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Questions tagged [comparatives]

The form of an adjective or adverb used to compare two or more things. English comparatives are formed with the suffixes -er/-est or the words more/most.

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when can i omit the subject in comparative sentences

I recently encountered two sentences - Cars made in Japan are better than those made in Korea. here, "those" cannot be omitted Prices of mangos in Thailand are much lower than (those) in England. ...
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1answer
2k views

"Twice (adj.)-er" vs. "two times (adj.)-er" vs. "twice/two times as (adj.) as"

Suppose we are comparing a particular characteristic (that takes comparative -er) of two items, A and B. Compared to B, A displays double that characteristic. There are multiple ways we can express ...
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1answer
7k views

An alternative term for 'lesser time'

I have two processes running with different speeds. In other words, one of them requires lesser time. I think 'Lesser time' is an awkward term. Is there any good alternative or synonym which I can use ...
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1answer
19 views

What are the comparative/superlative forms of the adjective "well," meaning "in good health"?

If I can say, "He is well," meaning, "He is in good health," how do I express that he's in better health, or that he's in the best health ever? "He's weller"? "He's ...
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1answer
34 views

To a less/lesser extent

The expression to a lesser extent meaning “less strongly or not so much” is commonly found with the comparative form of less. Curiously, Google Books shows that “to a less extent” was initially, ...
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1answer
63 views

"Fairly" can't be used with comparatives or negatives

Don't use ‘fairly’ in front of a comparative form, *the train is fairly quicker than the bus; in more formal writing, you use rather or somewhat. https://www.wordreference.com/EnglishUsage/fairly ...
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328 views

The number is smaller, fewer or less than?

I always make confusion about the correct usage of the comparative for "irregular" adjectives (I don't know if this is the correct term). Recently I had to write "the number of X is ...
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42 views

I seek grammatical justification for "I did more than finish the job"

I see people say such examples as "I did more than finish the job", "He did more than win the game". In such cases, "finish the job", which is a bare infinitival, occurs ...
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23 views

The usage of "to be" in double comparatives?

I read when "be" is used in double comparative, it is sometimes omitted in the book of "Top Notch", like: The better the quality of health care (is), the higher the life ...
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75 views

How to use two comparative adjectives in a row?

What is the right way to use two comparisons in a row? "He wants to marry somebody more beautiful and rich." "He wants to marry somebody more beautiful and richer." I was able to find examples ...
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138 views

Comparison of equality used as Adjunct - As good/happy as

I came across this sentence in A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini: As happy as she was about this pregnancy, his expectation weighed on her. I was trying to parse this sentence and was ...
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57 views

Comparative - dollars became more valuable as toilet paper than currency

New Zimbabwe dollars became more valuable as toilet paper than currency. I saw this sentence in an English exam. Is it a correct sentence? It seems to me that new Zimbabwe dollars is compared with ...
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56 views

The usage of 'a' in front of a comparative

Is this sentence correct? I'm not sure if adding an 'a' in front of 'more' is OK. To enable a more accurate spatial normalization process, manual re-orientation and positioning of the PET image ...
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96 views

Word Order and Comparative

Consider the different locations of the subject, adjective, and conjunction in the following sentences. A boy as trim as Bob should be a fast runner. As trim a boy as Bob should be a fast runner. ...
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2answers
199 views

adjective or comparative adjective for measurements and rates

I was going some through articles about fitness and I encountered these two sentences. Lifting lighter weights often means you're able to perform more repetitions for each exercise you complete ...
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1answer
239 views

Which is right? "Ambitious students are more likely to succeed than are those with little ambition / than those with little ambition

Which is right? "Ambitious students are more likely to succeed than are those with little ambition" or "Ambitious students are more likely to succeed than those with little ambition"
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1answer
2k views

Is "no other" + comparative grammatically correct?

There is no other harsher critic than yourself. I'm really stumped on this one. The more I read it the less correct it sounds. I think the word harsher is making the sentence sound fairly off putting....
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Comparative Construction - She can get through more work in an hour than I can get through in a day

I was reading the Comparative Construction Chapter from The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by Pullum and Huddlestone. There on page 1109, I came across one sentence: He is more afraid of ...
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113 views

Double comparatives: "more preferable"

Fowler reads Sometimes the double comparative form more preferable is used. The word more is of course unnecessary, since preferable by itself means ‘more desirable (than)’. Like other comparatives,...
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1answer
60 views

'Less good' vs 'worse'

Garner's fourth , page 263, reads Depend typically takes on (or, less good, upon). When a clausal complement follows the verb, to omit the on is a casualism— Is good here an adverb? Why not use ...
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14 views

More fair/rational point

In an essay for the IELTS test, I tried to say "The second group's opinion is better" and I wrote, "The second group makes a more rational point". Is it correct to say it this way? ...
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35 views

Comparative adverb vs. comparative adjective

I am a little torn on which usage is correct here, the comparative adjective "easier" or the comparative adverb "more easily." Every other day this year will begin easier than ...
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33 views

Comparative adverb

I was taught that object of a preposition is always a noun, but I have often seen that a comparison adverb comes immediately after a preposition, then a noun phrase preceded by an adverb comes, which ...
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19 views

Correct article with comparative, not for normal comparisson

Should the following contain a definite or indefinite article? Between Kevin and Andy, Kevin is a bigger hero. or Between Kevin and Andy, Kevin is the bigger hero.
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39 views

Can we use adverbs with Comparative adjectives?

