Questions tagged [complements]

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20
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1answer
2k views

He died [as?] a broken man

He died a broken man. One of my students came across this sentence in an article, and a quick search for "he died a * man" yields a plethora of similar ones. I'm fairly certain this sentence is ...
13
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2answers
870 views

“has scientists excited” or “has excited scientists”?

I saw the following on the Facebook page of Time. Is "has scientists excited" or the perfect version "has excited scientists" correct? What's the difference if both are correct? The recent ...
11
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3answers
8k views

recommend you + to-infinitive vs recommend that you + infinitive

I'd like to ask about the use of the verb "recommend" in the following sentences: We'd recommend you to book your flight early. The plumber recommended me to buy a new water heater. The first ...
11
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1answer
3k views

How do I determine subject and subject complement in “A side-effect is the spread of commercialese to other domains.”?

Consider this example: Commercialese is an instrument of art, designed to enrich and invigorate our language—surely you will all agree with this—, and we should encourage newcomers to learn ...
9
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3answers
3k views

Is “I am who(m) God made me” grammatical?

SAH asked an interesting question about case, I am [who/whom] G-d made me, but one issue that came up in the comments repeatedly is that many people said that they find the example sentence ...
8
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2answers
20k views

Grammatical complements for “allow”

Are any of these verb phrases grammatical? allows the user of modeling and resolving allows the user to model and resolve Which version of the following sentence is correct/better? ...
7
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3answers
838 views

Verb-Subject Order

Is it optional to front the verb in sentences like the one below when an adverbial precedes? In the film, appear two more girls who think that Dallas is quite rude. I have already checked the ...
7
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1answer
297 views

How tran­si­tiv­ity is de­fined in CGEL

This ques­tion is specif­i­cally for those who are fa­mil­iar with the 2002 edi­tion of The Cam­bridge Gram­mar of the English Lan­guage by Hud­dle­ston and Pul­lum. The book has this pas­sage at ...
6
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2answers
404 views

Similar adjectives to “worth”

This laptop is worth $140. Here worth does not need a following preposition. However, when I say, for example: I am curious about his motivation behind his decision. The word curious is an ...
6
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2answers
1k views

Participial clause?

On ELL a user has asked how to parse the emphasized -ing form in this sentence from Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone: Harry swung at it with the bat to stop it from breaking his nose, and ...
6
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5answers
2k views

Is this an objective complement or adjective phrase?

In ‘catch me off guard’, is the ‘off guard’ an objective complement or adjective phrase that modifies ‘me’? My Great Uncle Algie kept trying to catch me off guard and force some magic out of me &...
6
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3answers
294 views

Is there any difference between ‘it’ and ‘so’ as a complement of ‘she looks’?

D’you – d’you want to go to the ball with me?” said Harry. Why did he have to go red now? Why? “Oh!” said Cho, and she went red too. “Oh Harry, I’m really sorry,” and she truly looked it. “I’ve ...
6
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5answers
3k views

“Who(m) will it be?” vs. “Will it be he/him?”

The accepted (and highly upvoted) answer to the question in the question What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly? states that the easiest way to find out whether to use who or whom is to ...
5
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2answers
2k views

“Heard me [infinitive]” vs. “heard me [present participle]”

"Heard me [infinitive]" vs. "heard me [present participle]" At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talk about it. At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talking about it. At ...
5
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6answers
741 views

In structures such as 'football manager', is 'football' a modifier or a complement of the head noun?

I thought I'd post this as it illustrates a problem often encountered on ELU. In structures such as 'football manager', is 'football' a modifier or a complement of the head noun? I've seen both ...
5
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2answers
2k views

how to understand “as ~ as ever”

Nosey Flynn was sitting up in his usual corner of Davy Byrne's and, when he heard the story, he stood Farrington a half-one, saying it was as (1) smart a thing as (2) ever (3) he heard. (James ...
5
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2answers
192 views

What is the nature of, and syntactic distinction between, modifier and complement?

I am struggling to understand the syntactic relevance of the distinction between complement and modifier in theories such as the one presented in the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by ...
5
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1answer
138 views

Determining licensing in CaGel by means of substitution test

I read a comment on licensing in another post, which made me revisit this concept. Unfortunately I haven't got access to CaGEL – only to its "little brother", Huddleston and Pullum's A Student's ...
5
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2answers
609 views

How to tell if something is a core complement or a non-core complement?

CaGEL on page 216 cite the following: "Kim gave the key to Pat" An NP indirectly related to the verb through the preposition is referred as an oblique. The phrase "to Pat" is a non-core ...
5
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3answers
1k views

Can prepositional phrases be subject complements?

I’m an ESL teacher without much formal training (at this stage). I have however Googled grammar questions many times and been redirected here, so this time I'm actually posting. I’m trying to explain ...
4
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3answers
2k views

To infinitive used after adjective

This question is relatively simple. I don't understand why we never use passive form of to infinitive after the adjective unless the subject is "it". For example: He is difficult to please. ...
4
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4answers
1k views

Is this a predicative adjunct?

At breakfast on Thursday she bored them all stupid with flying tips she'd gotten out of a library book called Quidditch Through the Ages. –– Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone As far as I ...
4
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2answers
1k views

Can adjectives make adjuncts modifying verbs?

Her teeth gleamed white against the tanned skin of her face. It seems ‘white’ is an adjunct modifying gleamed, while it’s not a complement for it’s not necessary to complete the meaning. But I’m ...
4
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4answers
505 views

Complement of digress?

Is there a verb that means "to return from a digression"? The best I can think of is a phrase like "Getting back on topic, . . ."
4
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1answer
346 views

Subject or subject complement

In the sentence "What is it that makes us happy?", is 'what' the subject or the subject complement? Does 'that' refer back to 'it' or to 'What'?
4
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2answers
1k views

Why do these verbs take bare infinitives?

