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Questions about words that are created by combining two or more other words together.

0
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1answer
30 views

In which grammatical number should the first word in a compound be? [duplicate]

I've recently caught myself spending too much time wondering about several off-sounding compounds I've come across, e.g. browsers list (as in, a list of browsers) and tasks queue (as in, a queue of ...
0
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1answer
31 views

“-field” joining rule for compound words?

Is there a rule when to join a word with field and when to leave them as two separate words? Examples: I walked through a cornfield. I walked through a maize field. I walked through a ...
0
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1answer
49 views

Dash after the prefix “non”

Is the hyphen that we often see in words such as "non-zero", "non-trivial", etc. optional? In case the answer is negative, is there any rule of thumb on which one may rely in order to recall when ...
0
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1answer
18 views

Client and server side componets

I'm having a problem to refer to the components that are in both, the client-side and the server-side. I started writing: "client and server-side components" (1) I did that in order to avoid ...
1
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1answer
136 views

Is there a term for an equivocal compound e.g. “guinea pig”

"Sweetbread," "guinea pig," "shortbread" (a typical Scottish biscuit), "egg cream" (a carbonated drink), and "firefly" are all not what their two nouns claim. A sweetbread is neither sweet nor ...
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3answers
22 views

Term for entering a market with a lower pricing and simpler offer [business] [closed]

There is a term meant to describe the following situation, in business strategy: Suppose there is a market with a few companies acting as a closed oligopoly, with only full-featured and very pricey ...
0
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0answers
28 views

What is the verb portion of a hyphenated/compound/multiword adjective or noun called?

For example, in the noun "victim-blaming", what is the "blaming" part called? Is it some special type of verb, or perhaps something else? Words of this form can generally be made up and can still be ...
0
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1answer
52 views

Compound Adjectives: Usage after “is” / Usage with noun

I'm currently writing a text in which I have some object called a graph, which has the attribute of being planar in a special way, namely in the multi-level way. I'm pretty certain that I should call ...
2
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1answer
129 views

The use of “vicinity”

The noun "vicinity" is used with the preposition "in" before it and sometimes with "of" after it: There are a few hotels in the vicinity. There is a good shop in the vicinity of the station. ...
7
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7answers
1k views

I am a pansexual trans/gender-fluid person

There's a risk of me potentially offending someone but I am an outsider trying to get to grips with this terminology. Online, I read someone who identified themself as a pansexual trans/gender-...
0
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0answers
28 views

sentence identification

What are these sentences ? The moors, which were covered in heather, appeared mystical under the gray mist. My favorite type of food is Japanese, especially sushi, I wish I knew how to make it myself ...
0
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1answer
31 views

Which is more correct: “two- or three-note riff” or “two-or-three-note riff”?

When I read "two- or three-note riff," I sense an emphasis on the riff containing two notes with an occasional third note; whereas, a two-or-three-note riff seems to mean either or. Am I reading too ...
0
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0answers
27 views

Term for repetition of compound words with the same ending root

What is the formal literary term to describe two or more compound words with the same ending root? For instance: heartbeat and hoofbeat In this example, the root "beat" is repeated. How is this ...
0
votes
2answers
80 views

Trade marks or trademarks?

What is the correct format to use when referring to trademarks in British English? Is "trademarks" generally preferable? I've seen both used in different contexts, the UK GOV page uses "trade marks", ...
1
vote
2answers
102 views

Intelligent-intensive or Intelligence-intensive?

Which of the titular phrases is the most appropriate and correct to express a work or task that mainly relies on the intelligence of an entity? Stats of matches from Google Books: Intelligent-...
0
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1answer
64 views

Hyphen in compound word?