He is much taller than me. Vs He is incredibly taller than me. Can we use incredibly here, with a comparative adjective(taller) ?
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20 views

"Faster than" using with Future Simple

I'm just wondering if it is right to say that I'll learn English faster than they will translate this book =or I'll learn English earlier than they will translate this book I'm confused about ...
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22 views

Tireder (comparative form)

According to the CambridgeGEL, page 1583, Participial adjectives take only analytic comparative forms (A marginal exception is tired) What are the reasons leading to this exception?
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48 views

Dispute over interpretation of "Less smaller"

I know that the correct form of "less smaller" is "less small" but that is the original phrase we went to a dispute over. This is the exact phrase. Someone: Most of the sites I ...
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20 views

The usage of "most" instead of "more"

Regarding the following sentence, The study noted that pregnant women need to have healthy diets to reduce risk of developing gestational diabetes, a form of diabetes that is most common among ...
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40 views

How interchangeable are the adjectives in the comparative “the closer/nearer, the …”?

In an allusion to Dave Starr’s magnificent¹ cover art, I had the opportunity to use its title idiomatically, and said: “The closer the bone, the sweeter the meat.” … and was promptly corrected: “...
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50 views

Is it grammatically correct to say "A is more pregnant than B"?

Since one is either pregnant or not, I am wondering if it is grammatically correct to say "A is more pregnant than B". For example, in one of the following two scenarios, can one correctly say "A is ...
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1answer
287 views

"more massive"?

I stumbled upon this sentence in Wikipedia: Titan is 50% larger than Earth's moon and 80% more massive. I struggle with the "more massive" part. I find some books do use that phrase. Is it ...
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27 views

Comparative/superlative forms and types of comparisons

I should complete the sentence with two to five words, including the word in bold. The mall isn't usually so busy. THAN The mall ............. today. - The mall is usually less busy than today....
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75 views

Early vs Earlier usage

Which of the following sentences are correct. Early vs earlier. Can I use both sentences? I went on my lunch break late. Next time I will try to take my break earlier. I went on my lunch break late. ...
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51 views

Usage of Comparative adjectives

I find myself using Comparative adjectives a lot more than just adjectives is there a rule of thumb? Here is an example...As I understand it, comparatives compare with something. It was not busy ...
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48 views

Is it grammatically incorrect to use comparative forms without an explicit object of comparison and without progression over time?

In colloquial English, comparative forms can be used ungrammatically. However, suppose I want to write in a strictly grammatical fashion. I know that some comparative forms can be used with an ...
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32 views

Is "far further" correct?

"Between his support for packing the Supreme Court and legalizing abortion up until the point of birth, there's no question that Buttigieg was far further to the Left of former President Barack Obama."...
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53 views

How usual are the comparative sentences like "the number of those under 6 years of age is higher than of those over 70"

I found the following sentences in Corpus of Contemporary American English. (1)the number of those under 6 years of age is higher than of those over 70. (2)the population density of Nuer areas is ...
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59 views

Can "harder" be used when the base case is null?

I'm mostly concerned with being able to say "I should try harder" when I'm currently not trying at all. This seems right to me, but other similar situations like "I should jump higher" if I'm not ...
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45 views

Should the usual way to construct a comparative sentence be singular or plural?

Let's say I want to compare two animals A rabbit runs faster than a turtle or Rabbits run faster than turtles. Which one should I prefer?
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1answer
35 views

Omission of subject in tensed clause

I know the subject can be omitted in untensed clauses. But I've encountered with the following: You spent more money than was intended to be spent. Here, 'than' seems to be functioning like a ...
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1answer
3k views

Comparing adverbs in comparative and superlative forms

Comparing with adverbs in comparative or superlative form: When would us louder / loudest and when would you use more loudly / most loudly
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1answer
52 views

How much shorter are your hands than mine?

or How much more expensive is your phone than mine? Are those questions well-formed? Do i have to use much here?
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1answer
1k views

The precise meaning of "to have something more to do with somebody/something"?

There are other questions about the meaning of "to have something to do with somebody/something". My question here is about "to have something more to do with somebody/something". There is a sense of ...
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1answer
2k views

More badly and most badly

According to Collins English Usage, Badly has another different meaning. If you need or want something badly, you need or want it very much: I am badly in need of advice; I want this job so ...
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1answer
126 views

Are both correct? The higher the priority

The earlier the request is made, the higher the priority it will be given. The earlier the request is made, the higher priority it will be given. Seems like 2 is more common than 1. I would like to ...
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2answers
258 views

comparative adjective + a + noun

a) When can I use "comparative adjective + a + noun" and when not? When can I add "a + noun" after "comparative adjective" and when not? b) What is the difference between ...
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5answers
9k views

Usage of "elder" and "eldest" in degrees of comparison

If one has two elder brothers, is it OK to say "My eldest brother is this and the second eldest is that"?
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2answers
5k views

Blurrier or more blurry?

I am not sure about this particular word, the sentence is the following 'Increase it for more blurry(ier) effect.'
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1answer
124 views

What is the correct comparative placement of "more"?

When using comparative statements, does it have to be: It is more that they were too afraid to fight than that they were lacking skills. or could it be like this: It is that they ...