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Questions tagged [compound-adjectives]

The tag has no usage guidance.

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25 views

My question is about compounds adjectives

I have been reading archaeological literature in english and some descriptions are constructed with several complex compound adjectives. My question is when you have for example “soft hammer flakes” ...
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0answers
25 views

Is there a technique used when someone splits a compound noun into two parts?

My student has asked whether the splitting of the compound word keyhole into key hole is a particular literary technique. I didn't know! It's relevant to the text, as it is about disconnection and ...
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1answer
61 views

Do I need the hyphen?

"Part-Time" in the beginning of this sentence is technically a compound adjective to employment, but it is separated by "or temporary." Do I still hyphenate "part-time"? The same question holds for "...
3
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1answer
139 views

spatio or spatial

Searching the Google scholar, "spatio-temporal" returnn 778,000 hits, "spatial-temporal" returns 798,000 hits, "spatial-temporal scales" returns 3,620 hits, "spatio-temporal scales" returns 13,...
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3answers
95 views

Is “urban-rural gap” a proper English term for a disparity between urban and rural areas or just a word-for-word translation from Chinese?

I came across this phrase when I was reading a research paper. Here's a quote from the abstract: I find that the urban-rural gap accounts for 40% of mean country inequality and much of its cross-...
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3answers
52 views

Looking for a specific synonym of “selfish”

A word or phrase that describes best a specific type of person or their behavior. The type of person that would not act upon a threat if said threat is not affecting their personal well-being directly....
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1answer
35 views

Saddle-point problem vs saddle point problem

I work in computer science/applied math, and I frequently see sentences such as "We wish to solve a bilinear saddle point problem." My problem is that this does not seem correct based on my ...
4
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1answer
121 views

10 Year Challenge

The hashtag 10yearchallenge is very trendy now, but the use of the compond adjective (10-year) makes it look like it's a challenge that spanned 10 years, however, it's the name of the challenge not an ...
2
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1answer
31 views

Hyphenation in “first century AD” etc as an adjective

I edit a lot of articles that contain phrases such as "A first century AD inscription..." or "First century BC writer Herodotus..." I know that a compound adjective before a noun is usually hyphenated,...
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2answers
97 views

What is the type of an adjective “fed up”

Recently, I stumbled upon a phrase "fed up" in one sentence. On the first glance, I was thinking it should be a phrasal verb but it didn't correlate with the sentence meaning. I found out that it is ...
0
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3answers
117 views

What word would work as a better substitute for “Stalker”?

Context I am working on a game and one of the Classes in it is "Rogue". (Original, I know.) I'm trying to find a term that accurately describes and can serve as a name for one of the Subclasses. (...
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3answers
62 views

“Typical liberal bulls-t” or “typically liberal bulls-t”?

My liberal friend wrote that he's gonna do some research soon. I asked, "Into what?" "[Redacted.] Typically liberal bullshit," he replied self-depricatingly. Then he corrects himself: "*typical" But ...
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2answers
259 views

What is the correct usage of hyphens with ranges (as in “a 5 to 10 minute rest”)?

I'm having issues with figuring out which is correct: "The teacher told the students to take a 5 to 10 minute rest." "The teacher told the students to take a 5-to-10 minute rest." "The teacher told ...
1
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1answer
125 views

What are the rules surrounding a hyphen following an abbreviation?

For instance, if something is owned by Apple Inc. does that make the compound phrasal adjective 'Apple Inc.-owned'? Or would I omit the period?
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4answers
181 views

How does one properly hyphenate compound adjectives that are locations?

