Questions tagged [comparatives]

The form of an adjective or adverb used to compare two or more things. English comparatives are formed with the suffixes -er/-est or the words more/most.

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1answer
34 views

quantifiers in comparatives adjectives [closed]

Good morning. I'd like to ask you something. I was confused about these words. They said " a bit, a little, slightly, a lot, and much" are all intensifiers in comparative sentences. But ...
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"more massive"?

I stumbled upon this sentence in Wikipedia: Titan is 50% larger than Earth's moon and 80% more massive. I struggle with the "more massive" part. I find some books do use that phrase. Is it ...
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What are the comparative/superlative forms of the adjective "well," meaning "in good health"?

If I can say, "He is well," meaning, "He is in good health," how do I express that he's in better health, or that he's in the best health ever? "He's weller"? "He's ...
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To a less/lesser extent

The expression to a lesser extent meaning “less strongly or not so much” is commonly found with the comparative form of less. Curiously, Google Books shows that “to a less extent” was initially, ...
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"Fairly" can't be used with comparatives or negatives

Don't use ‘fairly’ in front of a comparative form, *the train is fairly quicker than the bus; in more formal writing, you use rather or somewhat. https://www.wordreference.com/EnglishUsage/fairly ...
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comparative adjective + a + noun

a) When can I use "comparative adjective + a + noun" and when not? When can I add "a + noun" after "comparative adjective" and when not? b) What is the difference between ...
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What does "no worse than ..." mean?

What does the writer mean by saying "no worse than stealing?" It is thought the scam, which stores say is no worse than stealing, is a product of our ‘fast-fashion culture’, where trends ...
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Usage of "elder" and "eldest" in degrees of comparison

If one has two elder brothers, is it OK to say "My eldest brother is this and the second eldest is that"?
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Why are comparative adjectives used here, with the definite article? "...a hatred, the deeper for being concealed..."

In this sentence, the article 'the' precedes several comparative adjectives: 'deeper', 'bitter', 'greater', and 'stronger'. Now, for context, this sentence is the beginning of a text, and the ...
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Comparative Construction - She can get through more work in an hour than I can get through in a day

I was reading the Comparative Construction Chapter from The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by Pullum and Huddlestone. There on page 1109, I came across one sentence: He is more afraid of ...
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adjective or comparative adjective for measurements and rates

I was going some through articles about fitness and I encountered these two sentences. Lifting lighter weights often means you're able to perform more repetitions for each exercise you complete ...
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"Hair no more streaked with grey than was becoming" – meaning & grammar [closed]

I was reading Jeffrey Archer's Kane and Abel, where on page 191 I found this line: William began to be aware of his housemaster's wife during his last two terms at St. Paul's. She was a good-looking ...
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NEGATIVES WITH COMPARATIVES [closed]

This listening question is confusing me (woman): Have you gotten over your cold yet? (man): I couldn’t be feeling any better today. (narrator): What does the man mean? a. He’s feeling terrific. b. He ...
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Double comparatives: "more preferable"

Fowler reads Sometimes the double comparative form more preferable is used. The word more is of course unnecessary, since preferable by itself means ‘more desirable (than)’. Like other comparatives,...
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'Less good' vs 'worse'

Garner's fourth , page 263, reads Depend typically takes on (or, less good, upon). When a clausal complement follows the verb, to omit the on is a casualism— Is good here an adverb? Why not use ...
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"Twice (adj.)-er" vs. "two times (adj.)-er" vs. "twice/two times as (adj.) as"

Suppose we are comparing a particular characteristic (that takes comparative -er) of two items, A and B. Compared to B, A displays double that characteristic. There are multiple ways we can express ...
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Comparative adjectives cannot have -er ending [closed]

Questions on the use of lesser have appeared on here before, but I was reading a book on grammar which states the following (I omitted parts to keep it brief, but I retained what I think are the ...
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How to describe the reverse order which in some contexts is the natural order on things?

In writing a paper my team and I need to explain that in a sublist L of, say, [1,2,3,...,100] (for instance L = [3,5,43,70]) the item with the lowest number has highest priority. How would one best ...
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Does "than" introduce a potential ambiguity? [closed]

source: an FT news article (paywalled, but searchable) Chief among these [obstacles] is Europe’s reluctance to view China with the same existential concern as America does. The continent does more ...
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Morphological comparison of adjectives ending in "-ic"

Page 267 of Fowler's Dictionary of Modern English Usage reads Adjectives ending in -ic (comic, rustic, etc.), -ive (active, restive, etc.), and -ous (famous, odious, virtuous, etc.) do not have -er ...
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Is it "more just" or "juster"?

I was recently writing a sentence and added the words "more just", only for my extension Grammarly to flag the phrase and suggest "juster" instead. Is "juster" really a comparative form of "just"? If ...
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superlative or comparison

I have a question about some sentences. John is better than Sarah and Mary. or John is the best. If I'm comparing three things (John, Sarah, Mary), why am I using a comparative adjective? I ...
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More fair/rational point

In an essay for the IELTS test, I tried to say "The second group's opinion is better" and I wrote, "The second group makes a more rational point". Is it correct to say it this way? ...
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What's wrong with "stupider"?

