much like the sound of me ripping your still-warm heart from your ribcage. I ...
jps7's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
0 answers
40 views

Hyphens in compound words where the second word is a verb [duplicate]

Do you hyphenate a compound word made from a noun and a verb, such as 'hand knitted', when the compound does not come before a noun? E.g.: 'This jumper is hand knitted.'
AJB's user avatar
  • 151
6 votes
10 answers
5k views

A word for "a message to myself"

I am looking for a concise way to write “a message to myself”. Message could be replaced with letter or mail. In context, I'm using this word to represent a digital message I have written to myself ...
Psyntax's user avatar
  • 79
4 votes
1 answer
1k views

Differences between "machine learning" and "machine-learning" [duplicate]

I am currently editing a scientific text in which the term "machine learning" (ML) appears several times with a hyphen (i.e., "machine-learning") and several times without. Are ...
Enk9456's user avatar
  • 41
0 votes
1 answer
173 views

Does "increasingly larger" imply an increasing rate of growth?

We often say things become "increasingly larger/bigger", like "The problem of [...] is becoming an increasingly larger issue". I was wondering if the addition of the word "...
name.disp's user avatar
  • 103
0 votes
1 answer
51 views

How to say "the health of a system" in a shorter way?

Compound words keep troubling me... I am writing an academic article about detecting the health of a system or a piece of equipment. For example, if a coffee machine works correctly, it means it has a ...
Elise Le's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
89 views

Use of pos­ses­sive apos­tro­phe with the sec­ond word of a com­pound proper noun like “Aus­tralian States”

I have a rel­a­tively sim­ple ques­tion, but I am just a lit­tle con­fused and po­ten­tially mis­in­formed. My un­der­stand­ing is that when plu­ral­is­ing a pos­ses­sive noun, you add an apos­tro­phe ...
Dat Boi's user avatar
  • 129
0 votes
2 answers
62 views

Do I have a dependent clause or independent? [closed]

Sam got dressed, and it was time for school. Or Sam got dressed because it was time for school. Both the sentences sound correct to me. It seems the clause "it was time for school" can be ...
Noob's user avatar
  • 103
1 vote
1 answer
506 views

How to hyphenate this phrase [duplicate]

I know that compound adjectives like "goal-oriented" get hyphenated before a noun, but how would you deal with two sets of compound words that both end in "oriented"? It would be ...
Rdunn310's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
81 views

Is this word an example of agglutination or compounding? [closed]

One of the longest words* in the English dictionary is supercalifraglisticexpialidocious and introduced in the OED in 1931. However, is this word an example of compounding or agglutination. People say ...
Kelly's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
0 answers
57 views

-ed suffix in compounds [closed]

I read somewhere in a book on morphology that -ed suffix in compounds conveys the notion of having something, therefore "a one-armed man" means " a man having one arm", so i was ...
Antichrist's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
226 views

Suffixes that are words: why aren't they considered compounds?

There are some common suffixes, -less, -able, -full, and -wise, that are also full words on their own. Why isn't adding these words on considered compound words instead of suffixes? Or to say it ...
Ferhad's user avatar
  • 31
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

Are multiple hyphenations allowed in extending compound words like "well-controlled"? [duplicate]

It is common to write the phrase "well controlled" as a single, hyphenated adjective, "well-controlled". If my intention is to place additional adverbs in front of the hyphenated ...
Daphne's user avatar
  • 113
0 votes
1 answer
102 views

Should I use hyphenation on compounds consisting of three nouns?

In our software, we extract/detect information from/on images, e.g., face features and hand gestures. When referring to these processes, should it be...? "face feature extraction" and "...
Tobias Hermann's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
83 views

Does the omission of the first part of a hyphenated compound run afoul of Chicago?

The top answer to the question Suspended hyphen in "ever-expanding and contracting gulf"? states that "ever-expanding and -contracting" runs afoul of Chicago. (I would have asked ...
prsm's user avatar
  • 11
3 votes
2 answers
181 views

When two words produce a distinct meaning

I've thought about how we say "bad guy", when we refer to a character in a game or a story, with a different cadence than we say "bad guy", when we mean "a guy who is bad"...
Lua's user avatar
  • 33
0 votes
0 answers
403 views

Hyphens for compound range in "He will be at the job for one to two years"?

Came across something written like "He will be at the job for two to three years." A colleague suggested it should be "two-to-three years." I disagreed. I see the rationale for a ...
DEs1's user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
2 answers
96 views

A word for being willing to accept the decisions and/or actions of machines

Is there a word that describes the attitude of a human willingly accepting the decisions and/or actions of machines (automation, robots, control systems, etc). e.g. I have just bought a new car with ...
FactIM's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
2 answers
473 views

Identifying Compound words in Modern English

Compound words like SNOWMAN etc, are obvious compound words in Modern English, as both words that make up the compound word exist as words in Modern English. However, words like SHEPHERD aren't words ...
nofil88776's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
357 views

Which is the correct way to write "Back-end Engineer"? [closed]

On the web, I find the following common ways of punctuating and capitalising "Back-end Engineer" as a job title. Back-End Engineer Back-end Engineer Backend Engineer Which of these is ...
Alexander Popov's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
80 views

Can a compound modifier include a verb or be a sentence?