Better with or without hyphen? Dollar-quotes Use dollar-quoted strings to simplify! Use dollar-quoting to simplify! Does it matter whether the second part is another noun? And does it make a ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Why it is “Okun's Law” and “Philips Curve” rather than “Okun Law” and “Philips' Curve”? [duplicate]

How exactly do these kinds of compound words work? "Okun's Law" and "Philips Curve" rather than "Okun Law" and "Philips' Curve"? Is there any grammar book I can look for?
0
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0answers
53 views

Spelling multiplayer vs. multi-player [duplicate]

English adjectives tend to compound using hyphens (-), whereas nouns usually compound simply by putting two words together: “a mind-blowing sailboat”. Then why is there a “multiplayer game” and not “...
4
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3answers
104 views

Is there a word for confusing words like 'everyday' with phrases like 'every day'?

I see people confusing words that are compounded from two words with a phrase made from those words. This is easy to do, as they look and sound very similar: For example: "everyday", an adjective, ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Two-word verbs described with One-word nouns

I've noticed that certain (compound?) verbs are combined into one word when the process is used as a noun. It seems to generally be processes with a preposition in them. If the noun isn't combined ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Why is the sentence “millennial-tinged”?

I recently came upon with a sentence: In her office at Oxford University Press, Paton was drafting a brand new entry for the Oxford English Dictionary. Also in her in-tray when I visited were the ...
0
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0answers
49 views

Is “a-okay” acceptable in lowercase?

Interestingly, Merriam-Webster has an entry for "A-OK" but not for "A-okay." Most other dictionaries I have referenced have an entry for "A-okay" including Oxford Living Dictionaries, dictionary.com,...
0
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0answers
83 views

Use singular or plural in lists of compound nouns like “the English and French teacher(s)”?

I have been wondering about whether to use singular or plural in lists of compound nouns where the second part of the compound noun is not repeated as in “the English and the French teacher” rather ...
0
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0answers
18 views

Spelling compound nouns [duplicate]

recently I have come across some nouns such as "candlelights", that is to say, they are a combination of two nouns and I do not know when to attach these kind of words with each other as in my IGCSE ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Hyphenation in compounds with abbreviation remarks

So far I understood, that hyphenation should aid readability. Examples [1, 2]: North America-based company A Gaussian mixture model-based approach We propose spherical Gaussian-based ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

“Filepath” or “file path”? [closed]

A path, the general form of the name of a file or directory, specifies a unique location in a file system. "Filename" is a compound, but how about "filepath"/"file path"? "Filepath" seems incorrect ...
0
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1answer
2k views

“Try and get some rest” OR “Try to get some rest”? [duplicate]

Which sentence is grammatically correct? Try and get some rest (or) Try to get some rest
1
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3answers
175 views

How to correctly hyphenate a phrase with clarifying word in parenthesis

How do I correctly hyphenate this phrase: using a client (browser) initiated session using a client- (browser-) initiated session using a client (browser)-initiated session The session ...
-3
votes
1answer
53 views

preposition modifying compound object

"The ethical standard is to abstain from sexual intimacies with colleagues or with staff for whom you have supervisory, evaluative, or instructional responsibility." Does the above sentence mean ...
7
votes
4answers
1k views

What's the plural of “Confirmation of Entry”?

I've recently wondered about the plural of the expression "Confirmation of Entry". A "Confirmation of Entry" is a piece of paper that Cambridge Assessment English gives candidates who are going to ...
0
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0answers
34 views

What does “spam-in-a-can crush” mean? [duplicate]

I am reading Charles Krauthammer's "Things that matter" and bumped into a sentence read as: The airport, where that inspired flight attendant did what everyone who’s ever been in the spam-in-a-can ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Feminine form of “god king/emperor”

I'm trying to figure out what the correct feminine forms of "god king" and "god emperor" are. Do I just replace "king" and "emperor" with their feminine equivalents (i.e. "god queen" and "god empress")...
3
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1answer
658 views

What are the two parts to a compound word?