Compound adjectives preceding a noun are hyphenated, but how does one properly hyphenate locations? Please include sources. E.g. hyphenated, compound adjective: state-of-the-art technology city, ...
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2answers
83 views

Hyphen usage with expressions in compound adjectives

Compound adjectives are hyphenated, e.g. "data-to-field binding". But how is the hyphen used when one of the words in the compound adjective is an expression? For example, how would you hyphenate the ...
1
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1answer
56 views

Is it better to list adjectives, with an “and”? [duplicate]

When we use more than one adjective, e.g. The big, red, bouncy balloon. The list of three adjectives {big, red, and bouncy} is a list, so by rights it should be separated by commas, with an "and" ...
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1answer
23 views

Client and server side componets

I'm having a problem to refer to the components that are in both, the client-side and the server-side. I started writing: "client and server-side components" (1) I did that in order to avoid ...
2
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1answer
70 views

hyphenation of compound adjectives [closed]

Proofreading a friend's work, I came across the following phrase: [teachers and students] work collaboratively to change long held, potentially incorrect and deeply believed views Now, while I'm ...
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1answer
96 views

Hyphenation of Compound Adjective

Is this correct: Representation of a 4 to 9-node-quadrilateral element? and this: which is the case of a multi-degree of freedom problem?
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6answers
526 views

Word for a country that has enough water for drinking, crops, forests, etc

When we refer to a country facing an acute scarcity of water, we use the compound adjective 'water-stressed' for that country. But what do you call a country that has enough water for drinking, crops,...
0
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1answer
71 views

Compound Adjectives: Usage after “is” / Usage with noun

I'm currently writing a text in which I have some object called a graph, which has the attribute of being planar in a special way, namely in the multi-level way. I'm pretty certain that I should call ...
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1answer
104 views

Is “dead” possible before any adjective?

I've seen combinations like "dead serious", "dead gorgeous" and... Is it possible to have "dead" before any other adjective(s)? Such as dead difficult or dead stupid? If not, how can one know which ...
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1answer
338 views

Hyphenating “Pulitzer Prize winning” as adjective

I'm looking for authority on hyphenating the following phrase with a compound modifier. Which is correct? She was a Pulitzer Prize winning reporter, or She was a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, or ...
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2answers
168 views

Intelligent-intensive or Intelligence-intensive?

Which of the titular phrases is the most appropriate and correct to express a work or task that mainly relies on the intelligence of an entity? Stats of matches from Google Books: Intelligent-...
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2answers
339 views

How old is the practice of hyphenating compound adjectives?

In Shakespeare’s Henry IV Part One at 1.3.230 Hotspur refers to Hal contemptuously as that same sword-and-buckler Prince of Wales At Internet Shakespeare Editions the “Modern” ...
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0answers
42 views

Is “top-of-the-line” or specific forms of compound adjective colloquial? Any general rule?

I am asking this question in the context of writing an academic paper. I am thinking if there exists a general rule regards to judging whether a compound adjective is colloquial, and, in this instance,...
0
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1answer
51 views

Compound Adjectives Separated by “or”

I'd like to say the following and I'm wondering if I should keep the hyphen after "ground": Ground- or boat-based observations are difficult. Since the individual pieces pieces of that sentence ...
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0answers
186 views

Using multiple compound adjectives in single sentence

Can one use multiple compound adjectives in a single sentence? Example: Packed with energy-rich power, these batteries are specially formulated for power-hungry, high-drain devices.
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1answer
101 views

For those who use American English, how do you use your dictionary for this? [closed]

Please DO NOT answer this question if you use British English. You might help by answering the other question I posted just before this one. I have found examples suggesting there is a fundamental ...
2
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2answers
299 views

Do AmE and BrE dictionaries treat compound adjectives differently?

My (BrE) OED and (AmE) dictionary.com both list the adjective 'middle-class' with a hyphen. The OED provides these examples: a middle-class attitude The magazine is very middle-class. The (AmE)...
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2answers
76 views

Phrasal adjective before/after noun. US/UK usage split?

Over on ELL I was a bit surprised by a (competent) native speaker of American English saying Books hard to find can be expensive is to my AmE ear no less idiomatic than Hard-to-find books can be ...
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0answers
136 views

Good-tempered vs. Well-tempered

good-tempered well-tempered good-temper well-tempered What is the different between these words? I did the cloze test and i found: I hardly find anyone as considerate and...........as she. A)....
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3answers
243 views

“Church Catholic” versus “Catholic Church” is the first form acceptable?

