Questions tagged [complements]

For questions about the use of, or meaning of, complements.

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1 vote
2 answers
83 views

Was this subject complement diagrammed correctly?

The sentence is the following. I'm focusing on the part in bold: Feeding the goats is messy and time consuming. It's in this book. The author provides the following diagram: And I think it should ...
1 vote
2 answers
218 views

Indirect complement or postmodifier in a noun phrase

In the sentence [1] He is the most talented artist (that) I know what is (that) I know in terms of function – an indirect complement, licensed by most, or simply a common postmodifier? Why? Similarly, ...
6 votes
2 answers
487 views

Similar adjectives to "worth"

This laptop is worth $140. Here worth does not need a following preposition. However, when I say, for example: I am curious about his motivation behind his decision. The word curious is an ...
6 votes
3 answers
2k views

To infinitive used after adjective

This question is relatively simple. I don't understand why we never use passive form of to infinitive after the adjective unless the subject is "it". For example: He is difficult to please. ...
3 votes
0 answers
144 views

Structure and usage of the construction - BE of

I have seen various sentences like this: The availability of two reasonably complete mammalian genomes is of great help to gene finders. - The New York Times I do my utmost to dress the actors very ...
2 votes
1 answer
251 views

Is an object of a verb a complement of a verb or of a verb phrase (a predicate)?

a. I love you. Here, you is the object of the verb love. It's also a complement, because it completes the meaning of the sentence. Per Wikipedia, complement is defined as: In grammar, a ...
1 vote
0 answers
47 views

As if as though

I am having a problem identifing which gramatical function as if (as though, like) has As far as I know After linking verbs, we have noun/ noun phrase/ noun clause and adjective/ adjective phrase ...
1 vote
0 answers
78 views

Is 'there' a locative complement in this example?

[1] He was the only one there. In this sentence, 'the only one there' is an example of a predicative complement (subject complement), a predicative nominal. However, inside this noun phrase, we have ...
13 votes
1 answer
924 views

"has scientists excited" or "has excited scientists"?

I saw the following on the Facebook page of Time. Is "has scientists excited" or the perfect version "has excited scientists" correct? What's the difference if both are correct? The recent ...
0 votes
1 answer
69 views

To help and gerund clauses

I've reached an impasse with my girlfriend (both non-native speakers) about this sentence she used: Maybe we didn't have enough of it for it to become routine again and help measuring time To me, ...
0 votes
1 answer
41 views

How to analyze e.g., "The man had trouble finding shoes to fit"

In a sentence like "The man had trouble finding shoes to fit," how might "had trouble finding shoes to fit" be analyzed? Is this like a direct object ("trouble") and ...
2 votes
1 answer
157 views

predicative complement vs predicative adjunct

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 250) has this passage: Here, Od is Direct Object, and Oi is Indirect Object. It seems that CGEL is saying that almost raw in [i-ii] and fiendishly ...
1 vote
0 answers
56 views

What is the constituent type of 'laugh' in 'I saw her laugh'?

Could someone explain to me the constituent type of “laugh” as in “I saw her laugh”? Best with an X-bar graph. I know it's a lot of trouble. You don't have to draw the whole thing, a simplified ...
11 votes
4 answers
4k views

Is "I am who(m) God made me" grammatical?

SAH asked an interesting question about case, I am [who/whom] G-d made me, but one issue that came up in the comments repeatedly is that many people said that they find the example sentence ...
0 votes
3 answers
344 views

What exactly falls under the label of "complement"?

There seems to be a lot of contradicting beliefs out there regarding complements and what they cover -- or maybe I am just confusing myself. However, I cannot seem to find an answer that I understand. ...
1 vote
0 answers
46 views

Does the sentence "I need you to make these calls for me" contain an object complement?

I'm currently working on my paper and predicative constructions confuse me so much. The book I use tells that object complements can follow the verbs of wish & intention, but there was no word ...
6 votes
5 answers
2k views

In ‘catch me off guard’, is the ‘off guard’ an objective complement or adjective phrase?