Recently, my significant other and I were sharing our reactions to an image of someone who looked much older than they actually were on social media. We were texting each other. I captioned the ...
Tolga's user avatar
  • 279
1 vote
0 answers
120 views

what is the meaning of 'to wear one's breeches out' and 'rat-gutted'?

I am quoting from the Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, The Gloria Scott by Arthur Conan Doyle: Now, you don't think it likely that a man who could do anything is going to wear his breeches out sitting in ...
aissam's user avatar
  • 775
0 votes
1 answer
53 views

Correct usage with compound nouns [closed]

He met an accomplished Hogwarts Witch Hermione Granger. (incorrect) 1'. He met an accomplished Hogwarts Witch, Hermione Granger.(correct)(accepting capitalisation) He met a Witch Hermione Granger. (...
bluebell1's user avatar
  • 265
2 votes
1 answer
123 views

Are reflexive pronouns typically used in compound objects?

We can all agree that the reflexive pronoun in this sentence is necessary:I bought drinks for myself. However, I cannot seem to find a definitive answer regarding the following sentence:I bought ...
Willy's user avatar
  • 23
0 votes
0 answers
2k views

Correct hyphenation of age groups (18-25-year-olds / 18- to 25-year-olds / 18 to 25-year-olds)

As the title suggests, I'd like to ask your opinion on the correct way (or most common/recommended way) to write about different age groups. Let's imagine you have a table showing several age groups ...
Mack's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
152 views

How do you diagram a sentence that has a nominal phrase that is described by an adjective using the Reed-Kellogg system?

I have the following sentence: I hope everyone had a nice holiday weekend. My understanding is that "holiday weekend" is a compound noun nominal phrase, since it would be incorrect to say &...
plexi's user avatar
  • 3
0 votes
1 answer
260 views

“Half an hour” and “half hour” adverbs

If the rate per hour is the hourly rate, what do you call the rate for half an hour? What is the rate for 2 hours known as?
Nuñito Calzada's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
93 views

Why is barefeet not a word?

The question might seem absurd, but I am curious as to why 'barefeet' is not a valid English word. Why is it 'barefoot' and not 'barefeet'?
DaveIdito's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
1 answer
50 views

Single opening with multiple doors: "trapdoor" or "trapdoors"

Is it "a trapdoor" or "trapdoors" for one opening with two or more doors covering it? One example is the one(s) covering Black Horse Inn's cellar. Clearly it is plural when there ...
Micah Lindstrom's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
246 views

Is it "multi-element" or "multi-elemental"? "Multi-attribute" or "multi-attributed"?

I've seen both being used, so I'm having a hard time telling which one is correct. Logic dictates that it's supposed to be "multi-elemental" and "multi-attributed," considering we ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
313 views

Neither-nor, usage of neither-nor with verb [closed]

Which one is correct? 1. Neither anything changed nor we were informed. 2. Neither changed anything nor were we informed.
Munna's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
590 views

Pride and joy as a plural

I just came across some text in a book which stated, “it was one of his prides and joys“. That sounds wrong to me. It seems as if it should be pride and joys, since that phrase is considered a ...
Spankyd's user avatar
  • 21
1 vote
0 answers
51 views

Is there a semantic difference between 'supply-demand gap' and 'demand-supply gap'?

I have confirmed that both 'supply-demand gap' and 'demand-supply gap' have been used, although the latter is by far more common. I wonder if X-Y gap suggests that X was higher than Y, or vice-versa? ...
harry's user avatar
  • 117
-1 votes
1 answer
59 views

Gerunds/present participles of two-verb compounds

I use making-believe instead of make-believing if I need to make a gerund/present participle out of "make-believe", but I just saw this line: Brenda rode along, make-believing she was a knight ...
Eddie Kal's user avatar
  • 1,152
0 votes
0 answers
30 views

Question about noun compound

I need to convert some noun compounds into regular sentences, and I am having trouble with four of them: 1) greatly reduced atmospheric ozone depletion. 2) an airport air traffic controller. 3) air ...
Dani's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
0 answers
62 views

word, noun, and compound noun

A noun is defined in Oxford as: A word (other than a pronoun) used to identify any of a class of people, places, or things (common noun), or to name a particular one of these (proper noun). A ...
JK2's user avatar
  • 6,481

1
2 3 4 5
8