I heard both expressions, but the first sounds more "creedal". Although, just the second is fine according to the English language norms. When is "Church Catholic" fine to be used? The Merriam Webster ...
0
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1answer
101 views

Does the order of adjectives, “fresh” and “fried”, affect meaning? [closed]

Fresh fried fish Fried fresh fish Fish fried fresh Fish fresh fried Fried fish fresh What's the difference between the ways of writing the same idea above? What are the ...
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3answers
804 views

What does “consequence-free chance” mean?

I read this sentence on TIME (Oct.23 2017), Having announced that he will retire at the end of 2018, Corker, once a key Trump ally, could emerge as a leading check on some of the President’s worst ...
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1answer
67 views

U.S Men's National Team or U.S Men National Team [duplicate]

Can you explain which one is correct or if both are correct, under which scenario one is more suitable than the other? I have this doubt in general, when to use nouns as adjectives or possession like ...
4
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2answers
600 views

Which is correct, criterion- or criteria- in a compound adjective?

Which is correct "criterion-based analysis" or "criteria-based analysis?" I have seen "criterion-referenced testing" and also "criteria-based assessment." I understand "criteria" is the plural and I ...
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1answer
41 views

Adjective position [closed]

1.Mathematics teacher 2.Mathematic teacher 3.Teacher in mathematics Which one is grammatically correct ?
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1answer
1k views
0
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0answers
518 views

wide range and wide ranging

If I search online two possible use with the same word, I can see searching on bing (I cannot use google in the PRC) that for example "wide-range availability" seems more common than "wide-ranging ...
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0answers
39 views

Small enumeration of some people deaths [closed]

Events are being recapped. First died James, then both the twins that the reader already knows, then dies John's sister, then a statue gets broken. I'm translating an heavy-built phrase from Italian, ...
0
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0answers
35 views

Hyphenation Query (Compound words hyphenated alongside adjectival phrases?) [duplicate]

Not sure if I've correctly titled this query; my grammatical lexicon is severely wanting. The phrase in question is from a short story, and is as follows: "More likely a second—floor-apartment ...
0
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1answer
171 views

“Half-Blooded Prince” vs “Half-Blood Prince”

We all know there is the novel called "Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince" "half-blood" is compound adjective modifying Prince. But, what is difference when we use "half-blooded Prince" instead ...
0
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1answer
135 views

“strange-noise-making machine” is a correct phrase?

I wonder if these phrase following is correct? Can you help me "strange-noise-making machine" "Make-strange-noise machine" If they are not correct, how can we fix it? Examples: My motorbike is ...
0
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1answer
119 views

The use of “over-” as an excess term (as in “overzealous”)

Is the word "overzealous" only used in a negative sense? Because I understand that "over-exaggerate" is used in a negative way due to it's double-excessive use. Would that mean any excessive term ...
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1answer
553 views

Syntax of “two-letter word,” “five-mile run,” “three-hour play”?

Araucaria's answer to the following ELL question ("Why is “letter” not plural in “two letter words”?") brought up an interesting issue that I am still unsure about. What is the internal syntactic ...
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2answers
154 views

Is it correct to use 'present' after a noun or pronoun?

Can an adjective go just after a noun? The teachers present in the hall are my life saviours. In this sentence is using 'present in the hall' right or should I say 'presenting in the hall'?
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0answers
38 views

Should it be “clotted cream scones” or “clotted-cream scones”? [duplicate]

I'm eating clotted cream-covered scones. or I'm eating clotted-cream-covered scones. or I'm eating clotted cream covered scones. Formally, I thought they'd have to be clotted-cream scones, ...
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0answers
74 views

Multiple nouns compounding with the same adjective

What is the correct way of writing resource-intensive and knowledge-intensive in contracted form? Would it be: Resource- and knowledge-intensive? Or: Resource and knowledge-intensive?