In ‘catch me off guard’, is the ‘off guard’ an objective complement or adjective phrase that modifies ‘me’? My Great Uncle Algie kept trying to catch me off guard and force some magic out of me &...
3 votes
1 answer
77 views

Indirect complement or extraposed subject?

Is the content clause ('that she saw him commit the crime') in the following sentence an extraposed subject or an indirect complement* licensed by 'so'? It just so happens that she saw him commit the ...
1 vote
0 answers
53 views

agreement of the subject complement with the subject

A colleague of mine asked me, "Can we say 'My favorite food is hamburgers.'" I said of course it is correct. But she said a native speaker says it is wrong. It should be "My favorite ...
0 votes
0 answers
44 views

On the arguments of 'put'

I have noticed that the verb 'put' usually takes a direct object and a (typically) prepositional, non-core complement, as in: He put the book on the shelf Sometimes, the prepositional complement is ...
0 votes
0 answers
56 views

What is the difference between a predicate nominative/predicate adjectives and a subject complement?

For example, the sentence "John was a policeman" or "Ben was angry." Both describe the subject, so I'd call them subject complements. But they could also be a predicate nominative ...
0 votes
2 answers
75 views

Omissibility of "to be" before Noun or Adjective [duplicate]

I have heard that cognitive verbs such as 'think, believe, consider, suppose, understand, imagine...etc.' should use 'to be + noun' or 'to be + adjective' in the object complement. She believed him ...
0 votes
0 answers
77 views

Adjective placed before a noun but adjectival complement after it

Page 14 of Practical English Usage reads In some cases an adjective can be put before a noun and its complement after it. This happens with different, similar, the same, next, last, first, second etc;...
0 votes
3 answers
126 views

What is the grammatical topic of this shortening technique?

Extracted from an English cloze test: .....these virtual selves exist in the same online spaces that many people use every day. And this is a new and unfamiliar phenomenon that some people might ...
0 votes
0 answers
45 views

Noun adjuncts or complements? [duplicate]

I asked a question regarding PP complements the other day and I believe I now have a better handle on that. But I am still scratching my head over this paragraph from CGEL: Within the category of ...
1 vote
2 answers
127 views

Multi-layer prepositional phrase

I am having trouble picturing the structure of this preposition phrase from the point of view of generative syntax (PP) My attempt to run it down goes like this: from (preposition) + the point of ...
2 votes
2 answers
117 views

Is 'the course' a complement or an adjunct in 'Stay the course'?

Stay the course is a fixed expression, but I'd like to know how to analyze the course. At first blush, it seems to be complement of the verb stay. But then, you have a similar-looking example stay ...
1 vote
0 answers
59 views

How can I tell if a prepositional phrase is a complement to a noun or a modifier? And how are these two different?

In the NP "mines in wartime", "in wartime" modifies the head "mines". that nice tall man from Canada whom you met "from Canada" modifies "man". But ...
1 vote
2 answers
139 views

Grammar rule: ONE sentence; ONE subject, ONE predicate. Is it?

I just watched a video on grammar (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Drv6jD8xWdw) that states that English sentences can only have one subject. At first, I thought it was obvious, but then I thought of ...
1 vote
1 answer
95 views

Preparatory it; not possible for complements

I was reading Practical English Usage, by Michael Swan and got into something that has got me deeply confused. It basically says that preparatory it can be used as a preparatory subject or object, but ...
0 votes
0 answers
42 views

What are the subjects, objects, complements and gerunds in this sentence?

As with most great avant artists, it’s easier to describe how Arca makes you feel than what it is, exactly, she makes. Just wanted clarification on a few things. What is the first part of the ...
3 votes
3 answers
118 views

Is 'to smoke' a complement or adjunct in this sentence?

