Questions tagged [comparatives]

The form of an adjective or adverb used to compare two or more things. English comparatives are formed with the suffixes -er/-est or the words more/most.

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3answers
297 views

“Move slower” vs. “move less”

What is the proper word to fill the blank? The more cars there are on a given road, the __ the traffic will move. The answer is slower. But I wonder whether less is incorrect.
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1answer
8k views

“Less fast” vs. “less faster” [closed]

Which one is correct? He runs less fast than I. He runs less faster than I.
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1answer
8k views

“than do I” vs. “than I do” [duplicate]

I need grammatical explanations for the following two sentence structures: The mistakes children make in learning to speak tell linguists more about how children learn language than do the ...
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0answers
74 views

“Taller than me” or “taller than I”? [duplicate]

Which one is correct here and why? He is taller than me. He is taller than I.
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1answer
1k views

Most is adjective or adverb, comparative or superlative in the following phrase?

In the following phrase, from the 1971 film "The Devils" by Ken Russell, what is "most"? An adjective or an adverb? And in what form, comparative or superlative? I conjure thee, most frightful ...
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1answer
17k views

“more close to” [closed]

For this sentence, By allowing the customization of user interface, the user interface are more close to the need of user, since every user has different style of preferences. Is it correct to use ...
5
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1answer
1k views

Use of comparative degree when no comparison is being done

I have studied in my academics that we can use comparative degree when comparison is being done. But today I came across use of comparative degree without any comparison. Is it correct to use ...
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2answers
4k views

Is the account balance “less” or “smaller” when we compare two amounts?

Your current account balance is $X smaller/less than is required I have read that when we are talking about amount we say small amount. So in my case what word would be right to use?
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1answer
511 views

meaning and usage of “in order the more” [closed]

I have just come across a phrase I have never seen before: I do not so in order to undermine the status of xy but, on the contrary, in order the more securely to identify certain aspects. A quick ...
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3answers
28k views

Differences between “audio” and “sound”?

What is the difference between "audio" and "sound"? Is it possible that a beeping noise could be considered one but not the other?
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2answers
5k views

Is “faster speed”, “faster performance” correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is 'low speed' finally proving its merit? Recently in a mayor presentation of upcoming product I saw slide talking about "faster performance". Then in BBC article ...
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2answers
2k views

-er rather than -lier as an adverbial comparative form

In modern German, one can make tief into the comparative tiefer, regardless of whether the word is used as adjective or adverb. In English, I now have a sentence in which I want to do the same thing ...
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1answer
3k views

Then or Than, Which to use when comparing time? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it absolutely necessary to use “than” over “then” in a comparison? Which sentence is grammatically correct? "I have been here for less then six ...
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1answer
315 views

Best way to represent comparative information in paragraph form?

Let's say normally I have a table, and the left hand column has a requirement in it, and the right hand column has how the requirement is fulfilled. But because of a lack of support for tables, I ...
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4answers
288 views

X are equivalent to Y in Z

I'm pretty new to English StackExchange, and English is not my first language, so I'm not even sure what tags to look for. So, I apologize if this has been discussed before. I'm writing up a blog and ...
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6answers
1k views

Mass nouns and counts nouns. Does getting it wrong ever matter?

Less/fewer, too much/too many, amount/number... When people get these things wrong, it bugs me. But I cannot think of a situation where mistaking a mass noun for a count noun (or vice versa) would ...
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6answers
3k views

“More perfect” versus “less imperfect”

"More perfect" is presumably bad English (Preamble to the US Constitution notwithstanding), since something is either perfect (and thus can't be improved) or not. "Less imperfect", however, seems ...
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2answers
1k views

Can any adjective be used as comparative?

I was talking with my friends the other day about what is heathy to eat, I brought up the fact that something can be healthy if you compare it to something that is not healthy. You could say a ...
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5answers
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Is “such a cooler” proper English?