On online boards I've seen some people claim that "stupider" is ungrammatical. I can't see any reason why it would be, and it seems like it's commonly used. It's also in online dictionaries,...
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Comparative adverb vs. comparative adjective

I am a little torn on which usage is correct here, the comparative adjective "easier" or the comparative adverb "more easily." Every other day this year will begin easier than ...
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The disaster we worried about "most" or "the most"?

I heard a Ted talk say When I was a kid, the disaster we worried about most was a nuclear war. I wonder why it was not "the disaster we worried about THE most"?
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Comparative adverb

I was taught that object of a preposition is always a noun, but I have often seen that a comparison adverb comes immediately after a preposition, then a noun phrase preceded by an adverb comes, which ...
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Is "Our creamiest coffee, now creamier" correct?

Kopiko's tagline here in the Philippines became a hot topic. Others had been saying that it is grammatically wrong but others said that it is correct.
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"More Bored" Vs "Boreder"

I have a question about comparative adjectives. I read that if an adjective has only one syllable we write its comparative form as: adjective + er, e.g. bigger and if an adjective has more than two ...
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"More clear" vs "Clearer": when to use "more" instead of "-er"?

Which one of these adjectives is correct? I can see that both of them are being used, I'm just not sure which one is grammatically correct. Are there any general rules to follow as to the use of one ...
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2answers
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Less-experienced vs less experienced employee

As an Android developer with 3 years of experience, I also help less experienced team members. Do I need to put a hyphen between "less" and "experienced"?
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"as" or "than" in comparative constructions

Is it usually as or than that is used in such constructions as the following? Twice as many men said they liked action movies as/than comedies. Twice as many customers ordered pizza as/than Caesar ...
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The number is smaller, fewer or less than?

I always make confusion about the correct usage of the comparative for "irregular" adjectives (I don't know if this is the correct term). Recently I had to write "the number of X is ...
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Which is more proper "rarest" or "most rare"?

In the following usage, which is the correct form for the superlative of the adjective "rare"? "the rarest on Earth" or "the most rare on Earth"?
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Correct article with comparative, not for normal comparisson

Should the following contain a definite or indefinite article? Between Kevin and Andy, Kevin is a bigger hero. or Between Kevin and Andy, Kevin is the bigger hero.
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Can I say "more funny" or "most funny" instead of "funnier" or "funniest"?

Could you please provide a reference to your answer whatever it is? I know that "funnier" and "funniest" are more correct, but I want to know whether the less common versions are considered errors or ...
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Can I say 'This transmitter extends three times signal range than the other one'? [closed]

I'm not sure if I should use 'than' or 'from' in this sentence > "This transmitter extends three times signal range than the other one". Please advise. Thanks.
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Are "compared to" and "with respect to" interchangeable?

For example: The results showed higher stability for the first enzyme compared to the second one. Would this sentence have the same meaning if I changed compared to with with respect to?
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Is there a linguistic term for the phrases, which describe a noun, with subjective value (below)

a pitted excuse for a road a big bear of a man a gigantic furious beast of a man a wisp of a boy/girl
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I seek grammatical justification for "I did more than finish the job"

I see people say such examples as "I did more than finish the job", "He did more than win the game". In such cases, "finish the job", which is a bare infinitival, occurs ...
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A word that means 'most important'?

I tried to find a single word that means "most important", but I couldn't. I want it to be able to express what's missing below: If you get hurt, the _ thing to do is to stay calm. It would need ...
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Is it correct to use the comparative adjective "blacker?"

You can find bluer, redder, greener, and whiter in the dictionary, but not blacker. This seems mystifying. In his "El Paso" song, Marty Robbins sang, "Blacker than night were the eyes of ...
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Writing a comparative sentence with two comparative parameters [closed]

Consider two aqueous solutions: Solution 1 Solution 2 Then note that: The temperature of the solution 1 is higher than that of the solution 2. The pressure of the solution 1 is lower than that of ...
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'quickest': adverb

Page 442 of Collins Cobuild English Usage reads Quick is an adjective. You do not usually use it as an adverb. Instead you use quickly. In writing, you usually use more quickly. He began to speak ...
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Can we use adverbs with Comparative adjectives?

He is much taller than me. Vs He is incredibly taller than me. Can we use incredibly here, with a comparative adjective(taller) ?
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How interchangeable are the adjectives in the comparative “the closer/nearer, the …”?

In an allusion to Dave Starr’s magnificent¹ cover art, I had the opportunity to use its title idiomatically, and said: “The closer the bone, the sweeter the meat.” … and was promptly corrected: “...
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Is the usage of "more frequently" or "more often" correct in this scenario?

If I think that an event does not take place at all but the event does take place once, is the other person correct in saying that the event takes place more often / more frequently than I think?
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"Faster than" using with Future Simple

I'm just wondering if it is right to say that I'll learn English faster than they will translate this book =or I'll learn English earlier than they will translate this book I'm confused about ...
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Action of comparatives on connected clauses

Consider the sentence Though somewhat less (i) _____than previous chapters and suffering from a minor rash of academic jargon, the final chapter of the book is nonetheless (ii) ______laypeople. How ...

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