Questions tagged [compound-adjectives]

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2answers
257 views

Intelligent-intensive or Intelligence-intensive?

Which of the titular phrases is the most appropriate and correct to express a work or task that mainly relies on the intelligence of an entity? Stats of matches from Google Books: Intelligent-...
10
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2answers
408 views

How old is the practice of hyphenating compound adjectives?

In Shakespeare’s Henry IV Part One at 1.3.230 Hotspur refers to Hal contemptuously as that same sword-and-buckler Prince of Wales At Internet Shakespeare Editions the “Modern” ...
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0answers
57 views

Is “top-of-the-line” or specific forms of compound adjective colloquial? Any general rule?

I am asking this question in the context of writing an academic paper. I am thinking if there exists a general rule regards to judging whether a compound adjective is colloquial, and, in this instance,...
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1answer
105 views

Compound Adjectives Separated by “or”

I'd like to say the following and I'm wondering if I should keep the hyphen after "ground": Ground- or boat-based observations are difficult. Since the individual pieces pieces of that sentence ...
1
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0answers
257 views

Using multiple compound adjectives in single sentence

Can one use multiple compound adjectives in a single sentence? Example: Packed with energy-rich power, these batteries are specially formulated for power-hungry, high-drain devices.
1
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1answer
511 views

How to hyphenate a phrasal adjective: PCI-compliant

I have a phrase I use often in my work, but I'm not sure if I'm hyphenating it correctly. As it stands, I've been writing it like this: The PCI-compliant payment gateway... I think PCI-compliant is a ...
-2
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1answer
115 views

For those who use American English, how do you use your dictionary for this? [closed]

Please DO NOT answer this question if you use British English. You might help by answering the other question I posted just before this one. I have found examples suggesting there is a fundamental ...
2
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2answers
432 views

Do AmE and BrE dictionaries treat compound adjectives differently?

My (BrE) OED and (AmE) dictionary.com both list the adjective 'middle-class' with a hyphen. The OED provides these examples: a middle-class attitude The magazine is very middle-class. The (AmE)...
6
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2answers
86 views

Phrasal adjective before/after noun. US/UK usage split?

Over on ELL I was a bit surprised by a (competent) native speaker of American English saying Books hard to find can be expensive is to my AmE ear no less idiomatic than Hard-to-find books can be ...
3
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3answers
256 views

“Church Catholic” versus “Catholic Church” is the first form acceptable?

I heard both expressions, but the first sounds more "creedal". Although, just the second is fine according to the English language norms. When is "Church Catholic" fine to be used? The Merriam Webster ...
0
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1answer
132 views

Does the order of adjectives, “fresh” and “fried”, affect meaning? [closed]

Fresh fried fish Fried fresh fish Fish fried fresh Fish fresh fried Fried fish fresh What's the difference between the ways of writing the same idea above? What are the ...
0
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3answers
347 views

Adjective for having enough and satisfactory food [closed]

I have eaten enough food. The food was delicious and may be I have eaten a lot more than required. I enjoyed it. Now I am very happy about it. How to describe this? Should we say "I have had enough ...
2
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1answer
2k views

“It is happy for me to …” and “It is glad for me to…”

Okay, so my students in Japan keep using “it is happy for me to…” “…it is glad for me to…” I know it is incorrect and the words happy and glad can be changed with others to make some ...
8
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3answers
1k views

What does “consequence-free chance” mean?

I read this sentence on TIME (Oct.23 2017), Having announced that he will retire at the end of 2018, Corker, once a key Trump ally, could emerge as a leading check on some of the President’s worst ...
1
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1answer
87 views

U.S Men's National Team or U.S Men National Team [duplicate]

Can you explain which one is correct or if both are correct, under which scenario one is more suitable than the other? I have this doubt in general, when to use nouns as adjectives or possession like ...
0
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2answers
80 views

'The snap election results' or 'The snap-election results'? [closed]

Which of the two is grammatically correct? The snap election results are in. The snap-election results are in. The sentence should refer to the results of an election that was announced suddenly and ...
-1
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1answer
3k views

How should the phrase “thank you” be written in the following sentence? [duplicate]

According to prevalent formal writing style rules, Should the phrase be in quotes (as in "thank you" or thank you)? Should T of Thank be capital? Should there be a hyphen? They did not give him a ...
4
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2answers
713 views

Which is correct, criterion- or criteria- in a compound adjective?

