Questions tagged [complements]

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19 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
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292 views

How tran­si­tiv­ity is de­fined in CGEL

This ques­tion is specif­i­cally for those who are fa­mil­iar with the 2002 edi­tion of The Cam­bridge Gram­mar of the English Lan­guage by Hud­dle­ston and Pul­lum. The book has this pas­sage at ...
4
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1answer
619 views

What distinguishes a predicative complement from an object?

Asked this on ELL but with no answer: What makes be an intransitive verb? How do we know that the analysis of It is me as transitive by tradtional grammars is incorrect? Take for example: 1. I gave ...
3
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1answer
71 views

Is 'to smoke' a complement or adjunct in this sentence?

I hope you are all well. He stopped to smoke. Is to smoke a complement of stop or is it an infinitive-of-purpose adjunct?
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0answers
491 views

Are copulars considered linking, helping, or auxiliaries?

I'm having a hard time understanding why most people consider the infinitive to be and all of its verb base forms helping verbs. I've consulted multiple English grammar sites and forums, and most of ...
2
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1answer
82 views

I am confused with usage about 'the' and object complement

Is the sentence as below correct in grammar? And is it clear enough? Please copy & paste keyword, mykeyword, into the search box of Google Play Store app or website to locate this pure app ...
2
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1answer
396 views

What is the grammar structure? “I am not going to stand here watching you do it”?

Is this sentence correct? I am not going to stand here watching you do it. I saw it in an article. If it is - and I think it is - why is "watching" a gerund? What is the grammar structure? Is it a ...
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0answers
48 views

Why aren't degree modifiers complements?

As far as I've been able to figure out, in the CaGEL* framework, complements are items that are licensed by some other element (generally the head), so that if an item has to be licensed, it is per ...
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0answers
49 views

Function of PPs with predicative complements

According to CaGEL* (e.g. p.636 ff), prepositions can take predicative complements, as in [1] She worked as a waitress [2] He passed for dead [3] I took you for granted [4] They left him for ...
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0answers
238 views

Is there such a thing as the “indirect complement” of a noun?

CaGEL* explains the concept of "indirect complements" on page 443 as follows: If it's the complement of a noun, be it direct or indirect, it's part of a noun phrase (NP) headed by the noun, right? So,...
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0answers
114 views

syntactic analysis of a phrase with FROM…TO

In the sentence Everything we do, from eating and ice cream to crossing the Atlantic and from baking a loaf to writing a novel, involves the use of coal, directly or indirectly. I can't come ...
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0answers
59 views

Is “with Trevor” in “dined with Trevor” adjunct or complement?

We dined with Trevor the following Monday. I'm doing a test to figure out whether the constituent "with Trevor" is an adjunct or complement to the verb "dine". It is called the "did so" test as some ...
1
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1answer
262 views

Is the definite/indefinite article a complement or a modifier of a noun?

The definite/indefinite article -- the/a(n) -- always comes before a noun and can never be used without a noun. Is the definite/indefinite article a complement or a modifier of a noun?
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36 views

How to determine if a complement is a predicative complement or a locative complement?

(1) She is out and will be back in soon. (2) She is out and will be conscious soon. Is out a locative complement in (1) but a predicative complement in (2)? If so, is the distinction between ...
0
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1answer
75 views

participles as object complements

Can participles or participial phrases serve as object complements in traditional grammar? And are direct objects viewed as a type of complement in traditional grammar? I'd appreciate reference to ...
0
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1answer
52 views

Object or complement with “have”

Take the following sentence: "He has blue eyes" Does "blue eyes" act as an object or a complemet? Would the answer be different in a sentence such as:
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378 views

“the fact that…” grammatical construction

In the following sentence: The issue is the fact that it is red. What type of grammatical form is "that it is red"? I think that it is some kind of noun clause that functions as an objective ...
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24 views

lead to vs relocate

I read "lead many companies to relocate in rural areas (1)" This is typo ? We can make a complete sentence " The government leads many companies to relocate in rural areas " I have a doubt that " ...
0
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1answer
102 views

What is the function of “for more productivity” on this sentence?

rapid population increases drive the search for more productivity. What is the function of "for more productivity"? is it a complement or an adverbial? Thank you!
-1
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1answer
71 views

How to Discern an Asyndetic Coordinate Subject Complement?

". . .to let fall is absolute indifference, absolute contempt;" I think this got maybe discerned an asyndetic coordinate subject complement. May something like He was a moody man, his temper was ...