[a] It makes the tree grow. [b] I never heard him speak. I’m wondering why causative and sense verbs (make, hear) license bare infinitives for their complement, instead of taking to infinitives? What ...
4
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1answer
620 views

What distinguishes a predicative complement from an object?

Asked this on ELL but with no answer: What makes be an intransitive verb? How do we know that the analysis of It is me as transitive by tradtional grammars is incorrect? Take for example: 1. I gave ...
3
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5answers
567 views

“There was a man known as the 'Toe Suck Fairy'” — is “there” a complement?

To me, man is the subject and it has two verbs — was and known —, making there a complement. My teacher argued that the verb is "was known".
3
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2answers
6k views

What is an adjectival complement in English?

How can one determine what an adjectival complement is in an English sentence? Are there are any subcategories to this classification? I'd love concrete examples, to help me better understand this ...
3
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2answers
779 views

Why can an adjective be placed after “eat” as in “garlic can be eaten raw”?

Edit note: This question with some good answers does not explain (or ask) why it is an adjective that's used as opposed to an adverb in this type of construction: Is this an objective complement or ...
3
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2answers
632 views

Why can I vary the position of the noun phrase only in certain sentences?

It is possible to say this: It formed inside him an ambition to teach his students all the more. I brought the "inside him" to the front of the noun phrase "an ambition to..." since the ...
3
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3answers
871 views

What is the usage of “in it fat” in this sentence?

I found this sentence: It has in it fat, which gives energy. I can't figure out the usage of the part "in it fat". Can anyone kindly explain it or maybe give some examples please?
3
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2answers
2k views

Complement or object?

I saw him cross the road. Is cross the road the object of saw? Or is it the complement of him?
3
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3answers
657 views

Does “Predicate” includes object, complement and modifiers?

I'm currently studying the "Sentence Structure" for the English language. I've found varied information in this regard. Some sources says that the sentence consist of five components: Subject + ...
3
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1answer
314 views

Is this that-clause a complement?

In that discomfort, breathing quicklime and tar, no one could see very well how from the bowels of the earth there was rising not only the largest house in the town, but the most hospitable and ...
3
votes
1answer
398 views

Is this an adverbial complement? “They led me _to believe that there was no danger_.”

I'm a novice who realised the existence of this site today. The following picture is from Idiomatic and Syntactic English Dictionary by A.S. Hornby: Pattern 10 Verbs marked P 10 may be ...
3
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1answer
248 views

Questions about adverb phrases (or prepositional phrase working as complements)

When there are two adverb phrases of same kind, it is recommended to put the more descriptive one in the front. But this people used and in between those adverb phrases. My room was in the ship ...
3
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1answer
279 views

Complements and adjuncts

Paul Austen’s novel sold immediately to the author’s eager readers. In the above sentence, which part is the complement and which is the adjunct? I am confused as to whether the adjunct should be ...
3
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0answers
703 views

Does a complement phrase always follow a be verb? [closed]

Summary question Is there a formal name for the entire portion of a sentence that is connected to the copula?" Is it "complement"? Background Be verb can be followed by various things: a noun (He ...
3
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1answer
2k views

adverbs modifying noun phrases and licensing their own complements

[i] Harry looked down at his empty gold plate. He had only just realized how hungry he was. The pumpkin pasties seemed ages ago. (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) [ii] Albus Dumbledore had ...
3
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1answer
71 views

Is 'to smoke' a complement or adjunct in this sentence?

I hope you are all well. He stopped to smoke. Is to smoke a complement of stop or is it an infinitive-of-purpose adjunct?
3
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5answers
818 views

A coffee to go…( for syntax experts)

Could the infinitive phrase "to go" be a complement of the noun phrase "a coffee"?
2
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2answers
24k views

Correct or correctly: “I got them all correct / correctly”?

I just answered a battery of test questions, and posted the following comment: "I got them all correctly." Should I have said "I got them all correct."?
2
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2answers
759 views

Participial Phrases As Objective Complement

Can a participial phrase be used as an objective complement? If so, is there a way to tell when the participial phrase is or is not used as an objective complement? How would this sentence be ...
2
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1answer
429 views

Correct usage of infinitives

I am not sure about the usage of infinitives in this sentence: Finally, one of the accused confessed to have forged the director's signature on the report. Could anyone explain correct usage?
2
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1answer
600 views

Is the prepositional phrase possibly called a subject complement?

Russet leaves were swept by past winds in heaps. (Original sentence: "Russet leaves, swept by past winds in heaps."— Jane Eyre) ‘In heaps’ can be called as a ‘positional’ complement for verb ...
2
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2answers
454 views

“end up” peculiar properties

Just putting together a lexical lesson on making life changes and thought I'd use a sentence with 'end up'. However, when I ran through various sample sentences I noticed that it is quite an unusual ...
2
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1answer
667 views

Is this mixture of plural and singular legitimate?

But what is most important for our purposes is that these changes were the signal for the resumption of historical debate on a grand scale, of the kind that had been suspended or driven ...
2
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2answers
1k views

Can object complements make any difference to sentences?

I'm reading a grammar book, and I have some questions. A. We ate the fish raw. I want Sue drunk. I prefer the music soft. I like coffee black. We drank the beer cold. This type of ...
2
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1answer
167 views

Use of “confess” when followed by interrogative clause (e.g. I confessed to my parents what I ate last night)

I am not a native speaker, but just wondering if you can use a non-why question as the embedding clause of confess. a. I confessed to my wife why I started smoking again. (Pretty sure this one ...