Questions tagged [compound-adjectives]

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0answers
40 views

What part of speech do the quoted constructions belong to? [duplicate]

This yoghurt is ... "getting out of these shoes" good "not catching the bouquet" good, "not getting stuck with a groom's man shorter than you" good. I have found no articles on this sort of (it ...
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0answers
12 views

“She isn't a movie-going person” [migrated]

What does "movie-going" mean in this phrase? Can we use the same for other locations like the theater or the stadium? She isn't a movie-going person Source: https://twitter.com/tvs_movies/status/...
2
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0answers
16 views

Why “dog-eats-dog” cannot be a phrasal adjective but “dog-eat-dog” can? [migrated]

Dog eats dog sounds correct but it's not an adjective here. As soon as it becomes an adjective we remove s from eats, Why?
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0answers
8 views

Which is proper, “3 thousand dead” or “3 thousands dead”? [migrated]

I wonder if 3-thousand dead can be rewritten as 3 thousands dead? Are both of them correct? What's the difference between them?
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2answers
50 views

Can a phrasal adjective be placed AFTER a noun? [closed]

If phrasal adjectives can be placed after nouns, what are some examples?
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30 views

Using compound adjectives correctly

Which is correct? He held the three-by-five-black-and-white photo between his fingers... He held the three-by-five black-and-white photo between his fingers... I think the first is correct. The ...
3
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1answer
539 views

Can you put past participle adjectives in plural form?

My teacher said the word 'grownup' can become 'grownups' but if it's written as two separate words 'grown up' with no hyphen it changes into 'growns up'. It doesn't sound right to me and I tried to ...
4
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2answers
77 views

Why do grammars claim that adjective+adjective is always a morphological compound and never a syntactic construction?

According to CGEL (and all other sources I looked at so far, such as Quirk et al. and Biber et al.), the following are morphological compounds, i.e. compound adjectives, and not syntactic composites ...
0
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1answer
61 views

open-minded gramatically

What are constructions like 'open-minded' grammatically? If you say they're paticiples I ask of which verb ('to open-mind' or 'to mind'? With which meaning then? Is there a meaning of 'to mind' like '...
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0answers
29 views

How to construct the -ish form of a compund adjective? [closed]

Will it be yellow-greenish, yellowish-greenish or yellowish-green?
1
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1answer
77 views

Is 'a 210-million-people market' correctly written? [duplicate]

Usually I find compound adjectives quite straightforward, but I'm not so sure when it comes to the following: A 210-million-people market So how should I refer to a market 210 million people large ...
2
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1answer
87 views

Why “well-behaved” instead of “well-behaving”

According to the rules of compound adjectives, the Ving/Ved in "Adv-Ving/Ved" form depends on the original verb in a sentence. For example, "well-liked" comes from "somebody [who] is liked well." In ...
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1answer
53 views

Time indiscrete or Temporally indiscrete

Is the word combination temporally indiscrete or time indiscrete correct adjectives, when describing for instance a system which works on the basis of continuous time (and not discrete time)? I am ...
0
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2answers
37 views

high-energy electrons vs. high-energetic electrons

I am writing some text about a population of electrons with very high energies. Which of the following statement is correct (or "better" as compared to the others): [...] a population of high-energy ...
0
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1answer
36 views

What would an adjective to an adjective be called? [closed]

In the sentence "The very fast dog ran outside.", the words are article (adjective?) adjective noun verb adverb. Would it be correct to say "very" in that sentence is also an adjective word? Or would ...
1
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1answer
23 views

What words or concepts describe how something feels like/ is experienced like for the first time?

I can’t explain myself better than this, but I’m looking for something that describes a first impression, the experience of doing something new for the first time, specially something meaningful. For ...
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0answers
19 views

How do I define a school which has an international licence?

How can I define a school or corporation which has an international licence? Can I use "holder" or is "holder" used for just a person? Which would be correct? Internationally licensed school ...
1
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2answers
96 views

What grammatical role is “blood” playing in the phrase “blood red”?

