Questions tagged [comparatives]

The form of an adjective or adverb used to compare two or more things. English comparatives are formed with the suffixes -er/-est or the words more/most.

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What are the best words to describe subjects being compared?

I tried to Google this but no luck so far. I was wondering if there was proper words to describe the comparison of 2 subjects? The first subject would be the object being compared in relation to the ...
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Comparative after a noun

I saw this sentence somewhere in an academic article: "Most EFL teachers use English in portion smaller than their native language." Should it be 'smaller portion' instead? Or is there any rules that ...
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747 views

Stays (more) fresh (for longer)

My wife just said "stays more fresh for longer", which sounded double to me. But I don't know how to actually say it without being double. When you put something in the fridge it stays... more fresh....
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adjective or comparative adjective for measurements and rates

I was going some through articles about fitness and I encountered these two sentences. Lifting lighter weights often means you're able to perform more repetitions for each exercise you complete ...
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more happy as a comparative

I wonder if "more happy" could be used as a comparative. For example, "He is more happy than me". Is this sentence grammatically correct?
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Usage of “elder” and “eldest” in degrees of comparison

If one has two elder brothers, is it OK to say "My eldest brother is this and the second eldest is that"?
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Any more+comparitive+than

I heard a person saying, “That place is not any more riskier than this place”. (And it wasn’t about time- like how it has changed from earlier to now) I thought it’s grammatically incorrect to say so. ...
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Comparative form of adjective “starving”

There is a way to say hungrier, but my question is whether there is any way to use the same form with starve. I searched and found nothing. I would like to know the comparative adjective of starving.
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How to use two comparative adjectives in a row?

What is the right way to use two comparisons in a row? "He wants to marry somebody more beautiful and rich." "He wants to marry somebody more beautiful and richer." I was able to find examples ...
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1answer
61 views

Whether or not a “what” is needed after “than”

Please compare these 2 sentences. 1, lf you are overqualified for a particular job, you have more experience or training than __ is needed. (Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English) 2, The ...
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546 views

comparative phrase 'more than'

I don't know the meaning of the phrase in this sentence We are seldom exposed only to a single contaminant in the environment-but more often than not to a cocktail of chemical mixture. How to ...
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Conundrum: “cleverer” or “more clever”, “simpler” or “more simple” etc

I know the rule for making the comparative and superlative form for two-syllable words ending in y, replace the -y with i and use -er and -est: hap.py → happier → (the) happiest ti.dy → tidier → (...
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951 views

Blurrier or more blurry?

I am not sure about this particular word, the sentence is the following 'Increase it for more blurry(ier) effect.'
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Quantifier + comparative - so much drunk or so much drunker

I'd like to know what´s wrong in the sentence: I didn't drink any more than the guys did, but I got so much drunker. I believe it's the quantifier + the comparative that is wrong, but I'm not ...
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Are “No more healthy than” and “No more big than” both OK?

I am Japanese and a teacher of English. Now I am at a loss at a topic on "Comparison." This sentence should be considered grammatically OK: Oversleeping is no more healthy than overeating. ...
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The meaning and use of “no more than”

I'm always confused about the meaning and use of no more than versus no more ____ than. They're sometimes like comparatives, but sometimes also like collocation. How should I distinguish ...
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“no younger than I am” or “no more young than I am”? [closed]

"No _____er" or "No more _______" or both? I've come across this construction "He is no more (adjective) than I am" more than once, and there are at least two forums on the Internet where the subject ...
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the idiomatic use of “no more than” and “no less than”

I have questions about the use of no more than and no less than . The following is the item 14. phrase of the word more from COBUILD online dictionary. You use no more than or not more than when ...
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The meaning of “no more … than”

These two attitudes are no more contradictory than those two. Which of the following interpretations is right (or give me a better one if possible): Relatively, these two attitudes are not more ...
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672 views

Negative sentence, more than or no more than

Between the following couple of sentences, which one is right? Or better ask, which one is more right if both are right. A: A keyword can not contain more than three words. B: A keyword can contain ...
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It's no more glaring than in the early hours of a developing story

The following is an excerpt from The Japan Times of June 22. What does "It's no more glaring than in the early hours of a developing story" mean? The spread of misinformation ‒ "fake news" if that'...
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Meaning of no more likely

A is no more likely than B. Does this mean A is either as likely or less likely than B. A and B occur with the same likelihood.
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Differences between expressions including [not/no + more/less + than~]

I have read an article on English expressions of comparison on a website in Japanese, however I am still unsure about the content and would like to check if it is correct. It gives 4 examples as ...
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Which preposition should one choose when having two adjectives that require different prepositions and different verb forms in a comparative?

unwilling to + infinitive and incapable of + ing form. Which one is the right sentence? The ruling class is incapable more than unwilling to pursue the public interest. vs The ruling class is ...
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“Poorer” vs. “more poor”