I'm trying to say something like "that's such a cooler design". Is there more valid expression that expresses the same thing? Or is this okay English? I guess "that design is so much cooler" would ...
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3answers
1k views

Is it incorrect to use non-comparative adjectives while comparing two things?

Is it required to use comparative adjectives while comparing two things like this? Wireless networks, compared to wired networks, suffer from slow(er) connection speed, long(er) delay, and (more) ...
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1answer
1k views

Rules for single-word comparatives and superlatives [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “More clear” vs “Clearer”, when to use “more” instead of “-er” Are there any rules for which words are allowed to have -er and -...
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4answers
10k views

“Younger” or “youngest”

I came across an odd-looking usage in the paper today... The wife of President Assad listens to her husband yesterday with her two younger children The sentence suggests that she has some other ...
5
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3answers
2k views

comparative construction used with pronouns, especially 'her'

I was recently pulled up by a colleague when I made a statement along the lines of I am a better player than her. My colleague suggested the correct statement should be better player than she is ...
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2answers
2k views

Justification of “more perfect” [closed]

I've just read this interesting article. We were being constantly told back in school years that we couldn't use "more" to modify "perfect". I kept feeling guilty using "more perfect" until I read ...
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2answers
913 views

Do I need to use comparative degree?

Maybe it's a little long story. Maybe it's a little longer story.
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0answers
242 views

“Prefer tea to/over coffee” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct: “prefer X to Y” or “prefer X over Y”? Which is correct? I prefer tea to coffee. I prefer tea over coffee.
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5answers
6k views

The comparative of “environmentally friendly”

When using the comparative with environmentally friendly would it be correct to say environmentally friendlier, or more environmentally friendly?
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2answers
793 views

“At least as much as skilled as”

Is this sentence right? Xs need to be at least as much as skilled as Ys. If not what should it be?
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12answers
67k views

What is the difference between “quicker” and “faster”?

What is the correct word to use here and why: I will get there quicker [than you] vs. I will get there faster [than you] There must be similar adverbs for "slower".
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1answer
189 views

“Are you happier?”

I was reading an English book. This is a snippet of a conversation below: But please tell us... do you like your job? Are you happier? I am confused at happier. Why not use happy?
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2answers
1k views

Omitted words in a comparison

The moon was smaller than yesterday. Is this correct, and the "how large it was" was just omitted and implied, as in The moon was smaller than (how large it was) yesterday. or is this a faulty ...
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1answer
48k views

What's the comparative for the word “modern”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “More clear” vs “Clearer”, when to use “more” instead of “-er” What's the comparative for the word modern?
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1answer
462 views

Am I right using “as” for equality and “than” to point out differences?

I would like to know whether I am right when I use "as" meaning: similar, equal or equivalent, and the comparative, "than", to point out a difference between the nouns.
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0answers
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Using superlatives for comparing two things [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Use of the superlative when only two items are present Is it strictly incorrect to use the superlative when comparing only two things? i.e. I have two sisters. Mary is the ...
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3answers
187 views

Is “more mainstream” a valid thing to write?

I'm writing a report talking about how a certain technique in my field has become 'more mainstream', but that phrase looks rather wrong. Is it a valid thing to say? Can something become "more ...
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2answers
2k views

Multiple comparatives of different types: how to choose?

I have an eight-month-old daughter. Her experiments in mobility led me to contemplate phrases like the dirtier and messier, the better. What happens if one (but not both) of the adjectives before ...
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2answers
1k views

An adjective to describe a substance consisting of smaller-size grains

What adjective you would use to describe a substance consisting of grains of smaller size compared to those of another substance? For example, "Milk powder is ______er than sugar". Addition: And if ...
2
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1answer
4k views

“A less preferred approach”

I want to indicate that one approach to solve a problem is less preferred than another approach. How to phrase it correctly? Is it grammatically correct to state it this way? Modeling x and y is ...
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5answers
1k views

formation of comparisons

Is it incorrect to phrase a comparison in the following way: Men are prone more than women to depression. Or must the adjective always follow more? Men are more prone than women to depression.

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