I hope you are all well. He stopped to smoke. Is to smoke a complement of stop or is it an infinitive-of-purpose adjunct?
0 votes
1 answer
47 views

What are the objects and indirect objects in this sentence (if any)

The storage making your home work harder. It's from a furniture advertisement, and I was just wondering how to dissect the complements here. Is it that storage is the subject, making is the verb, ...
19 votes
1 answer
3k views

He died [as?] a broken man

He died a broken man. One of my students came across this sentence in an article, and a quick search for "he died a * man" yields a plethora of similar ones. I'm fairly certain this ...
-1 votes
1 answer
401 views

participles as object complements

Can participles or participial phrases serve as object complements in traditional grammar? And are direct objects viewed as a type of complement in traditional grammar? I'd appreciate reference to ...
0 votes
3 answers
154 views

That-clause in "it seems that"

Is the that-clause in the following sentence a predicative complement or a displaced subject with it being the dummy subject? It seemed that he was correct. My understanding is that if the that-...
-1 votes
1 answer
115 views

What is the function of "for more productivity" on this sentence?

rapid population increases drive the search for more productivity. What is the function of "for more productivity"? is it a complement or an adverbial? Thank you!
1 vote
0 answers
61 views

What is the nature of That-complementizer here?

It was in 1945 that World World 2 ended. I think that is a complementizer, but I'm not sure of the nature of this complement. By nature I mean the part of speech of the complement clause and to what ...
1 vote
1 answer
60 views

Which of the following sentences uses a subject complement? [closed]

What about C, isn't a bit anxious about the test tomorrow also a subject complement following the linking verb am?
1 vote
2 answers
170 views

Is it possible to have a "noun or noun phrase" as object/subject complement in "Depictive or Resultative" construction?

A sentence containing ditransitive verb can have two objects. In the ditransitive verbs a subcategory, as it is described in some of the articles, usually called "Attributive ditransitive verbs&...
0 votes
0 answers
49 views

Can a Noun or Noun phrase ever be Secondary Predicate complement or adjunct?

1 She drank the coffee [hot] - adjective The winter froze the Lake [solid]-adjective Sam painted the wall [green] - adjective The boy delivered the package [wet] - adjective She sells them [new] - ...
2 votes
0 answers
38 views

Analyzing the verb “to head”

This is both a usage question and a grammatical analysis question. I am familiar with complex transitive verbs, such as "to place", where one has to have at least one complement, besides the ...
5 votes
4 answers
3k views

Can prepositional phrases be subject complements?

I’m an ESL teacher without much formal training (at this stage). I have however Googled grammar questions many times and been redirected here, so this time I'm actually posting. I’m trying to explain ...
3 votes
2 answers
225 views

Omitting "by" preposition and the resulted phrase

Consider the following examples: I paid for it by using my credit card. I was in contact with my friends by sending letters. I learned how to dance by watching online videos if I remove the ...
0 votes
1 answer
259 views

Grammar of sentence "He helps people find happiness"? Object Complement or Indirect object?

He helps people find happiness. Is this an example of an Indirect Object (People) or an Object Complement (find happiness)?
1 vote
1 answer
315 views

Object or complement with "have"

Take the following sentence: "He has blue eyes" Does "blue eyes" act as an object or a complemet? Would the answer be different in a sentence such as:
0 votes
1 answer
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Temporal Participial Phrases

He lay staring into the sky. He came running towards me. He arrived finding nobody there. I have read this by John Lawler but am struggling to put these into one of the five categories he mentioned. ...
2 votes
2 answers
43k views

it's important that he... -- it's important for him to

I'm always struggling with these structures: 1) It's important/vital/essential that + subject + (should +) verb It's vital that you (should) do exactly as I say. It's important that they (should) ...
1 vote
2 answers
53 views

Grammar analysis: why is "Fufu" in the following sentence object complement rather than direct object

I called my pug Fufu: subject...object...object complement(Introducing English Grammar, p.93) Yet if I say: I give my pug some water. then pug would be indirect object and some water would be ...
1 vote
1 answer
562 views

Is a determiner a complement or a modifier of a noun?

The determiner such as the definite/indefinite article can come before a noun. Is the determiner a complement or a modifier of a noun?