Which is correct "criterion-based analysis" or "criteria-based analysis?" I have seen "criterion-referenced testing" and also "criteria-based assessment." I understand "criteria" is the plural and I ...
-2
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1answer
41 views

Adjective position [closed]

1.Mathematics teacher 2.Mathematic teacher 3.Teacher in mathematics Which one is grammatically correct ?
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1answer
2k views

Should “heavy-duty” always be hyphenated when used as an adjective? [closed]

An example term: super heavy-duty construction
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0answers
40 views

Hyphenation Query (Compound words hyphenated alongside adjectival phrases?) [duplicate]

Not sure if I've correctly titled this query; my grammatical lexicon is severely wanting. The phrase in question is from a short story, and is as follows: "More likely a second—floor-apartment ...
0
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1answer
67 views

Should a phrasal adjective be hyphenated when its modifier is omitted?

With modifier: We were going on an air-to-air photo mission. Without: We were going on our first air to air. OR We were going on our first air-to-air.
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1answer
208 views

“Half-Blooded Prince” vs “Half-Blood Prince”

We all know there is the novel called "Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince" "half-blood" is compound adjective modifying Prince. But, what is difference when we use "half-blooded Prince" instead ...
0
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1answer
153 views

“strange-noise-making machine” is a correct phrase?

I wonder if these phrase following is correct? Can you help me "strange-noise-making machine" "Make-strange-noise machine" If they are not correct, how can we fix it? Examples: My motorbike is ...
0
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2answers
81 views

“For him not going” or “his not going”

For him not going to party was a big mistake. His not going to party was a big mistake. I think in the first sentence gives a sense that he is sad as he missed the party. The second sentence ...
0
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1answer
92 views

Left to themselves — is a 'when' needed? [closed]

I read, in Arthur Bloch's hilarious "Murphy's Law", the following corollary to Murphy's Law: Left to themselves, things tend to go from bad to worse. Is that grammatical? Does the clause before ...
0
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1answer
143 views

The use of “over-” as an excess term (as in “overzealous”)

Is the word "overzealous" only used in a negative sense? Because I understand that "over-exaggerate" is used in a negative way due to it's double-excessive use. Would that mean any excessive term ...
2
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1answer
856 views

Syntax of “two-letter word,” “five-mile run,” “three-hour play”?

Araucaria's answer to the following ELL question ("Why is “letter” not plural in “two letter words”?") brought up an interesting issue that I am still unsure about. What is the internal syntactic ...
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2answers
175 views

Is it correct to use 'present' after a noun or pronoun?

Can an adjective go just after a noun? The teachers present in the hall are my life saviours. In this sentence is using 'present in the hall' right or should I say 'presenting in the hall'?
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0answers
39 views

Should it be “clotted cream scones” or “clotted-cream scones”? [duplicate]

I'm eating clotted cream-covered scones. or I'm eating clotted-cream-covered scones. or I'm eating clotted cream covered scones. Formally, I thought they'd have to be clotted-cream scones, ...
2
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2answers
159 views

What does 'removed from' mean when it's used with some type of material?

The following is a quote from the computer science classic, "The Mythical Man-Month" (1975). Finally, there is the delight of working in such a tractable medium. The programmer, like the poet, ...
1
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0answers
80 views

Multiple nouns compounding with the same adjective

What is the correct way of writing resource-intensive and knowledge-intensive in contracted form? Would it be: Resource- and knowledge-intensive? Or: Resource and knowledge-intensive?
2
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1answer
2k views

Preferred writing (adjective): ‘offshore’ or ‘off-shore’ [closed]

I wonder what the preferred writing is of ‘off-shore’/‘offshore’, as an adjective to, e.g., (wind) farm. From the answer given in the similar question about ‘off-road’/‘offroad’/‘off road’, I would ...
2
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1answer
456 views

>2-word compound modifiers and suspended hyphens

I have been taught that when creating compound modifiers, a hyphen (-) should be used if the compound consists of two words, while an en-dash (–) is used if the compound consists of three or more ...
2
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3answers
3k views

Commas with multiple compound adjectives

When adding commas between adjectives, I usually ask myself the following questions: Can I swap the adjectives and still get the same meaning? Can I add the word "and" between the two adjectives and ...
28
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6answers
6k views

What's a word for the shape of the space among the trees in a forest?