"Blood red" can be both a noun and an adjective: Blood red is my favourite colour. [noun] The wall was blood red. [adjective] The "blood" is optional in the sense it can be removed without ...
0
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1answer
380 views

Difference between “safe from” vs “safe of” something

When indicating that something is secured from something dangerous it is possible to say that it is safe from something. For example, you might say Properly kept farm animals are safe from ...
0
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2answers
38 views

Is there a word that describes someone with a light footprint? [duplicate]

I need a word to describe someone who lives a happy, purposeful life without needing a lot of resources. The words "light footprint" and "low maintenance" come to mind, but I'd like a word/adjectival ...
1
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1answer
49 views

What does 'fungus-growing' mean?

Renowned Swiss entomologist Martin Luscher described the mounds of this fungus-growing species as being as much as 16 feet tall, 16 feet in diameter at their base, and with a cement-like wall of ...
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0answers
20 views

Are both “6-month follow-up” and “6-months follow-up” correct? [duplicate]

After a quick search it seems that most people would prefer "6-month follow-up". I just wonder if one is correct and one incorrect or if both usage can be justified. I try to understand the logic ...
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0answers
27 views

Compound adjective hyphenation

In the following sentence: Directly substituting all continuous-time components of X by their previously described discrete-time counterparts results in Y because/as [...] I'm unsure if "...
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1answer
62 views

My question is about compounds adjectives

I have been reading archaeological literature in english and some descriptions are constructed with several complex compound adjectives. My question is when you have for example “soft hammer flakes” ...
2
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0answers
27 views

Is there a technique used when someone splits a compound noun into two parts?

My student has asked whether the splitting of the compound word keyhole into key hole is a particular literary technique. I didn't know! It's relevant to the text, as it is about disconnection and ...
0
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1answer
1k views

Do I need the hyphen?

"Part-Time" in the beginning of this sentence is technically a compound adjective to employment, but it is separated by "or temporary." Do I still hyphenate "part-time"? The same question holds for "...
3
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1answer
299 views

spatio or spatial

Searching the Google scholar, "spatio-temporal" returnn 778,000 hits, "spatial-temporal" returns 798,000 hits, "spatial-temporal scales" returns 3,620 hits, "spatio-temporal scales" returns 13,...
2
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3answers
109 views

Is “urban-rural gap” a proper English term for a disparity between urban and rural areas or just a word-for-word translation from Chinese?

I came across this phrase when I was reading a research paper. Here's a quote from the abstract: I find that the urban-rural gap accounts for 40% of mean country inequality and much of its cross-...
2
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2answers
56 views

Why does the adjective “suitable” come after “hands-on activities”?

Please clarify the grammar used in the sentence below. Most museums provide hands-on activities suitable for both children and adults. Question: Why is the adjective "suitable for" placed after ...
2
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3answers
91 views

Looking for a specific synonym of “selfish” [duplicate]

A word or phrase that describes best a specific type of person or their behavior. The type of person that would not act upon a threat if said threat is not affecting their personal well-being directly....
0
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1answer
39 views

Saddle-point problem vs saddle point problem

I work in computer science/applied math, and I frequently see sentences such as "We wish to solve a bilinear saddle point problem." My problem is that this does not seem correct based on my ...
4
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1answer
164 views

10 Year Challenge

The hashtag 10yearchallenge is very trendy now, but the use of the compond adjective (10-year) makes it look like it's a challenge that spanned 10 years, however, it's the name of the challenge not an ...
2
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2answers
95 views

Hyphenation in “first century AD” etc as an adjective

I edit a lot of articles that contain phrases such as "A first century AD inscription..." or "First century BC writer Herodotus..." I know that a compound adjective before a noun is usually hyphenated,...
4
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2answers
144 views

What is the type of an adjective “fed up”

Recently, I stumbled upon a phrase "fed up" in one sentence. On the first glance, I was thinking it should be a phrasal verb but it didn't correlate with the sentence meaning. I found out that it is ...
2
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3answers
497 views

Word or phrase used to describe someone who controls someone else through possessions or financial means

Not sure if such a phrase or word to describe a person/actions actually exists. Have been using “to lord something over someone,” but this might not be the correct usage. ex1: If someone pays for a ...
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3answers
160 views

What word would work as a better substitute for “Stalker”?

