Questions tagged [comparatives]

The form of an adjective or adverb used to compare two or more things. English comparatives are formed with the suffixes -er/-est or the words more/most.

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7answers
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What is the comparative of “I am broke”?

I am broke In slang it means to be without money, but how would I say (facetiously) that my economic situation is worse today? a. I am broker today b. I am more broke today Solution b) ...
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Is it incorrect to use “more gentle”?

Most dictionaries list "gentler" as the comparative form of "gentle", but "more gentle" also sounds correct. According to this forum post, it is.
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3answers
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Late “latter” last

PREMISE: I am not asking about the difference in meaning or usage between latter and later; it is, therefore, not a duplicate of the older question: what is the difference between later and latter? ...
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2answers
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“More thicker hair”? Is it correct to use 'more' with comparative adjectives?

I was watching a YouTube video the other day and I found a sentence that intrigued me. The woman, Jessica Vill, was talking about her wig collection and when describing one of the wigs she said ...
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2answers
511 views

Can I say “I have two pens less”, and “I have two dollars less”? [closed]

There were 50 students in class. The teacher gave out 50 pens to the students (the students got a total of 50 pens). The teacher gave 50 pens to every student (every student got fifty pens each). ...
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1answer
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'as much as' VS 'more than'

Please, help me. I am so confused with my English task. Very few books are read ___ Harry Potter by children. a) as much as b) more than c) the most   Very few channels are watched ...
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3answers
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“…nicer than any other…” vs “…as nice as any other…”

On a practice test, this sentence was given with the instructions to select the correct version: The English teacher, Mrs. Jensen, is nicer than any teacher in the whole school. This is obviously ...
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1answer
109 views

Idiomatic way of implying “by a multiplicative factor”

I was told that saying A equals B within a factor C is not correct. Is it true? My interlocutor, who is not a native anglophone, told me that "within" cannot be used in such a way, arguing that "[....
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Word Order and Comparative

Consider the different locations of the subject, adjective, and conjunction in the following sentences. A boy as trim as Bob should be a fast runner. As trim a boy as Bob should be a fast ...
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1answer
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How to write comparative sentences?

I have some problem in comparative sentence. For example: In lower layer PS=10% In upper layer PS=5% For this I wrote the sentence as below: In lower layer PS is greater than upper ...
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1answer
47 views

few/fewer (Fewer birds came this year.) [closed]

Fewer birds came this year. Does the above sentence say that more birds came last year than this year? Could someone please explain whether the comparative adjective,'fewer' actually describes 'this ...
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3answers
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What is the scope of “more” when making a list of comparatives?

Lets assume I have an object X of which I want to say (1) it's more important than Y and (2) it's smaller than Y (Y is left implicit in the examples.) If I say X is more important before saying X is ...
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2answers
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Is “not at all very good” correct usage?

When I submitted my Sociology M.Phil study proposal, the adviser wrote in the comments section: Very good in theory, not at all very good in practice. That sounds odd. What creates dissonance is ...
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1answer
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Idiom for as flat as [closed]

Could someone please show me any word or phrase that could fit with as flat as _______ . Grammar is important.
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1answer
320 views

Preference of “cheaper and more efficient” over “more efficient and cheaper”

Would "cheaper and more efficient" be ever so slightly preferred over "more efficient and cheaper"? The same goes with "more", and any other pair/group of comparatives, of which one uses "more" or "...
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1answer
145 views

Is “healthierly” a word? As in “I've been eating healthierly lately” [closed]

I've been hearing people say: I've been eating healthier lately. This sounds like bad grammar to me. The word "healthier" is an adjective, so it should modify a noun, but in this sentence, the ...
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How usual are the comparative sentences like “the number of those under 6 years of age is higher than of those over 70”

I found the following sentences in Corpus of Contemporary American English. (1)the number of those under 6 years of age is higher than of those over 70. (2)the population density of Nuer ...
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2answers
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What is the comparative form of “tense”?

According to Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary and Macmillian English Dictionary, the comparative form of "tense" should be "tenser", but I find such an example in Oxford Dictionary: "The ...
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1answer
672 views

Negative sentence, more than or no more than

Between the following couple of sentences, which one is right? Or better ask, which one is more right if both are right. A: A keyword can not contain more than three words. B: A keyword can contain ...
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3answers
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What do “the more” and “the less” modify in “The more our knowledge of things is certain and particular, the less it is possible for us to feign”?

The following is an excerpt from The Young Spinoza: A Metaphysician in the Making. (1) The more our knowledge of things is certain and particular, the less it is possible for us to feign; What do ...
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1answer
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The precise meaning of “to have something more to do with somebody/something”?

There are other questions about the meaning of "to have something to do with somebody/something". My question here is about "to have something more to do with somebody/something". There is a sense of ...
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2answers
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“more of” vs “more than” [closed]

I read a sentence somewhere: "To make matters worse, the power fluctuation caused two reactors at the San Onofre nuclear power station to shut down. That cut off even more of San Diego's power supply....
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Good A, better B?

