Questions tagged [comparatives]

The form of an adjective or adverb used to compare two or more things. English comparatives are formed with the suffixes -er/-est or the words more/most.

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“Twice (adj.)-er” vs. “two times (adj.)-er” vs. “twice/two times as (adj.) as”

Suppose we are comparing a particular characteristic (that takes comparative -er) of two items, A and B. Compared to B, A displays double that characteristic. There are multiple ways we can express ...
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How to use two comparative adjectives in a row?

What is the right way to use two comparisons in a row? "He wants to marry somebody more beautiful and rich." "He wants to marry somebody more beautiful and richer." I was able to find examples ...
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64 views

Comparison of equality used as Adjunct - As good/happy as

I came across this sentence in A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini: As happy as she was about this pregnancy, his expectation weighed on her. I was trying to parse this sentence and was ...
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Comparative - dollars became more valuable as toilet paper than currency

New Zimbabwe dollars became more valuable as toilet paper than currency. I saw this sentence in an English exam. Is it a correct sentence? It seems to me that new Zimbabwe dollars is compared with ...
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46 views

Any more+comparitive+than

I heard a person saying, “That place is not any more riskier than this place”. (And it wasn’t about time- like how it has changed from earlier to now) I thought it’s grammatically incorrect to say so. ...
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“More Bored” Vs “Boreder”

I have a question about comparative adjectives. I read that if an adjective has only one syllable we write its comparative form as: adjective + er, e.g. bigger and if an adjective has more than two ...
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49 views

The usage of 'a' in front of a comparative

Is this sentence correct? I'm not sure if adding an 'a' in front of 'more' is OK. To enable a more accurate spatial normalization process, manual re-orientation and positioning of the PET image ...
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67 views

Word Order and Comparative

Consider the different locations of the subject, adjective, and conjunction in the following sentences. A boy as trim as Bob should be a fast runner. As trim a boy as Bob should be a fast ...
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170 views

adjective or comparative adjective for measurements and rates

I was going some through articles about fitness and I encountered these two sentences. Lifting lighter weights often means you're able to perform more repetitions for each exercise you complete ...
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547 views

comparative phrase 'more than'

I don't know the meaning of the phrase in this sentence We are seldom exposed only to a single contaminant in the environment-but more often than not to a cocktail of chemical mixture. How to ...
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2answers
69 views

Which preposition should one choose when having two adjectives that require different prepositions and different verb forms in a comparative?

unwilling to + infinitive and incapable of + ing form. Which one is the right sentence? The ruling class is incapable more than unwilling to pursue the public interest. vs The ruling class is ...
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140 views

Which is right? "Ambitious students are more likely to succeed than are those with little ambition / than those with little ambition

Which is right? "Ambitious students are more likely to succeed than are those with little ambition" or "Ambitious students are more likely to succeed than those with little ambition"
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An alternative term for 'lesser time'

I have two processes running with different speeds. In other words, one of them requires lesser time. I think 'Lesser time' is an awkward term. Is there any good alternative or synonym which I can use ...
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2k views

Is “no other” + comparative grammatically correct?

There is no other harsher critic than yourself. I'm really stumped on this one. The more I read it the less correct it sounds. I think the word harsher is making the sentence sound fairly off putting....
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38 views

Comparative after a noun

I saw this sentence somewhere in an academic article: "Most EFL teachers use English in portion smaller than their native language." Should it be 'smaller portion' instead? Or is there any rules that ...
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55 views

the same quality that/as we have been producing so far

We might need more time then due to the process especially if we want to keep producing at the same quality that/as we have been so far. Which word would you use?Is there a BE/AE disparity here? ...
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58 views

IPL should be more of cricket and less of entertainment. 'Less' or 'lesser'?

Should I use 'less' or lesser in the above statement? Is it possible to use two different degrees of comparison in the same sentence? Is there any exception?
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How usual are the comparative sentences like “the number of those under 6 years of age is higher than of those over 70”

I found the following sentences in Corpus of Contemporary American English. (1)the number of those under 6 years of age is higher than of those over 70. (2)the population density of Nuer ...
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58 views

Can “harder” be used when the base case is null?

I'm mostly concerned with being able to say "I should try harder" when I'm currently not trying at all. This seems right to me, but other similar situations like "I should jump higher" if I'm not ...
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42 views

Should the usual way to construct a comparative sentence be singular or plural?

Let's say I want to compare two animals A rabbit runs faster than a turtle or Rabbits run faster than turtles. Which one should I prefer?
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comparative adjective + a + noun

a) When can I use "comparative adjective + a + noun" and when not? When can I add "a + noun" after "comparative adjective" and when not? b) What is the difference between "comparative adjective + a + ...
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46 views

How much shorter are your hands than mine?

or How much more expensive is your phone than mine? Are those questions well-formed? Do i have to use much here?
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718 views

The precise meaning of “to have something more to do with somebody/something”?

There are other questions about the meaning of "to have something to do with somebody/something". My question here is about "to have something more to do with somebody/something". There is a sense of ...
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75 views

Are both correct? The higher the priority

The earlier the request is made, the higher the priority it will be given. The earlier the request is made, the higher priority it will be given. Seems like 2 is more common than 1. I would like to ...
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Usage of “elder” and “eldest” in degrees of comparison

If one has two elder brothers, is it OK to say "My eldest brother is this and the second eldest is that"?
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979 views

Blurrier or more blurry?

I am not sure about this particular word, the sentence is the following 'Increase it for more blurry(ier) effect.'
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122 views

What is the correct comparative placement of “more”?

When using comparative statements, does it have to be: It is more that they were too afraid to fight than that they were lacking skills. or could it be like this: It is that they ...