I'm writing a proposal that contrasts systems with two different geometries. I'm looking for a word or short phrase (preferably non-technical), that would describe one of the geometries, which is ...
2
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3answers
3k views

Should there be a hyphen in expressions such as “currently-available X”?

My natural instinct is to hyphenate expressions such as "currently-available", "currently-implemented", etc., when they modify a noun. Example: "the currently-available version of X". It seems to me ...
0
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1answer
616 views

Is a hyphen necessary in the compound adjective “the already quite surprising idea”?

[I just wrote]: The expression "you may/might (just) as well + infinitive" can be used sarcastically and emphatically to introduce a more exaggerated, extreme example than the already quite surprising ...
1
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1answer
61 views

Mixing hyphenated prefixes with cased hyphenated compound modifiers

Suppose I know two professors. Both of them are old, and both of them study English. Then each one is an old English professor. Suppose one and only one of them is a scholar of Old English. Then ...
2
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2answers
828 views

Use of -esque in compound-adjective phrases

I know the suffix '-esque' can be used in the following situations: Ever since he showed up on the music scene as a marvelously talented teenager, there’s been a hint of Sinatra-esque swagger ...
4
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1answer
2k views

Should hyphenated compound words be permitted to break across lines?

When using a hyphenated compound word (i.e., a compound adjective, verb, or noun) in a document and the word splits across two lines due to it being at the end of a line, is it considered improper to ...
1
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1answer
293 views

Why are nouns in counting adjectival phrases singular?

Basically, why is it: "two-item plate" "three-person table" "two-man race" I was trying to find a rule (or a style guide reference or something) that I could pass on to a friend that explains why ...
1
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1answer
441 views

“Is far from…” - How do I connote the simile, without the literal connotation?

In using a contrasting simile, I think I have fallen into a trap. I want to say: The academy is far from a placid house of learning. In the sense of: The academy is not at all a serene place ...
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3answers
2k views

Question about “stranger-than-fiction” in a sentence from the novel “Waterland” [closed]

I am not very clear about the meaning of the phrase "stranger-than-fiction" from the novel "Waterland" that was written by Graham Swift. http://www.fiction2.com/waterland-online-graham-swift?page=0,2 ...
1
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2answers
236 views

Which is correct: Saint Poetic Tradition or Saintly-Poetic Tradition or Saint-Poetic Tradition?

Which is correct: The Saint Poetic Tradition or The Saintly-Poetic Tradition or the Saint-Poetic Tradition? I want to write about the tradition of poets who were also saints. Which of the above is ...
0
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1answer
403 views

noun phrase as an adjective

We know that a noun phrase contains at least a noun or a pronoun and for the most part, these phrases can be replaced by a pronoun. Ex: "We spoke to [the old guy that lives in the little shed on the ...
0
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1answer
664 views

Hyphenating Multiple Compound Adjectives With Common First Word

I have a feeling this question has already been asked, but couldn't find it by searching. I found people asking about hyphenation of multiple compound adjectives with a common second word, but I'm ...
0
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1answer
133 views

Korea Government vs Korean Government? [closed]

Simply Question, As a foreigner, I am really confused when to use Adjective or Noun before Noun. Which one is correct? I have seen the both of them many times. Korea Government vs Korean Government ...
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1answer
20k views

When you say “big old” or “big ol' ” adjectivally, should a comma come in between?

Coordinate adjectives require a comma in between, for example: That's a big, red house. But it looks odd to write "big, old" or "big, ol'," for example: That's a big, ol' house. Rather, it's looks ...
1
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4answers
108 views

Adjective for objects (graphs, networks or polygons) having the same number of edges

I am looking for an adjective form to describe similar geometric objects (graphs, networks, polygons) that have "the same number of edges" (for a technical audience, a scientific paper). [EDIT] Based ...