If I want to say a line meaning John is a good husband. And he is even better as a father. is it correct to lose ‘even’ and ‘as’? So the sentences will be like 1) John is a good husband. And ...
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adjective or comparative adjective for measurements and rates

I was going some through articles about fitness and I encountered these two sentences. Lifting lighter weights often means you're able to perform more repetitions for each exercise you complete ...
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4answers
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“no younger than I am” or “no more young than I am”? [closed]

"No _____er" or "No more _______" or both? I've come across this construction "He is no more (adjective) than I am" more than once, and there are at least two forums on the Internet where the subject ...
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1answer
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Comparative and Superlative adjectives

I was taught that more beautiful is a comparative adjective. But when I think about it, wouldn't more be an adverb and beautiful be an adjective?
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1answer
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comparative adjectives without reference to another term

The fact that children's ideas about science form part of a larger framework of ideas mean that it is easier to change them. (This sentence is Question 4 from Link I found the similar questions to ...
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1answer
362 views

Make a contrast using “not”

I want to make a contrast in the following question. Transfer the storage manager to the domain layer as far as interaction with the local storage - is its responsibility, not the view-layer. I ...
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1answer
616 views

not so much [adjective] as [other adjective]

I know that the construction "It is not so much funny as interesting" is valid if I want to talk about something that is both funny and interesting, but with an element of comparison. Is it still ...
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1answer
280 views

Is “ him” correct in the sentence “ I solved the question more quickly than him”? [duplicate]

Is " him" correct in the sentence " I solved the question more quickly than him" ? Very often, I see 'objective case' being used. Shouldn't there be the nominative case of pronoun (he) ?
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Usage of “better” and “than” in: “I like the Christmas tree better than her” [closed]

What is wrong with the following sentence? I like the Christmas tree better than her. When I said it I wanted to emphasize that I don't like her and that I think the Christmas tree is better than ...
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2answers
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What does “But it's no more the negroes than I can fly” mean?

The following extract appears in Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee: They are all trying to tell me in some weird, echoing way that it's all on account of the Negroes… but it's no more the Negroes ...
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1answer
339 views

What is the correct comparative and superlative expression for “I would like”?

Is there any comparative expression that belongs straight to the non-comparative expression "I would like" - something like good, better, the best? I always think of "I'd rather" but is it incorrect ...
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1answer
196 views

Comparative adjectives in general, stand-alone use (meaning slightly)

Can a comparative adjective mean 'slightly', 'kind of', without actually referring to another term? The understanding of longer texts is necessary for an C1 certificate. Meaning that you need to ...
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0answers
42 views

“10 lines LESS than the screen height” or “10 lines FEWER than the screen height” [duplicate]

When we measure the screen height by number of lines, should we say 10 lines less than the screen height or 10 lines fewer than the screen height ? The second sentence seems correct for me, ...
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3answers
228 views

Should there be a comma between “every scrap” in the sentence below?

The following is a sentence I read in a novel called Amy Snow: I will carry out her wishes in death every scrap as faithfully as I did when she was with me. The every scrap part confuses me — isn'...
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0answers
58 views

Can “harder” be used when the base case is null?

I'm mostly concerned with being able to say "I should try harder" when I'm currently not trying at all. This seems right to me, but other similar situations like "I should jump higher" if I'm not ...
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1answer
153 views

“How truer” vs. “How much truer”

Which sentence is grammatical? If both sentences are grammatical, which sounds more idiomatic? How much truer and kinder an act of giving is when one gives away what you need. or How truer ...
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1answer
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Comparative of 'smart' where more than one adjective is involved

Related link: My answer to One answer to a Q. is suited to ELL, but the other answer is suited to EL&U on ELU Meta. In the course of an argument, Rathony said the following: I would answer, ...
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1answer
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Why do superlative adverbs sometimes use 'the'?

"He ran the fastest." 'the fastest' is an adverb here, not a noun, so why does it use the definite article 'the'? We could say "He ran fastest", and that works fine too. If we say "He is the fastest ...
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0answers
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“He is no different than you and I” or “He is no different than you and me” [duplicate]

I have no difficulty in normal cases knowing whether to say "you and I"or "You and me." But this situation confuses me. On one hand, I can justify I by saying there is an implied "are" at the end: ...
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1answer
122 views

What is the correct comparative placement of “more”?

When using comparative statements, does it have to be: It is more that they were too afraid to fight than that they were lacking skills. or could it be like this: It is that they ...
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3answers
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What are the best words to describe subjects being compared?

I tried to Google this but no luck so far. I was wondering if there was proper words to describe the comparison of 2 subjects? The first subject would be the object being compared in relation to the ...
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1answer
486 views

Why “respect you most” instead of “respect you more” in the following quote by Samuel Johnson?

"Go into the street and give one man a lecture on morality and another a shilling, and see which will respect you most." British Literature 1640-1789 I can't figure out why Johnson used "most" ...
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1answer
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An alternative term for 'lesser time'

I have two processes running with different speeds. In other words, one of them requires lesser time. I think 'Lesser time' is an awkward term. Is there any good alternative or synonym which I can use ...
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1answer
144 views

Using subjunctive form in Comparative-Correlatives

Is it possible to use subjunctive form in a comparative correlative (The+the) clause? For example, is the below sentence correct? The closer the objects be to each-other, the more beautiful the ...
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1answer
65 views

the meaning of 'case' in this sentence

I don't understand the meaning of case in this sentence: That may be wise policy, but it will also create an impression that many more potential problems exist than is the case. I also don't know ...
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2answers
546 views

comparative phrase 'more than'

I don't know the meaning of the phrase in this sentence We are seldom exposed only to a single contaminant in the environment-but more often than not to a cocktail of chemical mixture. How to ...
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1answer
82 views

Old or older people

Which is grammatically correct? Old people are often lonely. Or Older people are often lonely. I understand context matters. I just want to know when it is right to use one or the other.
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1answer
543 views

Definite Article in front of the word 'better' [duplicate]

Is it wrong to have 'the' in front of the word 'better'? Can someone help me sort this confusion out? Case in point: "Ella is the better of the two sisters" vs "Ella is the best of the two sisters". ...