As a non-native speaker I am curious about the everyday usage of more poor in contrast to poorer. The dictionary dictates poorer as the correct form, with some allowing both forms. According to ...
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the same quality that/as we have been producing so far

We might need more time then due to the process especially if we want to keep producing at the same quality that/as we have been so far. Which word would you use?Is there a BE/AE disparity here? ...
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1answer
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An alternative term for 'lesser time'

I have two processes running with different speeds. In other words, one of them requires lesser time. I think 'Lesser time' is an awkward term. Is there any good alternative or synonym which I can use ...
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relative word choice: as or which

Yet climbing Ayers Rock, as most other Australians knew the vast red monolith until recently, has long been a favoured pastime of tourists. source - Is it better to use "which "instead of "as "in "...
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IPL should be more of cricket and less of entertainment. 'Less' or 'lesser'?

Should I use 'less' or lesser in the above statement? Is it possible to use two different degrees of comparison in the same sentence? Is there any exception?
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When should “farther” and “further” be used?

I know I learned the difference between the usage of farther and further in school, but I can never remember where each one should be used. Can someone help me out here?
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comparative adjective + a + noun

a) When can I use "comparative adjective + a + noun" and when not? When can I add "a + noun" after "comparative adjective" and when not? b) What is the difference between "comparative adjective + a + ...
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Use of “The better”?

Disclamer: English isn't my first language. I learned during my English courses (a few years ago), that there is, as in French (which is my first language), a comparative and superlative version for ...
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What do “the more” and “the less” modify in “The more our knowledge of things is certain and particular, the less it is possible for us to feign”?

The following is an excerpt from The Young Spinoza: A Metaphysician in the Making. (1) The more our knowledge of things is certain and particular, the less it is possible for us to feign; What do ...
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Should I write: “areas becoming denser” or “more dense”?

I am trying to describe how cities have been affected by the growing population in terms of the density of bodies. This is how I have it at the moment but I am unsure whether it should be "more dense"...
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“Lower number” vs. “smaller number”

Is −9 a smaller number than −8? And is −9 a lower number than −8? What is the difference between lower and smaller here?
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1answer
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comparative of the adjective “grave”

I had written The effect of traumatic experience may be graver if... and the editor has corrected it to The effect of traumatic experience may be more grave if... Surely grave conforms to ...
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1answer
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Much more/ much less

There is a question in our grammar book that goes like this: Her husband, a plumber's assistant, earns only 300 dollars a month, which makes it very difficult for her to feed and clothe her ...
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What is the difference between “acoustic” and “audio”?

What is the difference between "acoustic" and "audio"? Background: When I think of the class of data in the binary computer file, I don't know the difference. One of my coworkers asserts that it is ...
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143 views

Do -ist words (e.g. racist) have superlative or comparative forms?

Do -ist words (e.g. racist, sexist, etc.) have superlative or comparative forms?
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Comparative, superlative using “one of”

Which is correct: Today is one of the warmer days this month. Today is one of the warmest days this month. I hear the first used almost exclusively on television news.
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489 views

Usage of twice and two times with “size”

Below are taken from a grammar book. a) The Earth is about **four times as big as** the moon. = The Earth is about **four times bigger than** the moon. b) The Earth is about twice as big as ...
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Usage and explanation of “no more … than”

The spirited defense of 2 Live Crew was no more about defending the entire black community than the prosecution was about defending black women The first part of the sentence is clear that "X is no ...
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Comparison of equality used as Adjunct - As good/happy as

I came across this sentence in A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini: As happy as she was about this pregnancy, his expectation weighed on her. I was trying to parse this sentence and was ...
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'as much as' VS 'more than'

Please, help me. I am so confused with my English task. Very few books are read ___ Harry Potter by children. a) as much as b) more than c) the most   Very few channels are watched ...
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Is it “more just” or “juster”?

I was recently writing a sentence and added the words "more just", only for my extension Grammarly to flag the phrase and suggest "juster" instead. Is "juster" really a comparative form of "just"? If ...
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Comparative - dollars became more valuable as toilet paper than currency

New Zimbabwe dollars became more valuable as toilet paper than currency. I saw this sentence in an English exam. Is it a correct sentence? It seems to me that new Zimbabwe dollars is compared with ...
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Adverbs in comparative degree and anyone or everybody rules

1 question. Can you please help to understand the use of adverb in this sentence structure and which one is correct!? Open the brackets: 1. A turtle moves.... (slow) than a rabbit. Which one is ...
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How much shorter are your hands than mine?

or How much more expensive is your phone than mine? Are those questions well-formed? Do i have to use much here?
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“Like something more” or “like something better”

When people like something more than something else, it's common for me to hear them say they like it better than something else. Is this proper English? I've always thought the word more fits better, ...
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Comparative or superlative use of the word “far”

Which sentence is correct? The quarterback threw the ball farthest than anyone else on the team. The quarterback threw the ball farther than anyone else on the team. The quarterback threw the ball ...