I'm wondering what each word that compromise a compound word is called. For example, You would say: "Life" is the first ____ in "lifetime". There are two ____s in "lifetime". Is the answer I am ...
1
vote
1answer
184 views

Why is the noun “blacklist” (written without a space) in the dictionary, but not “whitelist”? [closed]

Checking Oxford Dictionaries Online, I find the noun blacklist, written as one word, and the noun white list, written as two. There is no black list defined as a compound written open, and there is no ...
1
vote
0answers
92 views

How to avoid ambiguity and convey specific meaning in compound names ? (name + name)

There are already other questions regarding compound names (noun + noun) and now I better understand the general rule, which seems to be, unless dealing with an exception, to only make plural one of ...
2
votes
1answer
487 views

Somewhere, somewhat, somehow, some…day? [duplicate]

While talking to myself the other day, I noticed something odd. We have the five W words and the H: What When Where Who Why How I've heard three of these words said with "some" at the start: ...
0
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0answers
184 views

Can “Executive Decision” be considered a complex word?

My professor assigned a definition essay and requested a complex word. I chose 'executive decision' because I used the term in a previous essay and she marked it as unclear and wrote "what does that ...
6
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2answers
2k views

Presidents Elect or President-Elects?

If you have several presidents awaiting inauguration, should we refer to them as Presidents Elect or President-Elects?
0
votes
1answer
79 views

In a statistical model context, “overfitting” or “over fitting”? [closed]

I have been writing a research proposal. In a particular part of the proposal, I talk about statistical methods that will be used to avoid "overfitting." This is a statistical concept describing a ...
1
vote
1answer
20k views

“high school”, “highschool”, or “high-school” [closed]

In English usage, should one use high-school, high school, or highschool? (Assume American English; I understand that the Brits call it secondary school.)
0
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0answers
80 views

to belly dance as a compound verb

Is it totally correct to say 'Have you tried to belly dance?' instead of 'Have you tried belly dancing?'. In some dictionaries there is definition of 'belly dance' as an intransitive compound verb. ...
1
vote
1answer
405 views

Syntax of “two-letter word,” “five-mile run,” “three-hour play”?

Araucaria's answer to the following ELL question ("Why is “letter” not plural in “two letter words”?") brought up an interesting issue that I am still unsure about. What is the internal syntactic ...
0
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0answers
1k views

“dance lessons” vs. “dancing lessons”

Related: Is the word "Dance" a noun in "Dance Class"? I just came across the phrase dance lessons and I was wondering why some people find it acceptable instead of dancing lessons....
0
votes
1answer
159 views

Learning to write compound words

I'm writing an academic text in American English. I'm not sure about the compound words: DB-9 connector end-of-packet 16-bit registers Avalon-MM slave interface RS-232 ...
0
votes
2answers
52 views

Compound wording and how to write it [closed]

Which one is right? "We show how formal models of hardware peripherals improve the state-of-the-art security models." or "We show how formal models of hardware peripherals improve the state of the ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

Should it be “clotted cream scones” or “clotted-cream scones”? [duplicate]

I'm eating clotted cream-covered scones. or I'm eating clotted-cream-covered scones. or I'm eating clotted cream covered scones. Formally, I thought they'd have to be clotted-cream scones, ...
3
votes
1answer
639 views

“A things thing” or “a thing thing”?

This has been confusing me for quite a long time, when it comes to noun+noun form of compound nouns there are words which I see that have plural in the first noun but some stay as singular. Some ...
1
vote
1answer
128 views

What is the etymology of “blameshift”?

I find it rather hard to look up the word "blameshift" in a dictionary. It appears in some dictionaries, but not many. The one dictionary I have found it in is Wiktionary. But I was unable to find ...
2
votes
1answer
993 views

Preferred writing (adjective): ‘offshore’ or ‘off-shore’ [closed]

I wonder what the preferred writing is of ‘off-shore’/‘offshore’, as an adjective to, e.g., (wind) farm. From the answer given in the similar question about ‘off-road’/‘offroad’/‘off road’, I would ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Is there a more detailed classification of English adjectives and their ordering?

I recently come across several particular noun phrases/compounds such as "Automatic emergency light" (as the name of a product) "the fourth consecutive monthly decline" (as in "Consumers paid ...