Context I am working on a game and one of the Classes in it is "Rogue". (Original, I know.) I'm trying to find a term that accurately describes and can serve as a name for one of the Subclasses. (...
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3answers
80 views

“Typical liberal bulls-t” or “typically liberal bulls-t”?

My liberal friend wrote that he's gonna do some research soon. I asked, "Into what?" "[Redacted.] Typically liberal bullshit," he replied self-depricatingly. Then he corrects himself: "*typical" But ...
2
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2answers
1k views

What is the correct usage of hyphens with ranges (as in “a 5 to 10 minute rest”)?

I'm having issues with figuring out which is correct: "The teacher told the students to take a 5 to 10 minute rest." "The teacher told the students to take a 5-to-10 minute rest." "The teacher told ...
1
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1answer
58 views

definite article 'a'

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, pag 529, says: Predeterminer AdjPs (e.g., such a nuisance, or so serious a problem) occur as external modifier in NP structure, preceding the ...
1
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1answer
376 views

What are the rules surrounding a hyphen following an abbreviation?

For instance, if something is owned by Apple Inc. does that make the compound phrasal adjective 'Apple Inc.-owned'? Or would I omit the period?
1
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4answers
265 views

How does one properly hyphenate compound adjectives that are locations?

Compound adjectives preceding a noun are hyphenated, but how does one properly hyphenate locations? Please include sources. E.g. hyphenated, compound adjective: state-of-the-art technology city, ...
1
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2answers
201 views

Hyphen usage with expressions in compound adjectives

Compound adjectives are hyphenated, e.g. "data-to-field binding". But how is the hyphen used when one of the words in the compound adjective is an expression? For example, how would you hyphenate the ...
1
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1answer
84 views

Is it better to list adjectives, with an “and”? [duplicate]

When we use more than one adjective, e.g. The big, red, bouncy balloon. The list of three adjectives {big, red, and bouncy} is a list, so by rights it should be separated by commas, with an "and" ...
0
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1answer
28 views

Client and server side componets

I'm having a problem to refer to the components that are in both, the client-side and the server-side. I started writing: "client and server-side components" (1) I did that in order to avoid ...
2
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1answer
91 views

hyphenation of compound adjectives [closed]

Proofreading a friend's work, I came across the following phrase: [teachers and students] work collaboratively to change long held, potentially incorrect and deeply believed views Now, while I'm ...
1
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1answer
156 views

Hyphenation of Compound Adjective

Is this correct: Representation of a 4 to 9-node-quadrilateral element? and this: which is the case of a multi-degree of freedom problem?
6
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6answers
636 views

Word for a country that has enough water for drinking, crops, forests, etc

When we refer to a country facing an acute scarcity of water, we use the compound adjective 'water-stressed' for that country. But what do you call a country that has enough water for drinking, crops,...
0
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1answer
188 views

What part of speech is “care” in the following sentences?

Joe is the student with the highest grade With the highest grade is an adjective phrase modifying student, with "with" being a preposition and "highest" being the adjective. But in the following ...
0
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1answer
81 views

Compound Adjectives: Usage after “is” / Usage with noun

I'm currently writing a text in which I have some object called a graph, which has the attribute of being planar in a special way, namely in the multi-level way. I'm pretty certain that I should call ...
1
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2answers
433 views

Can one get away with using the root “surl” from the adjective “surly” in a sentence?

It always strikes me as odd when an adjective that ends in y doesn't have a dictionary defined root noun (funny≈fun; angry≈anger; silly≠sill; etc). More specifically, I'm trying to write a lyric, and ...